This Day in US Military History

Discussion in 'Military' started by mhansen2, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    31 October

    1803 – Congress ratified the purchase of the entire Louisiana area in North America, which added territory to the United States for 13 subsequent states.

    1861 – “Peerless” was a Union transport steamer of 690 tons. While carrying a cargo of stores and cattle for the Port Royal invasion, she sank in a storm along the Hatteras coast. Steam sloop-of-war USS Mohican rescued the crew.

    1863 - “Kate” was a Union schooner that was lost at Brazos Pass (Texas?).

    1864 – “Aphrodite” was a Union chartered screw steamer of 1098 tons and was built in 1864 at Mystic, Conn. While carrying 510 Union navy recruits from New York to join the Atlantic and Gulf Squadrons, the she was wrecked on a shoal in Core Sound, 12 miles north northeast of Cape Lookout.

    Sidewheel steamer USS Keystone State and USS Sholokon rescued the crew and sailors and removed the cargo on November 4th, 1864. The ship broke later in two pieces and her anchors, cables and other parts were salvaged.

    1864 – “David Hughes” was a steamer chartered by the Union army that was carrying government supplies and a barge. She was captured and burned by the Confederates about 15 miles above Clarksville on the Cumberland River.

    1864 – “Shooting Star” was a Union cargo ship carrying 1,500 tons of coal from New York City to Havana, Cuba when she was captured by steamer CSS Chickamauga off the NE coast off the USA.

    1864 – Anxious to have support of the Republican-dominated Nevada Territory for President Abraham Lincoln’s reelection, the U.S. Congress quickly admits Nevada as the 36th state in the Union.

    1913 – Dedication of the Lincoln Highway, the first automobile highway across United States.

    1918 – In the worst global epidemic of the century, influenza (an acute, contagious respiratory viral infection) had been spreading around the world since May.

    1941 – USS Reuben James (DD-245), while escorting 42-ship convoy HX 156, is torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-552 off western Iceland, 115 men are killed. No merchantmen in HX 156 are attacked. Despite the heavy oil slick in the vicinity and the need to investigate sound contacts, USS Niblack (DD-424) rescues 36 men (one of whom dies of wounds on 2 November).

    Hilary P. Jones (DD-427) picks up 10. The loss of Reuben James, the first U.S. naval vessel to be lost to enemy action in World War II, proves a temporary detriment to Navy recruiting efforts.

    1943 – LT Hugh D. O’Neill of VF(N)-75 flying a F4U-2 Corsair destroys a Japanese aircraft during night attack off Vella Lavella in first kill by a radar-equipped night fighter of the Pacific Fleet.

    1952 – The United States exploded the first hydrogen bomb at Eniwetok Atoll in the Pacific.
    Operation Ivy

    1956 – Rear Admiral G.J. Dufek became the first person to land an airplane at the South Pole. Navy men land in R4D Skytrain on the ice at the South Pole. RADM George Dufek, CAPT Douglas Cordiner, CAPT William Hawkes, LCDR Conrad Shinn, LT John Swadener, AD2 J. P. Strider and AD2 William Cumbie are the first men to stand on the South Pole since Captain Robert F. Scott in 1912.

    1958 - A US Air Force RB-47 Stratojet was attacked by Soviet fighters over the Black Sea. The crew of three were not injured and the aircraft returned safely to base.

    1961 – End of Lighter than Air in U.S. Navy with disestablishment of Fleet Airship Wing One and ZP-1 and ZP-3, the last operating units in LTA branch of Naval Aviation, at Lakehurst, New Jersey.

    1964 - NASA astronaut Theodore Freeman is killed when a goose smashes through the cockpit canopy of his Northrop T-38A Talon jet trainer, 63-8188, at Ellington AFB, Texas. Flying shards of Plexiglas enter the jet engine intake, causing the engine to flameout. Freeman ejects but is too close to the ground for his parachute to open properly. He is posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

    2014 – One person is dead and another injured after Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo explodes and crashes in California’s Mojave Desert during a test flight of the spaceplane.
     
  2. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    1 November

    1765 – The Stamp Act went into effect, prompting stiff resistance from American colonists.

    1783 – Continental Army dissolved and George Washington made his “Farewell Address.”

    1800 – John and Abigail Adams moved into “the President’s House” in Washington DC. It became known as the White House during the Theodore Roosevelt administration.

    1841 – “Mosquito Fleet” commanded by LCDR J. T. McLaughlin, USN, carries 750 Sailors and Marines into the Everglades to fight the Seminole Indians.

    1864 – “Empress Theresa” was a Union bark of 312 tons that was captured and burned by screw steamer CSS Olustee off the Delaware Capes.

    1864 – “Goodspeed” was a Union schooner of 283 tons (of Philadelphia) that was captured and burned by screw steamer CSS Chickamauga off Block Island, Rhode Island. Along with Goodspeed, also schooner Otter Rock (91 tons) was sunk.

    1864 – “Otter Rock” was a Union schooner of 91 tons that was captured and scuttled by screw steamer CSS Chickamauga while carrying a cargo of potatoes, off Block Island, Rhode Island. Along with Otter Rock, also schooner Goodspeed (283 tons) was sunk.

    1864 – “Winslow” was a Union screw steamer of 265 tons built in 1862 at Cleveland, Ohio. She collided with another vessel at Cleveland and sank.

    1915 – Parris Island is officially designated a United States Marine Corps Recruit Depot.

    1920 - Coast Battleship No.1 (ex-USS Indiana, BB-1) was sunk during tests off Tangier Island, Maryland, in shallow water. The tests were a response to claims from Billy Mitchell—at the time assistant to the Chief of Air Service—who stated to Congress that the Air Service could sink any battleship. Hulk sold 19 March 1924 and broken up for scrap.

    1932 – Werner von Braun was named head of German liquid-fuel rocket program.

    1939 – 1st jet plane, a Heinkel He 178, was demonstrated to German Air Ministry.

    1941 – President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 8929 transferred the Coast Guard to Navy Department control.

    1944 – The first of some 9000 paper balloons, carrying bombs intended to be dropped over North American land, are released near Tokyo.

    1944 – The US B-29 Superfortress “Tokyo Rose” of the 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron makes the first American flight over Tokyo since 1942.

    1945 - First prototype McDonnell XFD-1 Phantom, BuNo 48235 crashes as a result of aileron failure killing McDonnell's chief test pilot Woodward Burke.

    1949 - A Lockheed P-38L Lightning, NX26297 flown by Bolivian Air Force pilot Erick Rios Bridoux, collides in midair with Eastern Airlines Flight 537, a Douglas DC-4 airliner, N88727, on its final approach to National Airport (now Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport). All 55 people on board the Douglas DC-4 die; the P-38 pilot survived with injuries. Bridoux was considered one of Bolivia's most experienced pilots. Among the dead were Congressman George J. Bates and former Congressman Michael J. Kennedy. DC-4 wreckage comes down on Virginia shoreline of the Potomac River, north of Mount Vernon. It was (at the time) the worst plane crash in the history of civil aviation. The P-38 pilot was accused of causing the accident, later tried and cleared of the charges, which now is believed to have been an ATC error.

    1950 – Griselio Torresola and Oscar Collazo attempt to assassinate President Harry S. Truman at the Blair House in Washington, D.C.

    1950 – MiG-15 jet fighters made their first appearance during the Korean War as they flew along the Yalu River to contest the Fifth Air Force’s then complete dominance of the skies over North Korea.

    1951 – Operation Buster–Jangle: Six thousand five hundred American soldiers are exposed to ‘Desert Rock’ atomic explosions for training purposes in Nevada. Participation is not voluntary.

