What's in a name?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by chanel, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    Makes sense, doesn't it?
     
  2. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    You bet it does.

    I don't think that prejudice plays out so overtly (or with much evil intent, either) as this thread suggests, but I can tell you from personal experience that having a name that seems alien to some people makes those folks less likely to want to interact with you.

    What to know what usually motives those people to pretend you're not in the room?

    They don't want to insult you or upset you by mispronouncing your name. (ironic isn't it?)

    So here we have an example of people acting with good intentions, whose actions end up having negative outcomes.

    And then of course there's always the overt enthnocentrists.

    They don't really hate other ethnics, they just so love their own so much that they are predudiced in the favor of their birds of a feather pals..

    Now these ethnocentics imagine that they're not prejudiced because they really don't really hate people based on their ethnic.

    They just love their own kind so much that they end up unconsciously being prejudiced in favor of the more familiar.

    That's actually how most people are, in my opinion.

    They're not anti-other races, they are merely so wildly FOR their own perceived race or group that others "need not apply."





    .
     
  3. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    Great points. I read "Freakanomics" several years ago and they did a study that showed that blacks with "common names" were far more likely to be employed than those with silly or African sounding names.

    But I think people can learn something from this. In naming a child, give them every opportunity you can, even if you think it's hogwash.
     
  4. Rozman
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    Rozman Gold Member Supporting Member

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    I would have to agree.
    I would much rather deal with a Fred or Mary
    then a Rolandaquan or a Shenequatz.
     
  5. old navy
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    old navy <<< Action Figures

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    At the start of every school year, I work hard on...... let me re-phrase that. I put forth great effort in learning my students' names. It shows that I give a damn and it helps build rapport. Some parents should be shot though due to the names they gave their kids. Some names have way too many vowels. Some of the Middle Eastern kids want their name to sound as American as possible while others want me to pronounce their name with an accent that takes practice. Some names are just down right cruel. Mahogany for example. Please, if you name your daughter MaHOGany, at least help her stay under 200 pounds until she gets out of high school. One last gripe. Parents should not name their kids after Disney cartoon characters. Cute lion names are not cute when assigned to 15 year old humans.

    A couple of years ago I had a BOY named Ariel. A smart-ass admin assistant walked in class one day looking for him. She must have assumed he was a girl because when she walked in the room and came over to my desk, she said, "Do you have a little mermaid named Ariel." This was loud enough for the students to hear. Fortunately he was a football stud and didn't get laughed at as he got up and went with the genius that just made a fool of herself.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  6. Iridescence
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    Iridescence BANNED

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    lol
     
  7. FuelRod
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    FuelRod Gold Member

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    Barack?
     
  8. Baruch Menachem
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    Baruch Menachem '

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    This kind of silliness is universal. My mom's grandpa was named Alby Royal. Other names in the family are no better.

    My mom got named after two aunts, both with romantic sounding names. When it came to her turn she went as vanilla as she could.

    My dad's family always liked prosaic names, but the last name is east european and looks hard to pronounce even though it isn't. I like it, and my dad made it a good one. So I am keeping it.
     
  9. xotoxi
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    xotoxi Platinum Member

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    That's why AVG-JOE was chosen as a mod over me.
     
  10. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    Ha ha. Would you like me to start a petition? Would you mind if we called you "Hugs" for short?
     

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