Parent's call to ban sweets in school gets the raspberry

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by -Cp, Apr 14, 2005.

  1. -Cp
    Offline

    -Cp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Messages:
    2,911
    Thanks Received:
    360
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Earth
    Ratings:
    +363
    Uptight mom starts a cupcake war in her son's kindergarten class, seeking to ban the sweets for all, because she apparently can't be bothered to teach her son self-restraint and moderation. What's left of childhood surrenders


    The food fight started after the birthday girl came with doughnuts.

    And then the star student came with Twinkies.

    The health-conscious mother had seen enough. She fired off a mass e-mail to the parents of other children in her son's kindergarten class, calling for a truce on these treats, saying they are adding to the national epidemic of child obesity.

    Meredith Roth said the Millburn School District should put an end to the time-honored practice of bringing in cupcakes or candy to celebrate holidays and birthdays.

    Some of the parents of other South Mountain Elementary School kids said Roth should keep her child-rearing philosophies to herself.

    It all came to a head Tuesday night, when parents gathered for a PTO meeting. The discussion about sweets turned into a bitter debate over whether junk food should be banned.

    "There are roughly 20 birthdays a year, and you have all these Hallmark holidays, and it's just excessive," Roth said of the food being brought into school.

    Many parents told Roth that if she didn't want her kids to eat junk food in school, she should teach them self-restraint.

    "I believe every parent has the responsibility to teach their children proper eating habits in accordance with their values and their lifestyle," said Jane Gomez, co-president of the Parent-Teacher Organization. "I teach my children moderation. I think moderation is the best philosophy, and if you teach your children respect and discipline, that will serve them in their entire life."

    Roth, 36, moved with her husband and two children from Atlanta a year ago and has advocated healthy eating in the schools. But some are saying she barged into their neighborhood, flaunting her statistics on obesity and disrespecting the way things are done in this tight, well-to-do community.

    "She's caused an incredible amount of hard feelings in the way she's dealt with people," said Gomez. "People are very angry that she does not live in this community permanently and she's a renter. And people are angry that she's dictating what people can and cannot do at home."

    Millburn School Superintendent Richard Brodow said the district is not considering Roth's request. "As far as I'm concerned, there are many more important issues that we're dealing with than cupcakes," said Brodow.

    Such bans have been tried elsewhere in the county. Last year, Chandler School in Duxbury, Mass., about 40 miles southeast of Boston, barred goodies. Texas -- where, according to state statistics, almost a quarter of the children are obese -- banished cupcakes and other baked sweets from school birthday celebrations throughout the state in 2004, but then backed off because of controversy.

    In Millburn, parents who oppose Roth's proposal say obesity is not a problem.

    "I think a bigger problem in this community is anorexia and bulimia," said Gomez.

    Earlier this year, Roth raised concerns about the school lunch program run by the PTO. Millburn does not participate in the state lunch program and offers three lunches to students through the PTO: pizza, chicken tenders, or a plain bagel with cream cheese or butter.

    Many parents pack additional food for their children.

    In the fall, Roth organized a monthlong pilot program with Whole Foods Market. Veggie lasagna, turkey sloppy joes, organic turkey hot dogs and black bean burritos were on the new menu. They did not prove popular with students. The PTO stuck with chicken, pizza and bagel lunches.

    Roth continued to campaign for healthier alternatives in the schools. The breaking point, though, came last week. First her son was offered a doughnut to celebrate a birthday. Days later, another student brought in Twinkies because he was the "star student," a weekly program that allows kids to bring in their favorite snack.

    Then a school consultant promised to bring Starburst candy for the children next week. That was too much for Roth, who fired off e-mail messages to parents, noting that 40 percent of sixth-graders in New Jersey are overweight.

    The response was icy.

    "Personally I am getting tired of hearing about your family's health and social issues," said an e-mail from Uta M. Cicalese. "I would much prefer that you deal with them behind the closed doors of your home."

    Cicalese said her husband, Carmen, wrote the e-mail but she agrees with everything it said.

    "If a kid can't have a cupcake when they're a kid," said Maureen Lewton, "then when can they have a cupcake?"




    http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-21/111345463829760.xml
     
  2. 5stringJeff
    Offline

    5stringJeff Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,990
    Thanks Received:
    536
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Puyallup, WA
    Ratings:
    +540
    :clap: :clap: :clap:

    This guy should be hunted down and given the Presidential Common Sense award!
     
  3. manu1959
    Offline

    manu1959 Left Coast Isolationist

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Messages:
    13,761
    Thanks Received:
    1,625
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    california
    Ratings:
    +1,626
    Many parents told Roth that if she didn't want her kids to eat junk food in school, she should teach them self-restraint.

    game set match :hail:
     
  4. JOKER96BRAVO
    Offline

    JOKER96BRAVO Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,433
    Thanks Received:
    285
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +285
    In all fairness, that's hard to do with a 5 year old.
    Plus you have another grown up telling them it's ok
    when mom and dad aren't around.
    The school should be a little more
    concerned with teaching proper health IMO.
     
  5. -Cp
    Offline

    -Cp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Messages:
    2,911
    Thanks Received:
    360
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Earth
    Ratings:
    +363

    No, actually it's not hard to do w/ a 5yr old - I know cause I've raised 4 kids that were all 5 once... :D
     
  6. JOKER96BRAVO
    Offline

    JOKER96BRAVO Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,433
    Thanks Received:
    285
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +285
    At that age, they tend to follow the "last order given" (from my experience).
    "Another adult that is in charge of me said it's ok..... Alright, I'll have one."

    Shit I sound like a freakin Lib today.
     
  7. -Cp
    Offline

    -Cp Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Messages:
    2,911
    Thanks Received:
    360
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Earth
    Ratings:
    +363

    ROFL! You do.. but that's okay.. .hehe

    Acutally, if you spank your kids - as we do - they know to listen to their parents over any other adult... :D
     
  8. JOKER96BRAVO
    Offline

    JOKER96BRAVO Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    4,433
    Thanks Received:
    285
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +285
    "When the cats away....."

    "What they don't know..."

    but then again... "Curiousity...."

    I see what you mean Cp, I just think the school really should focus on
    health a little more to enforce what parents teach. You trust them to teach
    them about STDs =, why not any other important health factors?
     

Share This Page