New Kentucky Governor Restores Voting Rights for More Than 100,000 People

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Dana7360, Dec 12, 2019.

  1. Dana7360
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    Dana7360 Platinum Member

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    This is very good news. The last governor took over one hundred of thousands off the rolls by taking their voting rights from them that the governor before him gave back to them.

    The governors that restored voting rights are democratic.

    The governor that took away voting rights was republican.

    So now 100 thousand Kentucky citizens will have the right to vote next year.

    That's very good news.

    I hope all of them go out and vote.


    US voting rights: Governor lifts lifetime ban on voting for more than 100,000 former felons in Kentucky
     
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  2. C_Clayton_Jones
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    C_Clayton_Jones Diamond Member

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    And in Florida, Republicans continue to obstruct restoring voting rights in violation of the will of the people.
     
  3. OKTexas
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    OKTexas Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    So what does the KY law say?

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  4. Vastator
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    It’s the correct move yet falls short...
     
  5. Dana7360
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    Dana7360 Platinum Member

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    How does it fall short?
     
  6. Vastator
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    It falls short of full rights restoration, which is an admission of failure of the justice system to adequately render appropriate punishments for a given crime.
     
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  7. OKTexas
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    OKTexas Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Yeah, let's go soft on felons, what could possibly go wrong? NYC is going soft on criminals and their murder rate is up 8%.

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  8. williepete
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    williepete Platinum Member

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    Part of your punishment of being a felon is losing your privilege to vote.

    Please explain why you would want a felon to vote. This is a person who has demonstrated he/she is incapable of rational thought or impulse control.

    So of course if they vote, they will vote left. Don't bother answering. Next: Let 16-year-olds to vote. Promise them free cars.
     
  9. Vastator
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    Who said anything about going soft? And the term “felon” rings hollow. Especially when used by those who don’t even know what it means. But I’ll save you the trouble of looking it up. A felon is a person who has been found guilty of a crime in which the sentence could result in more than one year of incarceration. One year plus one day... Viola! “Felon” That’s it....

    The convicted doesn’t even have to actually have served that one year plus. Only the possibility of such punishment need exist. Nor does the designation in anyway refer the the severity or type of infraction. Nor is there standardization of sentencing amongst all the states. It makes no distinction between the granny who wrote a bum check 40 years ago, and a serial killer like Jeffery Dahmer.

    The Felon label is a retarded standard by which to discriminate against voters, and is frankly unconstitutional. What may be a felony in one state, may not even be a crime in another. But run afoul of that law in one state..? And suddenly you can’t vote in any state? Kinda steps on the toes of others states rights of self determination. And that’s not even broaching the topic of being shut out of Federal election for a state crime. Then there’s the problem of taxation without representation. Oddly enough, a while back there was a war started over exactly that transgression...

    The real problem is the completely ineffective method of the one size fits all punishment system we use.

    If your primary concern is that these people will vote for “the other guy”; then get better ideas to campaign on...
     
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    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
  10. OKTexas
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    The States shouldn't have uniform laws or standardized sentencing. Each State has it's own priorities and are free to govern accordingly. I guess you don't understand the concept of federalism. The KY Constitution bars all felons from voting for life, it does however have a provision for gubernatorial pardons to give relief. This mass relief (ala maobamas DACA program) just shits on the State Constitution and the citizens of the State. But hey, you commies have always been about short cutting Constitutions and the rule of law. Why not go to the trouble of changing the State Constitution and do it the right way?

    .
     
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