Quick question about "Corporations as people"

Discussion in 'Politics' started by amrchaos, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. amrchaos
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    amrchaos Pentheus torn apart

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    Here is a question I have about "Corporations as people"

    What is their citizenship? Could foreigners buy corporations and gain access to our political system through the SC ruling? Also, what was the SC ruling so I can look it up.


    Thanks to all that help me answer these question.
     
  2. The Infidel
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    The Infidel EVIL CONSERVATIVE

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    Corps are made up of people.
     
  3. amrchaos
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    amrchaos Pentheus torn apart

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    I've got that--but what about their citizenship?
     
  4. occupied
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    occupied Gold Member

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    Anyone can give money to a superpac. Direct contributions are becoming a thing of the past, a mere drop in the bucket of total spending and the only kind still tightly regulated.
     
  5. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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    I'm voting for APPLE COMPUTERS in US Senate Race
     
  6. The Infidel
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    The Infidel EVIL CONSERVATIVE

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    They work for corporations :dunno:
     
  7. JackLandsman
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    JackLandsman Barry Soetero’s kid

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    Of course corporations are "made of people". The issue, however, is that in this country corporations as entities are considered persons. This is because of the Supreme Court's historically corporatist reading of the Fourteenth Amendment. It's bunk of course. Hopefully we can do away with corporate personhood this century.
     
  8. Katzndogz
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    Katzndogz Diamond Member

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    If a corporation is incorporated under the laws of a state, they have the rights of corporate citizens under that state's laws. Corporations do not have the right to vote. Foreigners who come here and become naturalized under our federal laws have the right to vote. Would you deny the right to vote to all those naturalized citizens? Suppose foreigners came here specifically to become naturalized citizens and vote themselves benefits under our system. Would you deny them the right as voters to do just that?
     
  9. midcan5
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    midcan5 liberal / progressive

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    Weird I was just debating this and wrote a few thoughts. The video from MIT below is excellent. Here: http://video.mit.edu/watch/democracy-after-citizens-united-9635/

    A few observations.

    The problem with CU is it assumes a corporation is a definable entity, and as such acts in a manner that makes sense in the way in which we consider a person for instance to act. Corporate goals rarely align with society's goals, or even with a nation's goals. Corporations exist to make money for their stock holders and executives. Persons exist as individuals, as recognizable responsible agents. Corporations operate outside the democratic framework that individuals operate under. Corporations operate equally well under communism as under democracy, they also operate across borders with resources and policies that differ from place to place. Funds from overseas operations then can enter and provide monies that influence local politics, and even transnational politics, by creating and funding ads and other various media that manages the idea landscape. CU gave enormous power to money that comes from anywhere to control media in our democracy with no responsible agent or clear understanding of who benefits, how, or why they benefit.

    OT Unions suffer the same sort of dilemma but unions operate locally and specifically, when I was in a union I often disagreed with their decisions or policies. But I was also a recipient of the benefits of the union and having seen the manner in which corporations treat workers through mergers and benefit fights, I see unions as I see lawyers, a wall against empty greed and corporate irresponsibility.

    "Corporate propaganda directed outwards, that is, to the public at large, has two main objectives: to identify the free enterprise system in popular consciousness with every cherished value, and to identify interventionist governments and strong unions (the only agencies capable of checking a complete domination of society by corporations) with tyranny, oppression and even subversion. The techniques used to achieve these results are variously called 'public relations', 'corporate communications' and 'economic education'." Alex Carey 'Taking the Risk out of Democracy' [see also [http://video.mit.edu/watch/democracy-after-citizens-united-9635/]Home | MIT Video[/url] ]


    "Historian Phillips-Fein traces the hidden history of the Reagan revolution to a coterie of business executives, including General Electric official and Reagan mentor Lemuel Boulware, who saw labor unions, government regulation, high taxes and welfare spending as dire threats to their profits and power. From the 1930s onward, the author argues, they provided the money, organization and fervor for a decades-long war against New Deal liberalism—funding campaigns, think tanks, magazines and lobbying groups, and indoctrinating employees in the virtues of unfettered capitalism." [ame=http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Hands-Making-Conservative-Movement/dp/0393059308/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8]Amazon.com: Invisible Hands: The Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan (9780393059304): Kim Phillips-Fein: Books[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2012
  10. Katzndogz
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    Katzndogz Diamond Member

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    That will never happen. Nor would you like it if it did. Corporate personhood has nothing to do with the 14th Amendment.

    Recognizing a corporation as a legal person was the way the state imposed responsibilities of groups of individuals organized for a common enterprise. Up until then, which was the latter part of the 19th century, there was no recognition of corporate personhood and no way to control those corporations. For instance, liberals LOVE the way environmental laws have been used against corporations to force them to stop polluting. This couldn't be done without the legal personhood of corporations. Nor could the corporation be forced to pay to clean up a toxic site. Without legal personhood, a corporation would have no responsibility if it defrauded an investor, nor would there be any deep corporate pockets for the negligent acts of its employees. Nor would there by any corporate taxes at all.

    So, removing legal personhood from corporations isn't going to happen.
     

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