The 36-hour work week/3-day weekend

Discussion in 'Clean Debate Zone' started by TGN, Jul 12, 2014.

  1. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    I put about 2/3 of the front office on 4 day/10 hr work weeks.
    Productivity went up - overtime went down. People got more work done, and it cost the company less money to do so.
    It is win-win
     
  2. Mathbud1
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    Mathbud1 VIP Member

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    You do know that Wal-Mart and McDonald's don't exist in a vacuum don't you? If mega-sized corporations can afford to pay a higher wage, that means all companies can? Or is it that we don't care if smaller companies can afford it as long as we stick it to the CEO of Wal-Mart?
     
  3. Andylusion
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    Andylusion Gold Member

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    The implication here, is that it's someone else's job to make you successful.

    It's not. No one 'owes' you anything. The reason Walmart hands out information on welfare, is because people want it, and it's available to them.

    I worked at a place, where the day they hired me, they told me to get whatever government assistance, I could get. It was a small mom&pop shop.

    You leftists, are oblivious. You compare Walmart to any Mom&pop shop, their wages are always higher at Walmart.

    So when Walmart does it, paying a higher wage, well that's bad. When a mom&pop shop does it, with a much lower wage, well that's ok, because they are not evil Walmart. Idiots.

    You know that the owner of Wal-Mart and McDonalds will still be MEGA rich if they pay their employee's a better salary correct?


    How many times have we been over this? Do you people have no memory?

    If you confiscated the entire compensation package of the CEO of Walmart, or McDonalds, and distributed it to the employees, it would not even be 1/2 of a CENT per hour.

    Has public education fallen so far, that you people can't even use a Calculator?

    CEO of Walmart, $20.7 Million compensation, divided by 2.2 Million employees. That's $9.40 A YEAR. That's 0.49¢ an hour. 0.49¢... that's a little less than HALF OF A CENT, per hour. Oh that'll change people's lives....

    HELLO! That $20.7, isn't even cash. Most of it is stock options. You can't pay employees with stocks. CEO of Walmart actual Cash pay $2 Million. Divided by 2.2 Million employees. 90¢ per employee PER YEAR. 0.04¢ an hour.

    Can't you people do math? Gah.... mindless people on here.
     
  4. Andylusion
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    Andylusion Gold Member

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    I'm doing that right now... but I don't love it so much. I'm so tired by the time I get home, I usually go to bed pretty quick. As soon as I wake up in the morning, it's time to go back. Do you just like it because of the 3 days off? Or do you actually enjoy the seeming non-stop rat race through the week?
     
  5. Andylusion
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    Andylusion Gold Member

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    I don't think you grasp how economics work. "CEO does the 'right thing'".

    Why is it the 'right thing' to pay people a higher wage? That implies they deserve more. You don't deserve anything. You deserve what you can negotiate for. My existence... and the sucking of air... and the pooping... and the drinking of water, and pissing it down the drain.... does not entitle me to ANYTHING.

    The only thing I am entitled to, is whatever price I can sell my labor for.

    And see, you would grasp this, if you were the one paying it.

    You drive your car into one of those little girl scout car washes. The girl scout comes up and says "$80 please!"

    Are you going to pay $80, to have some 8 year old girls spritz your car with dirty soap water, and wipe it with an old rag, and wave as you leave all spotted?

    Of course not. Girl Scout "Why can't you do the right thing? You are going to play economic dependency on us??"

    Or the dude walking down the side walk with flowers for sale. "$50 a rose please. Do the right thing! Don't force me into economic dependency!"

    Or the guy mowing your lawn. "$100 a mow! Do the right thing! Don't force me into economic dependency!"

    Of course, you understand that their labor, isn't worth that much money to you. One semi decent rose on the road, isn't worth $50. One mowing of your lawn (unless you own several acers), isn't worth $100. One shoddy girl scout car washing, isn't worth $80.

    But what about 'doing the right thing!'. Well that doesn't apply to you.... does it?