    1952 - A USAF F-84G of 1211th Test Squadron piloted by Capt. Jimmy Priestly Robinson during atomic testing Operation Ivy is lost at sea and neither Robinson nor his aircraft are ever found.

    1966 – Test pilot Bill Dana flew the X-15 to 93,543 meters (306,914 feet) and Mach 5.46.
     
  3. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    2 November

    1811 – Battle of Tippecanoe: Gen William Henry Harrison routed Indians. Following the signing of the Treaty of Greenville in summer 1795, relative peace prevailed between the white settlers and the natives of the Old Northwest. The Washington and Adams administrations at least paid lip service to the terms of the treaty, but Jefferson sought additional lands for American farmers through a series of purchases from the tribes. Not all the frontiersmen bothered with the niceties of treaties and simply occupied Indian lands illegally. Not without reason, resentment among the tribes ran high. In 1808, Tecumseh, a Shawnee chieftain, and his brother Tenskwatawa (known to the Americans as The Prophet) launched a reform movement among their people. They attempted to end the sale of additional lands to the whites and to resist alcohol and other troublesome temptations of the competing culture.

    1824 – Popular presidential vote was 1st recorded; Andrew Jackson beat John Quincy Adams.

    1861 – “Union” was a Union side-wheel transport steamer of 149 tons, built in 1861 at Augusta, Maine that ran onto a beach in a storm and broke in two 8 miles east of Bogue Inlet and 16 miles from Fort Macon, North Carolina.

    The crew and 15 horses were captured by Confederates along with some supplies. Union was carrying a cargo of rifle muskets, horses, gun carriages and musket powder for the Port Royal invasion.

    1862 – “Levi Starbuck” was a Union whaling ship of 376 tons out of New Bedford, Mass. She was on route to the Pacific Ocean whaling grounds when she was captured and burned by screw sloop-of-war CSS Alabama some 240 miles NNW of Bermuda after the stores were removed.

    1889 – North Dakota was made the 39th state.

    1889 – South Dakota was made the 40th state.

    1899 – USS Charleston (C-2) grounded on an uncharted reef near Camiguin Island north of Luzon. Wrecked beyond salvage, she was abandoned by all her crew, who made camp on a nearby island, later moving on to Camiguin while the ship´s sailing launch was sent for help. On 12 November, USS Helena (PG-9) arrived to rescue the shipwrecked men.

    1923 – Lt. Harold J. Brow, US Navy, set new world speed record in Mineola, New York, of 259.16 MPH (417.07 KPH) in a Curtiss R2C-1 racer.

    1931 – VS-14M on USS Saratoga (CV-3) and VS-15M on USS Lexington (CV-2) were the first Marine carrier-based squadrons.

    1941 - Wisconsin-native Lieutenant Thomas "Bud" L. Truax is killed, along with his wingman, Lt. Russell E. Speckman, in a Curtiss P-40 Warhawk training accident during poor weather in San Anselmo, California. In the late afternoon, San Anselmo residents are startled when two low-flying Curtiss P-40C Warhawks, 41-13375 and 41-13454, roar up the valley at just above roof level and crash into the east side of Bald Hill just shy of the peak at 1740 hrs. It was almost dark, was misty and they were under a low cloud ceiling. They were critically low on fuel and part of a larger training group that had gotten separated. They were under the wintertime marine layer of low clouds that are common in the Marin County area, searching for nearby Hamilton Field to land. Madison Army Air Field, Wisconsin, is named Truax Field in his honor in 1942. A third pilot, Lt. Walter V. "Ramblin" Radovich, flying 41-13392, had left the formation over San Rafael, almost hit the city courthouse on 4th Street, circled the Forbes Hill radio beacon (37°58'44.73"N, 122°32'50.78"W), clipped a tree and then turned northeast, towards Hamilton Field. Unsure of what the oncoming terrain might be and critically low on fuel, he decides to climb up though the typically thin marine cloud layer to 2500 ft, trim the airplane for straight and level flight and bail out.

    According to USAAF accident reports, his left leg was broken when exiting the plane and he parachuted down, landing near Highway 101 in Lucas Valley reportedly near where Fireman's Fund / Marin Commons is currently located (38° 1'10.66"N, 122°32'29.36"W). Ironically, after Lt. Radovich bailed out, the airplane slowly descended back down through the clouds and made a relatively smooth "gear up" landing. All aircraft were of the 57th Pursuit Group (Interceptor), on a cross-country flight from Windsor Locks Army Air Field, Windsor Locks, Connecticut, to McChord Field, Washington.

    1942 - A Boeing B-17C Flying Fortress, 40-2047, c/n 2117, breaks apart in the air near Tells Peak, California, while en route to Sacramento for an overhaul of the number 3 (starboard inner) engine. Pilot 1st Lieutenant Leo M. H. Walker dies, but the other eight crew members survive.

    1943 – The Battle of Empress Augusta Bay in Bougainville ended in U.S. Navy victory over Japan. US Task Force 39 detects the approach of the Japanese cruiser squadron led by Admiral Omori (steaming from Rabaul in New Britain Island to Bougainville), shortly after midnight. In the engagement that follows the Japanese lose 1 cruiser and 1 destroyer and most of the other ships are damaged. The Americans suffer damage to 2 cruisers and 2 destroyers. However, the Japanese force abandons its mission.

    1953 - First prototype Convair YF-102 Delta Dagger, 52-7994, suffers engine failure due to fuel injection system problem during test flight, lands wheels up, severely injuring pilot Richard L. Johnson, airframe written off.

    1955 - Air Force Douglas B-26C-45-DT Invader, 44-35737, crashed into houses on Barbara Drive in East Meadow, Long Island, New York. An aerial photograph of the crash scene, "Bomber Crashes in Street", by George Mattson, of the New York Daily News, earned him, and 25 of his newspaper colleagues, the 1956 Pulitzer Prize Photography Award. KWF are Captain Clayton Elwood and Sergeant Charles Slater.
    B-26 bomber crashes in Long Island, 1955 - Photos - Daily News' most iconic images

    1957 – The Levelland UFO Case in Levelland, Texas, generates national publicity. The Levelland UFO Case occurred in and around the small town of Levelland, Texas. Levelland, which in 1957 had a population of about 10,000, is located west of Lubbock on the flat prairie of the Texas panhandle. The case is considered by ufologists to be one of the most impressive in UFO history, mainly because of the large number of witnesses involved over a relatively short period of time. However, both the US Air Force and UFO skeptics have labeled the incident as being caused by either ball lightning or a severe electrical storm.

    1981 - McDonnell-Douglas F-15A-14-MC Eagle. 75-0051, of the 59th TFS, 33d TFW, based at Eglin AFB, crashes near Panama City, Florida after mid-air collision with McDonnell Douglas F-15A Eagle, 76-0048, during night refuelling. Pilot killed. Second F-15 lands okay.

    1986 - U.S. Coast Guard Sikorsky HH-3F Pelican 1473, c/n 61-635, out of CGAS Kodiak, on medical evacuation mission, strikes high cliff and falls to the beach below on Ugak Island, off Kodiak, Alaska; burns. KWF were LT Michael Clement Dollahite (CG Aviator #2148), LT Robert L. Carson, Jr., CDR David Meurice Rockmore, USPHS, ASM2 Kevin M. McCraken, AT3 William G. Kemp, HS3 Ralph D. King.

    1992 - A United States Navy Grumman EA-6B Prowler crashes in field near NAS El Centro, California. The three crewmen ejected at a very low altitude while inverted, and all were killed. Crew included Lt. Charles Robert Gurley (USN), Lt. Peter Limoge (USMC), and Ltjg. Dave Roberts (USN).

