Raised bed vs in ground gardening

Discussion in 'Gardening and Landscaping' started by JustAnotherNut, Sep 2, 2018.

  1. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    Both have their own set of advantages and disadvantages.

    Since we moved to this house 20 years ago, I started with a few raised beds mainly because of the hard rocky soil. Within a couple of years and the kids being born, I felt the pathways between the beds were wasted garden space and took them out. After expanding & building the soil it's now approximately 25x60 ft and I grow much of our food. Though harvests have been a challenge since I can't keep up with the weeding & care of it. Not to mention the physical challenges. So I am looking into building raised beds again and possibly planting grass in the pathways that can be cut and used either as mulch, added to the compost or as litter in the chicken coop. That way the pathways are 'useful'.



    Do you have raised beds? Or in ground garden? What do you think of your method and how has it worked for you? Any suggestions or cautions?
     
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  2. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    I like to repurpose stuff so last year when I was first contemplating raised beds, I was looking for ideas and came across this video using pallets...…



    We had plenty of pallets, but the cross boards like she uses didn't look all that sturdy to me. So the pallets have since turned into firewood for the winter. We also had a pile of lumber from numerous previous projects and I found several 2x6's. I cut them to 18" and built a 4x8 bed and topped it with 2x4's, filled it with soil and compost and planted a few asparagus crowns and tomatoes (great companions, btw) and now the asparagus has already out grown the bed so I'll have to figure out something else for them.
    Anyway, the bed has worked great and has made it easy to care for the plantings and I can sit on the edge while doing it. I've also just finished a second one and as space is made available as the garden winds down, I'll get it set into place & filled. I still have enough to do 1/2 to 3/4's of another bed and I'm hoping we can take out our deck before too long, that will provide enough to finish a 3rd bed and probably do a 4th. Plus the 2x10's or 2x12's (not sure which) that make up the frame will also be put to use for more.
     
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  3. Pogo
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    I did some experimenting with raised beds for the same reason, way too many rocks. It depends on what you're growing and how much you raise, so carrots are pretty much out.

    I quit doing that though because there's too much wildlife that comes to visit from the national forest in my back yard -- deer, rabbits, bears, raccoons --- so if I grow veggies now it's in pots.
     
  4. Tipsycatlover
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    Tipsycatlover Gold Member

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    If animals are eating your vegetables get some cheap forks, even plastic ones will work. Stick them among your vegetables tines up.

    A friend had a backyard garden and Los Angeles being overrun with rats, had rats eating her vege until she used the forks.
     
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  5. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    Why not fence the area and use the raised beds? You'd be surprised at how much you can grow, especially with companion &/or square foot &/or intensive planting methods.
     
  6. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    Thanks for the great idea. I wonder how it would work with squirrels too
     
  7. Pogo
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    Because the fences would have to be at least eight feet high and that was more work than I was willing to put in or had time to.

    So one day I looked out my window and there's a rabbit standing there. I can hear his thoughts, he's thinking "wow it all looks so good I don't know where to start".

    I walks up behind the rabbit and I sez "can I help you?"

    Rabbit sez "yeah, what's the special today? What do you recommend?"

    I sez "I recommend you git chore ass a-movin' before I kick you over the creek" and he runned away.

    The next day I hear this clumping sound. I look out, and at the same spot where the rabbit was, there's now a horse. And the horse is thinking "wow it all looks so good...."

    I poked my head out the door and went "HEY!"

    Horse put his head down and walked away to chew on some weeds.

    Always sump'm.
     
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  8. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    Another idea that I've seen becoming popular is using metal stock tanks as raised beds. You'd probably have to cut some drain holes in the bottom but being fairly tall, and slick sided, it should keep the smaller critters out. A good strong tall fence would keep the deer out
     
  9. JustAnotherNut
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    Another idea to keep the deer out is to cover the bed with some poultry fencing???
     
  10. Pogo
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    I had chicken wire up for a time. It's not enough to keep deer out.

    Let alone the occasional horse.
     

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