    See, you the customer, determine how much the labor is worth. Not the CEO. The CEO has no ability to dictate how much the labor is worth.

    If the CEO could... they would say the Cashier's labor was worth $1 Million an hour. Pay them $900K an hour, pocket $100K, and charge the customer $1 Million per product.

    If the CEO could do that, they would. They would love to just deem that part-time high school students labor was worth millions. But they can't.

    Before the Airline deregulation, the Airline CEO could do this. Because the price of a ticket was mandated by the government. And because customers were forced to pay a high price, and they were subsidized by the government, the Airline pilots and stewards were paid large pay checks.

    The CEO wasn't 'doing the right thing'. He was simply paying his employees, what their labor was worth. Because the customer was paying more, their labor was worth more, and thus they were paid more. That's all there is to it.

    Walmart can't pay their employees more. If they did, they would have to charge the customer more. If they charged the customer more, the customers would go someplace else.

    There is only one reason I go to Walmart. I don't like super mega stores, because I can't ever seem to find what I want. Too big. Too much stuff. Five minute hikes are for nature trails, not trying to find 2-liters of Dr. Pepper.

    The only reason I go there... is price. I was looking for a vacuum sweeper a few years back. I went to my local store, and it was $79. I decided to check walmart which was just on the other side of the street. It was $42. I bought from Walmart. If it wasn't that much cheaper all the time... I wouldn't buy from there. No customers, and now all your employees who you think should be paid more, will be paid ZERO.

    Which is worse.... $9/hr, or ZERO?
     
  6. Andylusion
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    Andylusion Gold Member

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    Everyone falls in line?

    See this is another aspect, that people just don't grasp.

    You will NEVER be very wealthy working a straight 40 hours.

    If you want to have real money, it is going to take real time. No one makes big money, working just a mere 40-hours. NO ONE.

    CEOs don't work a mere 40 hours. Are you kidding? My CEO works 7 AM to 6 PM, Monday through Friday, and sometimes on the Weekend.

    I've known many CEOs. I worked at an IT Consulting place, and the CEO was there before I arrived every morning, and was there long after I left.

    That Honda guy that quit and opened his own consulting firm, he's working more than he ever did at Honda. But that's why he's wealthy.

    One of my co-workers I knew, got a job working for Xerox, and his base pay was $60,000. But.... they told him up front, he would be working 60-hours a week at the end of every month. 3-weeks 40, 1 week 60, every month.

    When you say "absolutely vital that we all agree on the optimal number of hours to work each week and then pass laws to ensure that everyone falls in line", you are basically saying "I want to mandate everyone is poor".
     
  7. beagle9
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    beagle9 Gold Member

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    Are you not embarrassed of yourself yet ?
     
  8. Mathbud1
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    Mathbud1 VIP Member

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    Why would he be embarrassed?
     
  9. Andylusion
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    Andylusion Gold Member

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    Why should I be embarrassed, when I'm right? You are the one that is economically ignorant. If anyone should be embarrassed, it would be you.
     
  10. TGN
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    TGN Pacifist Egalitarian

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    Interesting, the Kellog company actually had a 6 hour workday all the way up until the mid-80s when it was finally phased out. The idea was that it was cheaper to have fewer workers working longer hours due to benefit expenses. I guess that means they would've kept it otherwise. Maybe Basic Income can be a partial solution, in that it could reduce benefits and insurance costs for employers, who could then afford to hire more workers to work 12 hour production schedules split into two 6 hour shifts? It could increase productivity (as a happy worker is a productive one) and also reduce unemployment as an added benefit to society.

    When America Came This Close to Establishing a 30-Hour Workweek Alternet

    "In 1992, I traveled with Hunnicutt to interview former thirty-hour week workers in Battle Creek. They spoke movingly of the free time they had when they worked shorter hours—'you weren’t all wore out when you got home,' one man told me. One couple, Chuck and Joy Blanchard, who had both worked at the plant, claimed that the six-hour day made Chuck a 'feminist' long before the women’s movement. He and his wife shared the housework and he was a 'room parent' at his children’s school."
     

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