Question about annuities...please help

Discussion in 'Stock Market' started by Lucky#13, Sep 20, 2010.

  1. Lucky#13
    Offline

    Lucky#13 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Messages:
    54
    Thanks Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +10
    I know very little about retirement options such as annuities and IRA's. I know some of the basics but thats about it. My mom who is currently 61 was laid off from her job of 37 years but still recieved her pension in one lump sum of around $250,000. My dad had this money transfered into a regular IRA and it is just sitting there. My dad decided it might be best to put the money into an annuity so he called a financial advisor and he recommended a john hancock annuity called "john hancock venture opportunity" annuity. This is all the money my parents have for retirement. I don't know what to do but after reading about annuities it seems they have really high fees. I am also worried that after they die that john hancock will keep the remainder of the balance. Can anybody please help. I am so worried that they are going to make a bad decision and funny enough put me in charge of doing some research. My dad has a meeting with the joohn hancock rep on sept 30th. Do you guys think that this type of annuity is a good thing? What happens to the account balance if they were to die? I am thoroughly confused. Please excuse my ignorance and try not to make fun of it. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Madeline
    Offline

    Madeline BANNED

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    18,505
    Thanks Received:
    1,624
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Cleveland. Feel mah pain.
    Ratings:
    +1,624
    Lucky, there a many different kinds of annuities...but yes, most all have high fees. They are insurance products, and most have both a cash value and a "payable" value (meaning what they are projected to be worth if they remain in force). These are complex instruments, and should not be bought until all the characteristics are understood.

    Generally speaking, it's unwise to use only one investment to hold a person's entire retirement savings. Even if the annuity is desirable, the investment should probably be less than 1/3 of the amount and the balance in stocks and the like.

    There are some terrificly talented finance people on USMB who may help you, but if you cannot wait I recommend SuzeOrman.com for further research.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  3. Lucky#13
    Offline

    Lucky#13 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Messages:
    54
    Thanks Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +10
    Well thank you very much. You guys don't know how much I appreciate any kind of help. I have been up all night doing research and looking at the pros and cons. The annuity that john hancock offers charges a 3.5% sales charge up front and that seems like alot. Also noticed that annuities are taxed as income but mutual funds are taxed at capital gains rates. The problem I see with a mutual fund is it can lose money but the annuity guarantees that the principal will never be lost but the fees and charges are outrageous. I will go to suzeorman.com and see what I can find. Thank you so much for your time.
     
  4. Madeline
    Offline

    Madeline BANNED

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    18,505
    Thanks Received:
    1,624
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Cleveland. Feel mah pain.
    Ratings:
    +1,624
    You are welcome...and I believe that site lists financial advisors, or describes a way to find one you can rely on. Might be worth a few hundred bucks to get personalized advice just for this point in time.
     
  5. midcan5
    Offline

    midcan5 liberal / progressive

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    10,783
    Thanks Received:
    2,365
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Location:
    Philly, PA
    Ratings:
    +3,295
    Check into whether and how much the annuity is insured for in your state. We have one as part of our retirement fund. Rates are pretty good right now. I am talking to an investment person tomorrow and will run your question by them.

    Annuity Rates in 2010 lowest for 20 years
     
  6. asterism
    Offline

    asterism Congress != Progress

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Messages:
    8,592
    Thanks Received:
    906
    Trophy Points:
    190
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Ratings:
    +1,073
    A better option for retirement funds at that age could be a mix of federal and tax free municipal bonds. Those are what traditional investment advisors recommend for money needed to generate income now. Be vary wary of high yield munis since they are higher risk.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  7. midcan5
    Offline

    midcan5 liberal / progressive

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    10,783
    Thanks Received:
    2,365
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Location:
    Philly, PA
    Ratings:
    +3,295
    Another piece that may help. Talk to others, and take your time making a decision is best advice.


    Variable Annuities
    A variable annuity is essentially an insurance contract joined at the hip with an investment product. Annuities function as tax-deferred savings vehicles with insurance-like properties; they use an insurance policy to provide the tax deferral. The insurance contract and investment product combine to offer the following features:

    1. Tax deferral on earnings.
    2. Ability to name beneficiaries to receive the balance remaining in the account on death.
    3. "Annuitization"--that is, the ability to receive payments for life based on your life expectancy.
    4. The guarantees provided in the insurance component.