    1999 – Former USS Schofield (DEG-3/FFG-3) was sunk as a target some 23 miles SW of Point Conception, California.

    2000 – Expedition One Commander William M. (Bill) Shepherd of NASA and cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko of Roscosmos arrived at the International Space Station in the Soyuz TM-31 spacecraft marking the start of an uninterrupted human presence on the orbiting laboratory. The trio landed on 21 March 2001 at the Kennedy Space Center aboard Space Shuttle STS-102.

    2006 – Former USS Valley Forge (CG-50) was sunk as a target some 60 miles NNW of Kauai Island, Hawaii.
     
  4. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    3 November

    1853 – USS Constitution seizes suspected slaver H. N. Gambrill.

    1861 – “Governor” was a Union side-wheel steamer of 644 tons, built in 1846 at New York City. While carrying Maj. John G. Reynolds and the Union Marine Battalion of 385 men (among 650 passengers) and 19.000 rounds of ammunition, Governor was overwhelmed by a storm and lost steering control. She sank while being towed by screw steamer USS Isaac Smith. Most passengers were saved, but 6 lost their lives.

    1861 – “Brilliant” was a Union sailing vessel carrying a cargo of flour and grain from New York City for London. She was captured and burned by screw sloop-of-war CSS Alabama on the Newfoundland Banks.

    1864 – The following Union ships were captured and burned by steamer CSS Olustee off the Delaware Capes:

    Arcole (full-rigged ship)
    E. F. Lewis (schooner)
    T. D. Wagner (brig)
    Vapor (schooner)

    1864 - During Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s raid at Johnsonville, Tennessee, the following Union ships were lost:

    Arcola (stern-wheel steamer 203 tons)
    Aurora (screw steamer 331 tons)
    Celeste (barge)
    Chickamauga (barge)
    Doan No.2 (stern-wheel steamer 250 tons)
    Eagle Coal Co. (barge)
    USS Elfin (tinclad gunboat 192 tons)
    Goody Friends (Stern-wheel steamer, 195 tons)
    J. B. Ford (steamer, 197 tons)
    J. H. Doane (barge)
    Josephine (barge)
    J. W. Cheeseman (stern-wheel steamer, 215 tons)
    Kentucky (barge)
    USS Key West No.3 (stern-wheel tinclad)
    Mountaineer (stern-wheel steamer, 211 tons)
    USS Tawah (side-wheel steam tinclad)
    T. H. U. S. 57 (barge)
    U.S. No.22 (barge)
    U.S. No.44 (barge)
    Venus (stern-wheel steamer 235 tons)
    Whale No.8 (barge)
    Most of them were burned to prevent capture by the enemy. The Union supply depot and docks were also torched.

    1883 – U.S. Supreme Court declared American Indians to be “dependent aliens.”

    1903 – With the support of the U.S. government, Panama issues a declaration of independence from Colombia. The revolution was engineered by a Panamanian faction backed by the Panama Canal Company, a French-U.S. corporation that hoped to connect the Atlantic and Pacific oceans with a waterway across the Isthmus of Panama. In 1903, the Hay-Herrýn Treaty was signed with Colombia, granting the United States use of the Isthmus of Panama in exchange for financial compensation. The U.S. Senate ratified the treaty, but the Colombian Senate, fearing a loss of sovereignty, refused. In response, President Theodore Roosevelt gave tacit approval to a rebellion by Panamanian nationalists, which began on November 3, 1903.

    1918 – There was a mutiny of the German fleet at Kiel. This was the first act leading to Germany’s capitulation in World War I.

    1931 – Dirigible USS Los Angeles (ZR-3) makes a ten-hour flight out of NAS Lakehurst, NJ, carrying 207 persons, establishing a new record for the number of passengers carried into the air by a single craft.

    1933 - First fatal accident involving a Fokker YO-27 occurs when pilot Lt. Lloyd E. Hunting with Sgt. John J. Cunningham aboard, departs Olmsted Field, Middletown Air Depot, Pennsylvania, in 31-589 of the 30th Bombardment Squadron at 1800 hrs. after darkness had fallen. Pilot had apparently not observed a mountain ridge, 400 to 800 feet (120 to 240 m) high, one mile from the airfield, when he landed during the afternoon, and upon departure did not see it in the dark, crashing head-on into the ridge, aircraft burned, both crew KWF.

    1941 – The Combined Japanese Fleet receive Top-Secret Order No. 1: In 34 days-time, Pearl Harbor is to be bombed, along with Malaya, the Dutch East Indies, and the Philippines.

    1943 – USS Oklahoma (BB-37), sunk at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, is refloated.

    1945 - Consolidated LB-30/Consolidated C-87 Liberator Express, AL-640, assigned to the 1504th AAF Base Unit, Fairfield-Suisun Army Air Base, piloted by Norman C. Fisher, runs out of fuel 500 miles NE of Honolulu while en route to Fairfield-Suisun Army Air Base, California, and ditches in the Pacific at 0740 hrs. more than four hours after it departed Hawaii, at approximately 149-50W/25-25N. It went down about 50 miles from regular patrol routes. Eighteen lives are lost with eight survivors. Surface vessels rescued those saved from life rafts. Twenty-one passengers and six crew were aboard, including two women, one a civilian and one a WAC.

    One of the women was rescued. Bodies of seven were recovered. Seven ships, including aircraft carriers, were involved in the search. On 11 January 1946, headquarters of the commanding general of the Pacific division in Honolulu announces the conviction of John R. Patrick, 27, of Tulare, California, on a charge of involuntary manslaughter after being accused of failing to "determine positively" whether the plane had been refueled before takeoff. Public relations officers said that the general court-martial that tried Patrick also convicted him of destruction of government property through "wrongful neglect". Patrick, a civilian, was one of the eight survivors. His defense, according to the public relations office, was that he did take precautions. He was sentenced to six months confinement and fined $2,000.

    1948 - Boeing RB-29A Superfortress, 44-61999, "Overexposed", of the 16th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 91st Reconnaissance Group, 311th Air Division, Strategic Air Command, USAF, crashes on Shelf Moor, Bleaklow, in between Manchester and Sheffield, Derbyshire, while descending through cloud. All 13 crew KWF. It is doubtful they ever saw the ground. The time was estimated from one of the crew members wrist watch. The plane, piloted by Captain L. P. Tanner, was on a short flight, carrying mail and the payroll for American service personnel based at USAF Burtonwood. The flight was from Scampton near Lincoln to Burtonwood near Warrington, a flight of less than an hour. Low cloud hung over much of England, which meant the flight had to be flown on instruments. The crew descended after having flown for the time the crew believed it should have taken them to cross the hill. Unfortunately the aircraft had not quite passed the hills and struck the ground near Higher Shelf Stones, being destroyed by fire.

    1957 – The Soviet Union launches the first animal into space–a dog name Laika–aboard the Sputnik 2 spacecraft. Laika, part Siberian husky, lived as a stray on the Moscow streets before being enlisted into the Soviet space program. Laika survived for several days as a passenger in the USSR’s second artificial Earth satellite, kept alive by a sophisticated life-support system. Electrodes attached to her body provided scientists on the ground with important information about the biological effects of space travel. She died after the batteries of her life-support system ran down.

    1965 – Test pilot Robert Rushworth flew the X-15 to 21,519 meters (70,603 feet) and Mach 2.31. This was the first test of external fuel tanks, which were empty on this flight.

    1979 – Sixty-three Americans were taken hostage at the US Embassy in Teheran, Iran. The overthrow of Muhammad Reza Shah Pahlevi of Iran by an Islamic revolutionary government earlier in the year had led to a steady deterioration in Iran-U.S. relations.

