The Food Crisis in America

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by Achilles, Dec 12, 2008.

  1. Achilles
    Offline

    Achilles Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Messages:
    17
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +0
    Currently, throughout the world people are experiencing the effects of America's recession. Many people are struggling to survive in Africa, and many other 3rd world countries, but what is often overlooked is the fact that people in America are also struggling to survive. In America the housing bubble has collapsed, many people are loosing their credit, and stocks are plummeting. So far, the outlook for our future is not too bright. The economic crisis has also caused a chain reaction - causing many people to not be able to afford food.

    One out of eight Americans cannot afford to buy food, and are relying on their local food banks for food. This crisis isn't just limited to the lower class, because now, many middle class families are also being affected. Many food banks are running out of food, and are forced to turn away many needy people.If we want to solve this ever growing problem, we must help by donating caned goods to the local food bank, start fundraisers, and food drives. We must proactive, as best as we can, because helping our own society is key to humanity's success in the world.
     
  2. Angel Heart
    Offline

    Angel Heart Conservative Hippie

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2007
    Messages:
    2,057
    Thanks Received:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Ratings:
    +341
    Every where you turn in Portland there's another can food drive. To see lacrosse games, apartment applications, to see a movie... They are held through out the year. Oregon Food Bank is a great example of food distribution.

    I'm a part of another called Gleaners. $20 a month membership, 4 hours Gleaners work each month and you get $500+ in food each month. Each membership must have an adoptee that they share their food with. An adoptee is disabled or elderly. The program buys truckloads of food on the wholesale market and distributes them to the membership.

    Oregon is a great example of how nonprofits can make a major difference.
     
  3. editec
    Offline

    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    41,427
    Thanks Received:
    5,598
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +5,617
    I drop into the local food bank once a week. I generally pick up enough bread to feed the army of young kids who seem to be showing up at my place around dinner-time

    Let me tell you, folks, the larder is getting smaller every day.

    No I mean that.

    A year ago, when the food came out, there was all sorts of stuff avaialbe.

    So much that the left over was given to a pig farmer.

    Not anymore.

    If you don't get there early?

    There's nothing left fifteen minutes after they open the doors.

    Since the grocery stores are tightening up on their just-in-time stocking, there's less waste in their system, ergo, there's less food given to the food bank.

    I have to tell you it's an interesting process to go from sitting on the board of a local food pantry to being somebody who is standing on the other side of the counter.

    Food banks and food pantries hereabouts are in trouble.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2008
  4. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,471
    Thanks Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,313
    Every year for the last five years we have been seeing an increasing number of people having to use the food banks. Yet, every year we were told that the economy was in great shape. Not only people that were chronicaly needy, but an increasing number of people from the former middle class. I don't know what will come of this as the situation worsens. It is reaching the point that the voluntary giving simply is not covering the need.

    The steel mill I work at has laid off 130 people, and I am on a 40 hr week for the first time ever. Up untill this time, I have always been in the position of trying to get a day off. They are doing their best to retain their maintenance people, but I will be surprised if I am still working come May. Looks like unemployment will segue right into Social Security.
     
  5. KittenKoder
    Offline

    KittenKoder Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Messages:
    23,281
    Thanks Received:
    1,711
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Nowhere
    Ratings:
    +1,714
    Food banks won't help in the long run, eventually they will run out anyway. We just need to fix our economy.
     

Share This Page