More than 4k inmates in Ca are serving life for non violent crimes

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Dissent, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Dissent
    Offline

    Dissent BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,131
    Thanks Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    FEMA region 4
    Ratings:
    +214
  2. grunt11b
    Offline

    grunt11b VIP Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2011
    Messages:
    4,649
    Thanks Received:
    500
    Trophy Points:
    88
    Location:
    In Reality
    Ratings:
    +501
    3 strikes means 3 strikes. I guess they thought the state wasn't serious or something. You'd think for as liberal as California is that these laws would not be so harsh, but then again the most powerful Union in California is the states correctional officers union, so the politicians are more than happy to supply enough job security and increase in funding by overcrowding the system.
     
  3. Liberty
    Offline

    Liberty Silver Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,058
    Thanks Received:
    548
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    colorado
    Ratings:
    +548
    Obamney approves of the drug war and approves of the private prison industry. More of the same 2012.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
  4. LogikAndReazon
    Offline

    LogikAndReazon Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    4,850
    Thanks Received:
    614
    Trophy Points:
    190
    Ratings:
    +1,285
    Im thinking most are Mexifornians and Hispanic gang bangers..........F--k Em............
     
  5. Meathead
    Offline

    Meathead Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2012
    Messages:
    16,034
    Thanks Received:
    2,350
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Location:
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Ratings:
    +8,897
    The "father" of the three-strikes law: Richard Allen Davis

    September 15, 1970: Arrested for participating in a motorcycle theft. A probation officer and judge accept his father's suggestion that he enlist in the Army to avoid being sent to the California Youth Authority.

    July 1971: Entered the Army. His military record reflects several infractions for AWOL, fighting, failure to report, and morphine use.

    August 1972: General discharge from the military.

    February 12, 1973: Arrested in Redwood City for public drunkenness and resisting arrest. Placed on one-year summary probation.

    April 21, 1973: Arrested in Redwood City for being a minor in possession of liquor, burglary and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Charged with trespassing, later dismissed.

    August 13, 1973: Arrested in Redwood City leaning against hedges extremely intoxicated. Released upon sobriety.

    October 24, 1973: Arrested in Redwood City on traffic warrants. Between April and October, he was implicated in more than 20 La Honda burglaries, leading a probation officer to report that residents were so angry at him, he might be in danger if he returned to La Honda. He pleaded guilty to burglary and was sentenced to six months in county jail and placed on three years' probation.

    May 13, 1974: Arrested for burglarizing South San Francisco High School. He was sent to the California Medical Facility, Vacaville, for a 90-diagnostic study. A county probation officer recommended prison, but proceedings were suspended when Davis enrolled in a Veterans Administration alcohol treatment program. He quit on the second day.

    September 16, 1974: Sentenced to one year in county jail for the school burglary. He was allowed to leave jail to attend a Native American drug and alcohol treatment program. He failed to return, leaving behind two angry fellow inmates who had given Davis money to buy drugs and bring the contraband back to jail.

    March 2, 1975: After being released, the two inmates tracked Davis down and shot him in the back. He was rearrested on a probation violation for failing to return to jail. Later, he testified against the inmates, earning him the epithet of "snitch" from fellow inmates. He was placed in protective custody.

    April 11, 1975: Arrested for parole violation.

    July 11, 1975: Arrested for auto theft and possession of marijuana. Received 10-day jail sentence.

    August 13, 1975: Probation revoked after arrest for San Francisco burglary and grand theft. He was sentenced to a term of from six months to 15 years in prison.

    August 2, 1976: Paroled from Vacaville.

    September 24, 1976: Abducted Frances Mays, a 26-year-old legal secretary, from the South Hayward BART station and attempted to sexually assault her. She escaped and hailed a passing car in which California Highway Patrol Officer Jim Wentz was riding. Wentz arrested Davis.

    December 8, 1976: Transferred to Napa State Hospital for psychiatric evaluation after he tried to hang himself in a cell at Alameda County Jail. He later admitted he faked the suicide attempt in order to be sent to a state hospital, where he could more easily escape. He was mistakenly admitted as a voluntary patient rather than a prisoner.

    December 16, 1976: Escaped from Napa State Hospital and went on a four-day crime spree in Napa. He broke into the home of Marjorie Mitchell, a nurse at the state hospital, and beat her on the head with a fire poker while she slept. He broke into a car to kidnap Hazel Frost, a bartender, as she climbed into her Cadillac outside a bar. When she saw he had bindings, she rolled out of the car, grabbed a gun from beneath the seat and fired six shots at the fleeing Davis.