    1986 – The Lebanese magazine Ash Shiraa reports that the United States has been secretly selling arms to Iran in an effort to secure the release of seven American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon. The revelation, confirmed by U.S. intelligence sources on November 6, came as a shock to officials outside President Ronald Reagan’s inner circle and went against the stated policy of the administration. In addition to violating the U.S. arms embargo against Iran, the arms sales contradicted President Reagan’s vow never to negotiate with terrorists.

    2002 - An McDonnell-Douglas FA-18C Hornet from VFA-34 failed to return to USS George Washington (CVN-73) from a night at sea bombing mission and crashed into Adriatic Sea. Pilot was killed.

    2004 – A National Guard F-16 fighter plane mistakenly fired off 25 rounds of ammunition at the Little Egg Harbor Intermediate School in South New Jersey on this night.

    2014 – One World Trade Center officially opens, replacing its predecessor 13 years after the September 11 attacks.
     
  5. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    4 November

    1798 – Congress agreed to pay a yearly tribute to Tripoli, considering it the only way to protect U.S. shipping. The US has no appreciable Navy as yet. This is the most expedient and assured way to protect American shipping in the Mediterranean.

    1923 – Lt. Alford J. Williams, USN, sets a new world’s speed record of 266.59 MPH (429.02 KPH) in Mineola, New York in a Curtiss R2C-1 racer.

    1927 - US Army Air Corps Capt. Hawthorne C. Gray succeeds in setting new altitude record in a silk, rubberized, and aluminum-coated balloon out of Scott Field, Illinois, reaching 42,270 feet, but dies when he fails to keep track of his time on oxygen, and exhausts his supply. The record is recognized by National Aeronautical Association, but not by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale because the dead aeronaut "was not in personal possession of his instruments." Gray is posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his three ascents on 9 March, 4 May and 4 November.

    1941 - Tail section of Lockheed YP-38 Lightning, 39–689, separates in flight over Glendale, California, Lockheed Lightning crashes inverted on house at 1147 Elm Street, killing Lockheed test pilot Ralph Virden. Home owner survives, indeed, sleeps right through the crash.

    1944 – British Gen. John Dill dies in Washington, D.C., and is buried in Arlington Cemetery, the only foreigner to be so honored.

    1947 - A USAF pilot and co-pilot successfully belly-land burning Boeing B-29-70-BW Superfortress, 44-69989, of the 98th Bomb Group, in a wheat stubblefield S of Wilbur, Washington, after ordering five crew to bail out. The bomber was on a flight from Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, to Spokane Air Force Base when an engine caught fire. Residents of Wilbur saw it circling with an engine afire as the pilot sought a place to put it down. First communications to Spokane Field that it was in trouble came about 1500 hrs. Those who jumped received various injuries, but the pilot and co-pilot were uninjured.

    1954 - Convair YF2Y-1 Sea Dart, BuNo 135762, disintegrated in mid-air over San Diego Bay, California, during a demonstration for Navy officials and the press, killing Convair test pilot, Charles E. Richbourg. Pilot inadvertently exceeded airframe limitations.
    File:Convair XF2Y-1 disintegrates over San Diego Bay 1954.jpg - Wikipedia

    1954 - A USAF Convair T-29A-CO, 50–189, on a routine training flight departs Tucson Municipal Airport, Arizona, after refueling for return leg to Ellington AFB, Texas. Shortly after departure, the pilot radios that he has mechanical problems and requests emergency return to Tucson. Aircraft strikes power lines on final approach and crashes into a perimeter fence short of the runway. All crew are KWF.

    1955 - While operating in the Pacific with the 7th Fleet, USS Hancock (CVA-19) flies aboard Vought F7U-3 Cutlass, BuNo 129586, 'D', of VF-124, but tailhook floats over all wires, jet hits barrier, and ejection seat is jarred into firing when nose gear collapses. Pilot LTJG George Barrett Milliard, in his seat, is thrown 200 feet down the deck and suffers fatal injuries when he strikes the tail of an AD Skyraider. Airframe written off.

    1956 – Following nearly two weeks of protest and political instability in Hungary, Soviet tanks and troops viciously crush the protests.

    1958 - A United States Air Force Boeing B-47E-56-BW Stratojet, 51-2391, of the 12th Bomb Squadron, 341st Bomb Wing (M), catches fire during take-off from Dyess AFB, Texas, crashes from 1,500 feet (460 m) altitude. Three crew eject, okay: Capt. Don E. Youngmark, 37, aircraft commander; Capt. John M. Gerding, 27, pilot; and Capt. John M. Dowling, 30, observer and navigator. The crew chief was killed – no bail out attempted.

    One sealed pit nuclear weapon containing no plutonium and some tritium was aboard the plane; the resultant detonation of its primary HE made a crater 35 feet in diameter and six feet deep. There was some local tritium contamination. The weapon secondary was recovered intact but damaged near the crash site; the weapon case was destroyed. The tritium reservoir was found intact but leaking. The impact crater contained many small fragments of bomb casing, but no HE, which was believed to have been consumed by either explosion or fire.

    1960 – Test pilot Robert Rushworth flew the X-15 to 14,905 meters (48,903 feet) and Mach 1.95.

    1962 – In a test of the Nike Hercules air defense missile, Shot Tightrope of Operation Fishbowl is successfully detonated 69,000 feet above Johnston Atoll. It would also be the last atmospheric nuclear test conducted by the United States.

    1962 - A Russian-flown MiG-21 Fishbed intercepted two US Air Force F-104C Starfighters from the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing on a reconnaissance sortie near Santa Clara, Cuba, but the F-104s disengaged and retired northward.

    1965 – Test pilot Bill Dans flew the X-15 to 24,445 meters (80,204 feet) and Mach 4.22.

    1969 – Former USS Bailey (DD-492) was sunk as a target off Florida.

    1971 – USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636) launches a Poseidon C-3 missile in first surface launch of Poseidon missile.

    1984 – CGC Northwind (WAGB-282) seizes the P/C Alexi I off Jamaica for carrying 20 tons of marijuana, becoming the first icebreaker to make a narcotics seizure.
     
  6. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    5 November

    1863 – “Curlew” was a Union screw steamer of 343 tons, built in 1856 at Newtown, N.Y. she collided with steamer USS Louisiana and sank near Point Lookout, Maryland.

    1863 – “Nassau” was a Union chartered steam tug of 518 tons, built in 1851 at New York that was sunk at Brazos Pass, Texas.

    1863 – “Patridge” was a Union schooner that was lost at Brazos Pass, Texas.

    1864 – “R. H. Barnum” was a Union stern wheel paddle steamer of 30 tons built in 1862 at Warren, Ohio. She was captured and burned by Lt. Col. A. Witcher and the 34th Virginia Cavalry Battalion in Buffalo Shoals near Louisa, Kentucky.

    1864 – “Fawn” was a Union steamer of 25 tons built at Pittsburgh, Pa. She was captured and burned by Lt. Col. A. Witcher and the 34th Virginia Cavalry Battalion in Buffalo Shoals.

    1864 – CSS Spray was a Confederate steam gunboat of 105 tons armed with two guns and thought to be built at Wilmington in 1852. She was sunk by Confederates on the St. Mary’s River, Georgia to avoid capture by Union forces.

    1864 - CSS Run'Her was a steamer built in England in 1863 that was part of a group of four blockade runners carrying equipment and materials for the manufacturing and laying of mines. After departing London, the vessel sank in Angra Bay, São Miguel Island (Azores) during a stopover on her way to the Confederation due to a maneuver error ordered by her captain.