    "Now it's time for some cautionary words about the purchase of annuities. Many experts feel that annuities are a poor choice for most people when examined in close detail. The following discussion compares an annuity to an index fund (see also the article on index funds elsewhere in this FAQ)."

    Invest FAQ: Insurance: Annuities
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
  8. Madeline
    Offline

    Madeline BANNED

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    18,505
    Thanks Received:
    1,624
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Cleveland. Feel mah pain.
    Ratings:
    +1,624
    Here's a nuance to note: If a state has a guarantee fund for annunities, does it protect the payable value or the cash value? In many "variable annuities", meaning annuities whose performance is tied to the stock market, the guarantee usually only runs to the cash value...and in a new product (one you have not held long) that cash value might be less than 10% of the initial premium.

    Also, never buy any insurance product SOLELY for the alleged tax advantages, especially not with retirement assets. If it is going to be used as an investment, evaluate as an investment. Tax advantages can be had in a variety of different planning scenarios; tax sheltering already tax exempt or tax sheltered income makes absolutely no sense.
     
  9. Lucky#13
    Offline

    Lucky#13 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Messages:
    54
    Thanks Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +10
    Thank you guys again for the help. Reps to all of you. I am still doing the research and welcome as much input as you guys feel free to share. Thanks again.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  10. midcan5
    Offline

    midcan5 liberal / progressive

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    10,783
    Thanks Received:
    2,365
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Location:
    Philly, PA
    Ratings:
    +3,295
    Follow up from my comment above. The recommended portion of a portfolio according to the money manager I spoke to is 30%. Reason is fluidity and diversification. Ours grew 2.5% in four months and requires minimum commitment of four years. But we did a smaller amount to gauge results. I specifically asked about John Hancock and got, 'they used to be good, but got in trouble in '08' as many did - take that with the usual grain of salt. Ours is in Jackson by the way, we are currently eligible for 5% yearly withdrawal. https://www.jackson.com/Index.jsp

    The piece below is interesting (May 2008???), but '85' for the one plan seems a bit extreme unless you still carry a mortgage etc at that age. My mom is near 90 but since 85 or so just doesn't do what she once did, so lots of money is sorta meaningless - she doesn't have lots anyway lol. But thank the Dems for medicare even though I can see it is abused for the old timers in lots of ways, but mom has needed it recently even though she is a tough old codger.

    The question for me would be, does this fit into [your] lifestyle, our portfolio is diversified with what is considered moderate conservative, but even in this category it fluctuates. Talk to lots, they'd love to take your money, but you can eventually learn best choices.

    Living Long, Living Well

    "To find out the latest in offerings, we turned to The Hartford, John Hancock and New York Life to see what their most recent product introductions in this space look like and which investors might benefit from insuring for longevity.

    The Hartford is offering two products, Hartford Income Security (HIS is their pure longevity insurance product, which begins payouts at age 85) and the Hartford Income Annuity (HIA), which allows investors to begin taking income at their discretion, beginning at age 65. “We’ve seen a lot of interest recently in all guaranteed-payout products given the market recently,” says Scott Sanderson, vice president of marketing at The Hartford. “We’ve all seen the numbers, but it really hits home when you see friends or family who have retired at the wrong time. If you take more than 4.5% or 5% out of your regular retirement accounts annually and live a long life, you’re going to run out of money, especially if you retire at the wrong time.”

    The HIS product answers “the challenge to provide pure longevity insurance, and we think the best deal is the product in its purest form.” The payouts begin at age 85 and the elections you make regarding payouts are irrevocable, but you can buy a “facility care” rider that will allow you to begin taking payouts early if you certify you need facility-based care."

    Since payouts on both products are identical at age 85 (when the HIS product kicks in), it really makes sense to use the HIA product, which gives investors earlier access to their money. So, what will The Hartford pay a man who at age 65 invests $100,000? Depending on when the man starts payments, here’s what he’ll get for the rest of his life:

    • Starting at age 65, $681 a month;
    • Starting at age 75, $1,800 a month;
    • Starting at age 85,• $7,638 a month."
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
annuities forums
,
annuitize john hancock venture annuity
,
how does john hancock venture 111 annuitie work
,

john hancock annuities ratings

,
john hancock annuities reviews
,
john hancock variable annuities
,
john hancock venture vantage
,
john hancock venture vantage annuity
,
john hancock venture vantage ppfl
,

variable annuity discussion board

,
with john hancock variable annuity will beneficiaries receive the rest of money once i annuitize