Three Proposals on the Black Family

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by PoliticalChic, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    "In 1965, 25 percent of black children were being raised in fatherless homes, and the situation was correctly characterized as a crisis. Today, the rate is three times that in many minority communities.

    The absent father stands alone as the most reliable predictor of social and psychological trouble. Research by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that annual household income is below $30,000 for 65 percent of children in single-mother families, compared with 15 percent of children in two-parent families. Children raised in homes without fathers are more likely to run away, commit suicide, use drugs, be arrested, and engage in a host of other unfortunate—and sometimes deadly—behaviors.

    First, because many people remain ignorant of the relationship between fatherlessness and social pathology, the Obama administration could create a massive national awareness program highlighting it.

    The program, which Kennedy deployed in High Point, North Carolina, used shame, threats, community pressure, and social support to reduce violent crime dramatically.

    ... traditional male initiation rites...Much like the boot-camp approach that breaks soldiers down to rebuild them with a firm identity, Rohr’s simulated initiation process includes several key themes whose message is drilled into the participants, including that life is hard and that you aren’t all that important. "

    Three Proposals on the Black Family by Peter Cove, City Journal 20 November 2009
     
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  2. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    I grew up in the civil rights era. we changed a lot of things, always with good intentions. unfortunately the law of unforeseen consequences kicked in and the results of many of those changes has hurt a lot of people, typically the most vulnerable. be careful when you ask for change because it never turns out the way you planned.
     

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