    1909 - The United States Army Wright Military Flyer, serial 1, piloted by Lieutenant Frank P. Lahm with 2nd Lieutenant Frederick E. Humphreys as passenger crashes into the ground at College Park Airport, Maryland, while executing a sharp right turn. The aircraft had lost altitude due to engine misfiring and the aircrew had not taken account of their proximity to the ground when banking the aircraft to the right. Both officers were unhurt but the aircraft required repairs. The skids and the right wing had to be replaced.

    1915 – At Pensacola Bay, FL., LCDR Henry C. Mustin launched himself from USS North Carolina (ACR-12) via catapult in a Curtiss Model AB-2 seaplane, recording both the world's first catapulting of an aircraft from a ship and the first takeoff from a ship underway.

    1917 – USS Alcedo (SP-166) was torpedoed and sunk by UC-71 (Ernst Steindorff), off Penmarch, France. There were 21 casualties.

    1923 – Tests designed to prove the feasibility of launching a small seaplane from a submarine occur at Hampton Roads Naval Base. A Martin MS-1, stored disassembled in a tank on board USS S-1, was removed and assembled. Then the submarine submerged allowing the plane to float free and take off.

    1934 - Pioneer Air Service aviator Col. Horace Meek Hickam, (1885–1934), dies when his Curtiss A-12 Shrike, 33–250, of the 60th Service Squadron, strikes an obstruction during night landing practice on the unlighted field at Fort Crockett, Texas, and overturns.

    "The field at Fort Crockett, Texas, home of the 3rd Attack Group, was too short. Because of its smallness and the roughness of its southern end, planes landing to the south, even against a light wind, made it a point to touch down between its boundary lights-the field's only lights just beyond the shallow embankment of its northern threshold. On the evening of November 5, Air Reserve Second Lieutenants Harry N. Renshaw and Andrew N. Wynne were standing on the porch of Group Operations talking to Captain Charles C. Chauncey, the Operations Officer, watching Uncle Horace Hickam shooting night landings in his Curtiss A-12. It was close to eight o'clock as they observed the Colonel coming in for his second touchdown. They realized he was low and was going to undershoot, so did Hickam. He applied power to correct the error and then chopped it off too soon. The watchers saw the A-12's wheels hit the embankment just below its top, saw the plane flipped on its nose, skidding along the ground, the weight of its engine tearing up the turf, and then saw it snap over on its back, slewing completely around. The three men were running toward the aircraft before the sound had died. Wynne arrived first, yelling, ‘Colonel, are you hurt? Can you hear me?’ There was no answer. The cockpit rim was flat on the ground. A group of enlisted men came charging up, followed by the crash truck and an ambulance. Even after Renshaw had driven the cab of the ambulance under the broken tail fin, with the men holding up the fuselage, they could not get Hickam free of the cockpit. It was necessary to dig a trench to do that. By the time Renshaw and Wynne had managed to get the Colonel out of his parachute and onto a litter, Captain Byrnes, the base doctor, had arrived. While the ambulance raced to the Marine Hospital, Byrnes did what he could, but it was too late. Renshaw believed his CO was dead before they had managed to free him from the cockpit." Hickam Field, Oahu, Hawaiian Islands, was named for him 21 May 1935.

    1941 – The Japanese government decides to attempt to negotiate a settlement with the United States, setting a deadline of the end of November. The US rejects the offer because the Japanese will not repudiate the Tripartite Agreement with Italy and Germany and because the Japanese wish to maintain bases in China. The US code breaking service continues to intercept all Japanese diplomatic communication.

    1945 – Ensign J. C. West (VF-41) took off from USS Wake Island (CVE-65) in a Ryan FR-1 Fireball, a combination prop-jet design, and soon experienced problems with the Wright R-1820-72W Cyclone radial piston engine. Before the reciprocating powerplant failed completely, he started the General Electric I-16 jet engine and returned to the ship, thus making the first ever landing by jet power alone on a carrier.

    1948 - Boeing DB-17G Flying Fortress, 44-83678 returning to Eglin AFB, Florida from Fort Wayne, Indiana, crashes and burns NE of the runway at Eglin main base early Friday. All five on board are KWF, including Lt. Col. Frederick W. Eley, 43, of Shalimar, Florida, Maj. Bydie J. Nettles, 29, who lived in Shalimar, Florida, Capt. Robert LeMar, 31, Ben's Lake, Eglin AFB, test pilot with the 3203rd; crew chief M/Sgt. Carl LeMieux, 31, of Milton, Florida; and Sgt. William E. Bazer, 36, assistant engineer, Destin, Florida.

    1959 – Test pilot Scott Crossfield flew the X-15 to 13,857 meters (45,464 feet) and Mach 1.00 before an engine fire forced an emergency landing. Despite the narration in the following video, not all the fuel was jettisoned and the plane landed heavy, resulting in fuselage structural failure.


    1986 – USS Rentz (FFG-46), Reeves (CG-24) and Oldendorf (DD-972) visit Qingdao (Tsing Tao) China – the first US Naval visit to China since 1949.

    2009 – US Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13 and wounds 29 at Fort Hood, Texas in the deadliest mass shooting at a US military installation.
     
  7. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    6 November

    1861 – Jefferson Davis is elected president of the Confederate States of America.

    1861 - Confederate States schooner Ada, on a voyage from Baltimore with a cargo of wood, was wrecked 5–6 miles from the mouth of the Curatona Branch, Rappahannock River or on Corrotoman Creek, 26 miles from the mouth of the Rappahannock River, Virginia. The Ada was subsequently attacked and set on fire by a Union party from steamer USS Rescue.

    1861 – CSS Huntress was a Confederate ship that was sunk together with CSS Lady Davis by Confederates to block Skull Creek, South Carolina.

    1861 - CSS Lady Davis (CSS Gray, James Gray) was a Confederate screw steamer, built in 1858 at Philadelphia. She was sunk together with CSS Huntress and other light boats to block Skull Creek, SC.

    1863 – “Amanda” was a Union bark of 598 tons carrying a cargo of hemp and sugar from Bangor, Maine or Boston and on route from Manila, Philippines for Queenstown, Ireland. She was captured and burned in the East Indies or Indian Ocean by sloop-of-war CSS Alabama.

    1865 - USS Jacob Bell was a Union side wheel paddle gunboat of 229 tons built in 1842 at New York. She was decommissioned on the 13th May 1865 and foundered at sea when on route to New York City while under the tow by steamship USS Banshee.

    1917 – Bolshevik “October Revolution” (October 25 on the old Russian calendar), led by Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, seized power in Petrograd. Led by Bolshevik Party leader Vladimir Lenin, leftist revolutionaries launch a nearly bloodless coup d’ýtat against Russia’s ineffectual Provisional Government. The Bolsheviks and their allies occupied government buildings and other strategic locations in the Russian capital of Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) and within two days had formed a new government with Lenin as its head. Bolshevik Russia, later renamed the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was the world’s first Marxist state.

    1942 - Grumman UC-103, 42-97044, former civilian Grumman G-32 Gulfhawk III, ex-NC1051, built for the Gulf Oil Refining Company, delivered 6 May 1938 and impressed by the USAAF in November 1942, used as VIP ferry aircraft, 427th Air Base Squadron, Homestead Army Air Field, force-lands in the southern Florida Everglades with engine failure: written off.

    1944 - U.S. Navy Douglas R4D-5, BuNo 39063, c/n 9941, built as a USAAF C-47A-40-DL, 42-24079, and transferred to the Navy, collides with Goodyear FG-1A Corsair, BuNo 13334, and crashes into the St. Johns River near NAS Jacksonville, Florida. All 18 on both planes killed.

