One of many questions Democrats can’t dare answer honestly....

Discussion in 'Immigration/Illegal Immigration' started by BrokeLoser, Aug 27, 2018.

  1. BrokeLoser
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    BrokeLoser Gold Member

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    Who cleaned hotel rooms before the wetback invasion?
     
  2. Taz
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    Taz Gold Member

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    You'd still have to bring in immigrants to do certain jobs, maybe even more legal immigrants, which is ok with me, and would be a better system than the current free for all system.
     
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  3. Correll
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    Correll Diamond Member

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    Wow. YOu totally just proved him right.
     
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  4. Coyote
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    Coyote Varmint Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    It is misetable hot backbreaking work at low wages. The same housing and benefits apply. Americans dont want to do it.
     
  5. eagle1462010
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    eagle1462010 Platinum Member

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    They were in Barracks.........old military style........weren't allowed to go home........Work is not supposed to be a summer camp.........

    Yes........it's hot dirty work..........low pay.........but you are foolish to say that Americans didn't do it before..........I read it........it was destined to fail.

    Now some growers reward greatly for those who can pick fast.........Some making some good money with work incentives......

    Doesn't matter anyway..........there is a legal way to do it........those not doing it the legal way..........are illegal....and under those programs there are protections for the workers........not so when they hire illegals......

    Which part of illegal don't you understand.........
     
  6. eagle1462010
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    eagle1462010 Platinum Member

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    The death of the American dream for family farmers

    A handful of large agricultural corporations with monopoly power control an excessive amount of the market, allowing them to dictate prices farmers receive and the terms of any contractual business relationship between them. Secretary Perdue killed the rule that would have removed some of the enormous hurdles that prevent family farmers from seeking justice by taking legal action against agriculture monopolies when they engage in predatory and retaliatory practices.

    This sort of egregious and anticompetitive behavior takes place because of today’s unprecedented vertical integration and monopsony power in agricultural markets – in other words, a large percentage of family farmers only have one buyer for their products. That means that these enormous companies not only dictate the terms of business to squeeze family farmers to the max, but also have the power to put them out of business overnight if they complain or speak out – a power that they threaten to use liberally. And now Perdue’s decision not to enforce the law all but ensures there is nothing that family farmers can do about it.

    o be sure, increasing concentration and control in agricultural markets by a handful of giant corporations have played a large part in the dramatic decline in both the number and well-being of America’s family farmers. Over the last 40 years, more than a million family farmers have quit the business. Incomes have plummeted; a 2001 study found more than 7 in 10poultry farmers, for example, live beneath the poverty line, and are often effectively forced into unsustainable debt to meet the terms of their contracts. But these harmful effects go beyond independent farmers themselves, spilling over into rural areas that suffer both economically and culturally when these anchors of the community are lost.

    continue reading ........this article actually hits Tump........

    Most of the farming is done by large corporations........the small farmers have been wiped out over time.......and they want to use cheap illegal labor and not follow the law.
     
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  7. eagle1462010
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    eagle1462010 Platinum Member

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    America: Becoming a Land Without Farmers

    USDA’s rural America: get big or get out
    The tragedy of black farmers, including small white family farmers, does not exist in official statistics. According to the 2002 Census of Agriculture the picture of rural America has not changed much in the last quarter of the twenty century: In 1974 the United States had 2,314,013 farms and in 2002 there were still more than two million farms in America. Exactly: 2,128,892 farms.

    The other finding of the USDA census was that the average farm hardly changed in size. In 1974 the average was 440 acres. That size became 491 acres in 1992 and then 441 in 2002. Even the number of the largest farms did not change that much. In 1974 there were 62,225 farms of 2,000 acres or more and in 2002 those giant farms numbered 77,970.

    This apparent stasis, however, conceals a dramatic increase in the number of very wealthy farmers. In 1974, for example, there were 11,412 farms, which earned $500,000 or more. But, by 2002, the number of super-farms making $500,000 or more was 70,642. Three percent of the farms making $500,000 or more shared 62 percent of total sales and government payments. Wealthier even than these were 29,862 farms making one million dollars or more from sales and government subsidies.

    Meanwhile, at the other end of the spectrum, thirty-five percent of America’s farmers in 2002 were completely impoverished. These farmers earned less than $2,500, which, in 2002, represented one percent of sales and government payments. Like the increase of billionaire Americans, this divergence in incomes is the outcome of decades-long agricultural policies.
     
  8. eagle1462010
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    eagle1462010 Platinum Member

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    The Globalist killed small farms.............They control the markets.......and get all the handouts.......grants......subsidies...........the little farms......

    WHO TEND TO PICK their own crops......more than the giants...........get nothing.................

    These big boys who keep repeating the jobs Americans will not do............Have driven the the ones that did out of business...........these big boys want CHEAP ILLEGAL LABOR...so they don't have to play by the rules..............

    Sounds familiar with our corrupt gov't of Crony Capitalism. Pick and choose the winners and screw everyone else.

    By doing this...........they even get to screw the illegal workers........hold their non legal status over their heads.........to make sure they don't have to pay much.....
     
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  9. eagle1462010
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    eagle1462010 Platinum Member

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    Exploitation and Abuse at the Chicken Plant

    A Guatemalan immigrant, Osiel was just weeks past his seventeenth birthday, too young by law to work in a factory. A year earlier, after gang members shot his mother and tried to kidnap his sisters, he left his home, in the mountainous village of Tectitán, and sought asylum in the United States. He got the job at Case Farms with a driver’s license that said his name was Francisco Sepulveda, age twenty-eight. The photograph on the I.D. was of his older brother, who looked nothing like him, but nobody asked any questions.

    Osiel sanitized the liver-giblet chiller, a tublike contraption that cools chicken innards by cycling them through a near-freezing bath, then looked for a ladder, so that he could turn off the water valve above the machine. As usual, he said, there weren’t enough ladders to go around, so he did as a supervisor had shown him: he climbed up the machine, onto the edge of the tank, and reached for the valve. His foot slipped; the machine automatically kicked on. Its paddles grabbed his left leg, pulling and twisting until it snapped at the knee and rotating it a hundred and eighty degrees, so that his toes rested on his pelvis. The machine “literally ripped off his left leg,” medical reports said, leaving it hanging by a frayed ligament and a five-inch flap of skin. Osiel was rushed to Mercy Medical Center, where surgeons amputated his lower leg.

    Back at the plant, Osiel’s supervisors hurriedly demanded workers’ identification papers. Technically, Osiel worked for Case Farms’ closely affiliated sanitation contractor, and suddenly the bosses seemed to care about immigration status. Within days, Osiel and several others—all underage and undocumented—were fired.

    Case Farms has built its business by recruiting some of the world’s most vulnerable immigrants, who endure harsh and at times illegal conditions that few Americans would put up with. When these workers have fought for higher pay and better conditions, the company has used their immigration status to get rid of vocal workers, avoid paying for injuries, and quash dissent. Thirty years ago, Congress passed an immigration law mandating fines and even jail time for employers who hire unauthorized workers, but trivial penalties and weak enforcement have allowed employers to evade responsibility. Under President Obama, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agreed not to investigate workers during labor disputes. Advocates worry that President Trump, whose Administration has targeted unauthorized immigrants, will scrap those agreements, emboldening employers to simply call ice anytime workers complain.
     
  10. Tax Man
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    Tax Man Gold Member

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    The US would be far safer if conservatives were outlawed.
     

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