    1944 – Plutonium is first produced at the Hanford Atomic Facility and subsequently used in the Fat Man atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan.

    1947 – Test pilot Chuck Yeager flew the X-1 to 14,823 meters (48,634 feet) and Mach 1.35. First-ever aircraft flight to exceed July 6, 1944, flight speed record (702 mph/1,130 km/h) of Heini Dittmar in Me 163B V18 prototype.

    1950 - A US Navy bomber with twelve crew members on board was reported to have failed to return from a combat patrol over the Strait of Formosa. Its fate was never learned.

    1951 - While conducting an intelligence gathering mission, later claimed to be a "weather reconnaissance mission under United Nations command", a US Navy P2V-3W Neptune (BuNo 124283 - not 124284 as listed in some sources) of VP-6 was shot down over the Sea of Japan, near Vladivostok, by Soviet La-11 Fangs flown by I. Ya. Lukashyev and M.K. Shchukin. The Soviet pilots reported that they intercepted the aircraft in the area of Cape Ostrovnoy approximately 7-8 miles from the shore. After they fired on the aircraft, it fell, burning, into the water and exploded 18 miles from the shore. The crew of Judd C. Hodgson, Sam Rosenfeld, Donald E. Smith, Reuben S. Baggett, Paul R. Foster, Erwin D. Raglin, Paul G. Juric, William S. Meyer, Ralph A. Wigert Jr. and Jack Lively were reported as missing.

    1956 - A Boeing B-47E-60-BW Stratojet, 51-2421, c/n 450474, of the 96th Bombardment Wing, Altus AFB, Oklahoma, suffers engine trouble while on a routine training mission late Tuesday, crashing on a farm near Hobart, Oklahoma, killing four crew. According to Ranson Hancock, publisher of the Hobart Democrat Chief, the bomber hit the ground about 320 yards W of a barn owned by Charles C. Harris, skidded into the barn and exploded. Officials identified the victims as Maj. Joseph E. Wilford, aircraft commander, Capt. Francis P. Bouschard, pilot, Capt. Lee D. Ellis, Jr., instructor-aircraft observer, all having families at Altus, and 1st Lt. Andrew J. Toalson, observer, Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

    1971 – The US Atomic Energy Commission exploded a 5-megaton bomb beneath Amchitka Island, Alaska, (shot Cannikin of Operation Grommet) just 87 miles from the Petropavlovsk Russian naval base. It was a test of the Spartan ABM warhead and registered as a magnitude 7 earthquake.

    1990 - Crew of a US Navy Grumman A-6E Intruder, '506', of VA-176, suffering engine fire, aim bomber away from Virginia Beach, Virginia oceanfront before ejecting just after take-off from NAS Oceana, Virginia's Runway 5. Bomber comes down at 2215 hrs. in the Atlantic Ocean ~.75 miles offshore, after just clearing the Station One Hotel, on-shore breeze carries crew inland about three blocks from the beach, one landing in a tree, the other in a courtyard of a condominium, suffering only cuts and bruises. Aircraft, on routine training mission, was unarmed. Officials did not identify the crew, but said the pilot was a 29-year-old lieutenant, and the bombardier-navigator was a 34-year-old lieutenant commander, both assigned to VA-176.

    2014 - A United States Army Boeing AH-64D Apache crashed close to Gowen Field, Idaho in the United States, two crew killed.

    2014 - A United States Air Force Lockheed Martin F-16C Fighting Falcon of the 82d Aerial Targets Squadron, 53d Weapons Evaluation Group, on a routine training mission out of Tyndall AFB, crashed into the Gulf of Mexico 57 miles (92 km) south of Panama City, Florida, when the base lost contact with it at ~0915 hrs. Civilian pilot Matthew LaCourse killed, body recovered later that day. LaCourse was a former USAF pilot who retired in 2000 as a lieutenant colonel after 22 years of service with over 2,000 flight hours in the F-4 Phantom II and 1,500 hours in other types, including the F-16C. He was formerly the commander of the 82d ATRS, said Lena Lopez, spokesperson for the 53d WEG. From 1 January to 12 December 2014, civilians flew 337 of the 526 sorties in QF-16s and QF-4s, or 64 percent, flown by the 82d. Civilians make up 60 percent of the 82d pilots, active duty military pilots comprise the other 40 percent.
     
  8. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    7 November

    1805 – Lewis and Clark reached the Pacific Ocean. Their survival over the ‘04-’05 winter was attributed to the help of the Nez Perce Indians.

    1861 - CSS Winslow was a Confederate side-wheel steamer of 207 tons, built in 1846 at New York City. She hit a submerged wreck while trying to help the French corvette Prony at the entrance to Ocracoke Inlet, NC. The ship was set afire by the crew to avoid capture.

    1862 - SS J. P. Smith was a blockade runner steamer reported as "wrotten" when captured by steamers USS Kinsman and Seger. She was run hard aground and burned at Bayou Cheval about 9 miles from Grand Lake, LA (?).

    1862 - SV Thomas B. Wales was a Union East India Trader of 599 tons. She was carrying a cargo of jute, linseed and 1,700 bags of saltpeter from Calcutta, India for Boston when she was captured and burned off New England by sloop-of-war CSS Alabama.

    1864 - Union sloop Buckskin was burned on Chopawamsic Creek, VA. after being recaptured by steamer USS Anacostia from the Confederates.

    1915 – The Austrian submarine U-38 shells and then torpedoes the liner, Ancona bound for New York from Italy. Among the 208 dead are 25 US citizens. The Austrian response to the protests of the US government is considered inadequate.

    1948 - Second prototype Republic XR-12 Rainbow, 44-91003, crashes at 1300 hrs. while returning to Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. The number 2 (port inner) engine exploded as the aircraft was returning from a photographic suitability test flight. The pilot was unable to maintain control due to violent buffeting, and he ordered the crew to bail out. Five of the seven crew escaped safely, including pilot Lynn Hendrix, rescued by Eglin crash boats and helicopters. Airframe impacts two miles S of the base, in the Choctawhatchee Bay. Sgt. Vernon B. Palmer, 20, and M/Sgt. Victor C. Riberdy, 30, who lived at Auxiliary Field 5, but were from Hartford, Connecticut, are KWF.

    1953 - People's Republic of China PLAAF pilot Xicai Lin claimed to have shot down a US Navy PBM-5A Mariner at Qianlidao in Qingdao. This might have been BuNo 58152, reported lost over the Yellow Sea on November 10th with a crew of 14.

    1954 - A US Air Force RB-29 Superfortress reconnaissance aircraft was shot down by Soviet fighters, flown by Kostin and Seberyakov, near Hokkaido Island in northern Japan. The plane carrying a crew of eleven was conducting routine photographic reconnaissance near Hokkaido and the southern most of the disputed Kuril Islands. The plane was attacked and seriously damaged, forcing the crew to bail out. Ten crewmen were successfully rescued after landing in the sea; however, the eleventh man drowned when he became entangled in his parachute lines after landing.

    1957 – The final report from a special committee called by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to review the nation’s defense readiness indicates that the United States is falling far behind the Soviets in missile capabilities and urges a vigorous campaign to build fallout shelters to protect American citizens.

    Headed by Ford Foundation Chairman H. Rowan Gaither, the committee concluded that the United States was in danger of losing a war against the Soviets. President Eisenhower was less impressed. Intelligence provided by U-2 spy plane flights over Russia indicated that the Soviets were not the mortal threat suggested by the Gaither Report. Eisenhower, a fiscal conservative, was also reluctant to commit to the tremendously increased military budget called for by the committee.

    1958 - A US Air Force RB-47 Stratojet was attacked by Soviet fighters east of Gotland Island over the Baltic Sea. The crew of three were not injured and the aircraft returned safely to base.

    1963 – Test pilot Robert Rushworth flew the X-15 to 25,085 meters (82,304 feet) and Mach 4.40.

    1969 – Former USS Bream (AGSS-243) was sunk as a target by USS Sculpin (SSN-590).

    1971 - A U.S. Air Force McDonnell F-4D-27-MC Phantom II, 65-0653, c/n 1657, 'HO' tailcode, of the 7th TFS, 49th TFW, based at Holloman AFB, New Mexico, and a U.S. Air Force Convair F-106A-130-CO Delta Dart, 59-0125, of the 84th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Hamilton AFB, California, suffer mid-air collision and crash in isolated areas near Nellis AFB, Nevada. All three crew eject and survive. The F-4 crew comprise Maj. Henry J. Viccellio and Maj. James A. Robertson. The Phantom comes down 35 miles from Caliente, Nevada, the Delta Dart attempts recovery to Nellis but pilot Maj. Clifford L. Lowrey ejects eight miles NE of base.

    1973 – Congress overrode President Nixon’s veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s power to wage war without congressional approval. The act requires the president to inform Congress within forty-eight hours of military action in a hostile area. Forces must be removed within sixty to ninety days unless Congress approves of the action or declares war.

    1978 - USN Douglas A-4F Skyhawk Blue Angel, BuNo 155056, crashes during pre-show exhibition at NAS Miramar, San Diego, California. Pilot, Lt. Mike Curtin, dead on impact, no ejection.

    1998 – The shuttle Discovery (STS-95) landed in Cape Canaveral, FL after 9 days in space. The crew included 77-year-old John Glenn who was visibly weak but elated after the mission.

    2003 – The US and Russia signed an agreement under which Russia would retrieve, within the next 5 to 10 years, uranium from research reactors in 17 countries.
     
  9. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    8 November

    1864 – “D. Godfrey” was a Union bark that was carrying a cargo of beef and pork. She was captured in mid-Atlantic by sailing ship CSS Shenandoah and set on fire after the removal of the cargo.

    1889 – Montana became the 41st state. The state’s name is derived from the Spanish word montaña (mountain). Montana has several nicknames, although none official, including “Big Sky Country” and “The Treasure State.” (YAY! My home state.)

    1898 – The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898, the only instance of an attempted coup d’état in American history. The Wilmington Coup d’Etat of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in Wilmington, North Carolina starting on November 10, 1898 and continued for several days.

    1916 – “SS Columbian” was an American cargo steamer of 8,580 grt that was captured and sunk with explosives by German submarine U-49 when 50 miles NW of Cape Ortegal, Spain and en route from New York & Boston via St. Nazaire for Genoa with a general cargo and steel plate.

    1916 - Lieutenant Clarence K. Bronson, Naval Aviator No. 15, and Lieutenant Luther Welsh, on an experimental bomb test flight at Naval Proving Ground, Indian Head, Maryland, were instantly killed by the premature explosion of a bomb in their plane.

    1923 – Adolf Hitler, president of the far-right Nazi Party, launches the Beer Hall Putsch, his first attempt at seizing control of the German government. After World War I, the victorious allies demanded billions of dollars in war reparations from Germany. Efforts by Germany’s democratic government to comply hurt the country’s economy and led to severe inflation. The German mark, which at the beginning of 1921 was valued at five marks per dollar, fell to a disastrous four billion marks per dollar in 1923. Meanwhile, the ranks of the nationalist Nazi Party swelled with resentful Germans who sympathized with the party’s bitter hatred of the democratic government, leftist politics, and German Jews.

    1938 - Col. Leslie MacDill, commissioned in the Coast Artillery in 1912, became a military pilot in 1914, and commanded an aerial gunnery school in St. Jean de Monte, France in World War I, is killed this date in the crash of his North American BC-1, 37–670, of the 1st Staff Squadron, at 1807 13th Street, SE, Anacostia, D.C. after take-off from Bolling Field. Southeast Air Base, Tampa, Florida, is renamed MacDill Field on 1 December 1939. Also killed is Private Joseph G. Gloxner. Two other sources give date of 9 November for accident.

    1943 - Boeing B-17F-75-DL Flying Fortress 42-3553, c/n 8489, 'QJ-H', "Sad Sack", of the 339th Bomb Squadron, 96th Bomb Group, crashes at Middle Farm, West Harling, Norfolk, United Kingdom shortly after taking off from RAF Snetterton Heath with the loss of all ten crew.

    1944 – 1st Lt. Edward R. “Buddy” Haydon, in his P-51D Mustang of the 357th Fighter Group killed Major Walter Nowotny, commander of Kommando Nowotny, flying the Me-262 jet fighter. This event almost caused Hitler to kill the jet fighter program.

    1945 – Former USS Hogan (DD-178/DMS-6/AG-105) was sunk as a target in bombing tests off San Diego.

    1950 – During the Korean conflict the first all-jet air combat took place over Korea as U.S. Air Force Lieut. Russell J. Brown, piloting an F-80 Shooting Star, shot down two North Korean MiG-15s. It lasted about 30 seconds.

    1950 - Boeing SB-17G Flying Fortress, 43-39364, of the 3d Air Rescue Squadron, is heavily damaged while parked when struck by SB-17G, 43-39365, of the same unit, at Ashiya Air Base, Japan, when its hydraulics failed. The noses of both are wrecked and both are written off.

    1953 - Eight U.S. Marine Corps pilots avoid disaster when their fighters run low on fuel during a flight from Puerto Rico to a Marine Corps base near Miami, Florida. Three pilots, Capt. William H. Johnson, of Miami, Lt. Thomas D. White, of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and Lt. Forest G. Dawson, of Tucson, Arizona, are forced to ditch in the ocean due to fuel exhaustion but are rescued by nearby ships in a short time. Five other planes are forced down at Homestead AFB, Florida, S of Miami, where one, flown by Capt. Donald Edwards, of Opa-locka, Florida, overshoots the field, ending up in a canal.

    1956 – Navy Stratolab balloon (LCDRs Malcolm D. Ross and M. Lee Lewis) better world height record soaring to 76,000 feet over Black Hills, SD, on flight to gather meteorological, cosmic ray, and other scientific data.

    1982 - A United States Air Force in Europe F-4 crashed near Hannover, West Germany, both crew killed.

    1998 – Lockheed S-3B Viking, BuNo 159733, of VS-22 lands on the deck of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) at 1918 hrs. during night landing requalifications off the Virginia coast. At 1920 hrs. an EA-6B Prowler, BuNo 163885, of VAQ-130 receives a wave-off due to the deck still being fouled, but its starboard wing strikes the Viking. The Prowler continues over the side as all four crew eject, as well as two crew from the S-3. The Viking crew are recovered, but the Prowler crew are all casualties with only one body recovered. Deck fire is brought under control in seven minutes. The damaged S-3B is also jettisoned.

    2007 - A US Army UH-60 Black Hawk, operating from Aviano Air Base, Italy, crashes at 1217 hrs. near the Piave River, killing all seven on board, a mixed crew of Army and Air Force personnel. KWF are Air Force Capt. Cartize Durnham, Staff Sgt. Robert Rogers, Staff Sgt. Mark Spence, Senior Airman Kenneth Hauprich, Army Capt. Christian Skoglund and Chief Warrant Officer Two Davidangelo Alvarez. One year later, on the anniversary of the accident, members of the Aviano Air Base and Santa Lucia di Piave communities joined to unveil a special memorial honoring those U.S. military members who lost their lives in the crash and to remember those Italian World War I heroes of Piave.
     
  10. mhansen2
    Online

    mhansen2 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,260
    Thanks Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Ratings:
    +222
    9 November

    1620 – Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sight land at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

    1822 – The Action of 9 November 1822 between schooner USS Alligator and a squadron of pirate schooners off the coast of Cuba. Fifteen leagues from Matanzas, Cuba, a large band of pirates captured several vessels and held them for ransom. Upon hearing of the pirate attacks, the Alligator under Lieutenant William Howard Allen rushed to the scene to rescue the vessels and seize the pirates. Upon arriving at the bay where the pirates were said to be, USS Alligator dispatched boats to engage the enemy vessels, as the water was too shallow for the American warship to engage them herself. With Allen personally commanding one of the boats, the Americans assaulted the piratical schooner Revenge. Although the Americans were able to force the pirates into abandoning Revenge, the buccaneers managed to fight their way out of the bay and inflict heavy casualties among the Americans, including Allen. With their commander mortally wounded, the Americans ceased pursuit of the pirates but managed to recover the vessels that had been held in the bay.

    1862 – General US Grant issued orders to bar Jews from serving under him. The order was quickly rescinded.

    1862 – “Osprey” was a Confederate steamer that was captured and burned along with the J. P. Smith by sidewheel steamer USS Kinsman in Bayou Cheval, about 9 miles from Grand Lake, LA.

    1875 – Indian Inspector E.C. Watkins submits a report to Washington, D.C., stating that hundreds of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians associated with Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse are hostile to the United States. In so doing, Watkins set into motion a series of events that led to the Battle of the Little Big Born in Montana the following year. Seven years before the Watkins report, a portion of the Teton Sioux, who lived with Chief Red Cloud, made peace with the U.S. in exchange for a large reservation in the Black Hills of the Dakotas. However, some Sioux refused the offer of confinement on a reservation, and instead united around Chief Sitting Bull and his leading warrior, Crazy Horse. The wisdom of their resistance seemed confirmed in 1874 when the discovery of gold in the Black Hills set off an invasion of Anglo miners into the Sioux reservation. When the U.S. did nothing to stop this illegal violation of lands promised to the Sioux by treaty, more Indians left the reservation in disgust and joined Sitting Bull to hunt buffalo on the plains of Wyoming and Montana. In November 1875, Watkins reported that the free-roaming Indians were hostile. The government responded by ordering that the Indians “be informed that they must remove to a reservation before the 31st of January 1876,” and promised that if they refused, “they would be turned over to the War Department for punishment.” However, by the time couriers carried the message to the Sioux it was already winter and traveling 200 miles to the reservation across frozen ground with no grass for their ponies or food for themselves was an impossible request. When, as expected, the Sioux missed the deadline, the matter was turned over to the War Department. In March 1876, the former Civil War hero General Phillip Sheridan ordered a large force of soldiers to trap the Sioux and force them back to the reservations. Among the officers leading the force was George Armstrong Custer, who later that year lead his famous “last stand” against Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

    1918 - USS Saetia (ID-2317), on a voyage from Bordeaux to Philadelphia in ballast, was sunk by a mine from the German submarine U-117 (Otto Dröscher), 25 miles off Ocean City, MD. There were no casualties.

    1949 - A US Navy Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer on a training flight crash landed south of Mikkalo, Oregon, after all four engines "froze up" in flight. One fatality.

    1950 - Boeing RB-29A Superfortress, 44-61813, c/n 11290, built as a B-29A-50-MO, modified to F-13A, redesignated RB-29A, Circle X tailcode, of the 31st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, damaged by MiG-15s, during touch-down at Johnson Air Base, Japan, lands too hot and with too much nose-down attitude, overshoots runway, ends up in a cabbage patch, airframe breaks into five major portions. Small fire extinguished quickly but it is written off. Five crew died.

    1950 – Task Force 77 makes first attack on the Yalu River bridges. In his F9F Panther, LCDR William T. Amen, of VF-111 off USS Philippine Sea (CV-47), shoots down a MIG-15 and becomes first Navy pilot to shoot down a jet aircraft.

    1950 – Corporal Harry J. LaVene, a tail gunner on an RB-29 over Sinuiju, became the first aerial gunner to shoot down a MiG-15.

    1954 - North American F-100A-5-NA Super Sabre, 52-5771, c/n 192–16, crashes in Nevada, after control is lost during a gunnery test sortie. Pilot Maj. Frank N. Emory, of Mount Vernon, Washington, ejects, receiving only minor injuries. The Air Force grounds the new fighter on 10 November after this, the fifth loss of the type in just a few months. At this point, the USAF had about 70 of the aircraft. Instability problems are found to be largely due to insufficient tail area which is then increased and the design modified. The F-100 grounding order is lifted in early February 1955.

    1956 - Second prototype Martin XP6M-1 Seamaster, BuNo 138822, c/n XP-2, first flown 18 May 1956, crashes at 1536 hrs. near Odessa, Delaware, due to faulty elevator jack. As seaplane noses up at ~21,000 feet (6,400 m) and fails to respond to control inputs, crew of 4 ejects, pilot Robert S. Turner, co-pilot William Cunningham, and two crew all parachuting to safety. Airframe breaks up after falling to 6,000 feet (1,800 m) before impact.

    1957 - A Convair RB-36H-10-CF Peacemaker, 51-5745, of the 71st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, is destroyed by an explosion and groundfire at Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico, all crew members survive. This is the 32nd B-36 written-off in an accident of 385 built and will be the last operational loss before the type is retired.

    1961 – Test pilot Robert White flew the X-15 to 30,968 meters (101,606 feet) and Mach 6.04.

    1962 - Test pilot John McKay flew the X-15 to 16,444 meters (53,952 feet) and Mach 1.49. Following the launch from the B-52, McKay started the rocket engine only to discover that it produced just 30 percent of its maximum thrust. He had to make a high-speed emergency landing on Mud Lake, NV, without flaps but with a significant amount of fuel still in the aircraft. As the X-15 slid across the lakebed, the left skid collapsed; the aircraft turned sideways and flipped onto its back. McKay suffered back injuries but was eventually able to resume X-15 pilot duties, making 22 more flights. The X-15 was sent back to North American Aviation and rebuilt into the X-15A-2.


    1979 – In a nuclear false alarm, the NORAD computers and the Alternate National Military Command Center in Fort Ritchie, Maryland detected purported massive Soviet nuclear strike. After reviewing the raw data from satellites and checking the early-warning radars, the alert is cancelled.

    1989 – East German officials today opened the Berlin Wall, allowing travel from East to West Berlin. The following day, celebrating Germans began to tear the wall down. One of the ugliest and most infamous symbols of the Cold War was soon reduced to rubble that was quickly snatched up by souvenir hunters.

    1989 - A U.S. Navy LTV A-7E Corsair II of VA-205, preparing to land at Naval Air Station Atlanta, Dobbins Air Force Base, Georgia, piloted by LCDR Robert Conlyn, Jr., crashes into the Pine Village North apartment complex in Smyrna, Georgia, and bursts into flames. Two civilians killed and four injured. Conlyn, call sign Cougar, stayed with the aircraft until the last possible moment. Conlyn suffered serious injuries but survived.

    2004 - A U.S. Navy McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18C Block 51 Hornet, 165226, of VFA-131 crashed 15 miles E of Nellis AFB, Nevada, after in-flight fire and becoming uncontrollable shortly after takeoff. Pilot ejects safely.

    2016 – Two F/A-18A-20-MC Hornets of VMFA-314, 163102 and 163137, collided in midair off the coast of California. The pilot of 163102 ejected and was rescued, 163137 recovered to NAS North Island, CA.
     

Share This Page