    December 21, 1976: Broke into the home of Josephine Kreiger, a bank employee, in La Honda. He was arrested by a San Mateo County sheriff's deputy hiding in brush behind the home with a shotgun.

    June 1, 1977: Sentenced to a term of one to 25 years in prison for the Mays kidnapping. A sexual assault charged was dropped as part of a plea bargain. He was later sentenced to concurrent terms for the Napa crime spree and the La Honda break-in.

    1980s

    March 4, 1982: Paroled from the Deuel Vocational Institute in Tracy.
    November 30, 1984: With new girlfriend-accomplice Sue Edwards, he pistol-whipped Selina Varich, a friend of Edwards' sister, in her Redwood City apartment and forced her to withdraw $6,000 from her bank account. Davis and Edwards make a successful escape.

    March 22, 1985: Arrested in Modesto when a police officer noticed a defective taillight. He and Edwards were charged with robbing a Yogurt Cup shop and the Delta National Bank in Modesto. Authorities in Kennewick, Washington, were unaware for several years that the pair had robbed a bank, a Value Giant store and the Red Steer restaurant during the winter of 1984–1985. Davis later confessed to the crimes in an attempt to implicate Edwards, whom he believed to have welshed on a promise to help him while he was in prison.

    1990s

    June 27, 1993: Paroled from the California Men's Colony, San Luis Obispo, after serving half of a 16-year sentence for the Varich kidnapping.

    October 1, 1993: Davis kidnapped Polly Klaas during a slumber party at her Petaluma home and murdered her.

    October 19, 1993: Arrested in Ukiah for drunken driving during the search for Polly. He failed to appear in court.

    November 30, 1993: Arrested for parole violation on the Coyote Valley Indian Reservation north of Ukiah; he is identified as the prime suspect in the kidnapping.

    December 4, 1993: Davis provides investigators with information that leads them to Polly's body off U.S. Route 101 near Cloverdale.

    December 7, 1993: Charged with the kidnapping/murder of Polly.

    June 18, 1996: Convicted of kidnapping/murder of Polly.

    August 5, 1996: Superior Court jury in San Jose recommends death sentence.

    2000s

    June 1, 2009: The California Supreme Court upholds Davis' death sentence. Davis had argued that his jailhouse confession was illegal because it was given without an attorney present, but the Court said that police can ignore a suspect's rights to counsel if they believe someone's life is in jeopardy.

     
  6. Sinjorri
    Offline

    Sinjorri Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,037
    Thanks Received:
    267
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +267
    wait california got this passed, now people are complaining and now some people are looking into taking away the teeth of this law?

    okay lets start asking these questions, (i also ask this of the people who are for illegals being here and want them to get away with it)

    how many chances should a criminal get, vs a law abiding person? for the smart people this is a rigged question, but a thought that should be interjected.

    if you are going to bother passing laws, by other to appeal them and how much is this going to cost the tax payer?

    at what point do you tell the criminals, "look you did wrong, but so what, its really societies fault you are not obeying laws, that obviously you dont agree with?"
     
  7. Katzndogz
    Offline

    Katzndogz Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2011
    Messages:
    65,659
    Thanks Received:
    7,418
    Trophy Points:
    1,830
    Ratings:
    +8,337
    What's funny is that they are still dragging out the pizza thief, Jerry DeWayne Williams, who got out years ago.

    He wasn't sentenced to life because he threatened a child because he felt like having a piece of pizza and didn't want to pay for it. He was sentenced to life because he's a career criminal. Like all those non violent felons are career criminals. Just because the specific crime triggering 3-strikes wasn't a violent crime (although stealing the pizza was a violent crime), it's because they have a history of violent crime. That's why it's 3 strikes instead of one strike.

    It isn't easy to convict someone under the 3 strikes law because judges have discretion to remove a prior strike. By the time someone IS convicted under 3 strikes, they might have a dozen "strikes" that were removed.

    Jerry DeWayne Williams was released when a judge felt sorry for him. Williams' complaint at the time was that he was being FORCED to be law abiding, presumably against his will.

    That's why we need a death penalty.
     
  8. Dissent
    Offline

    Dissent BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,131
    Thanks Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    FEMA region 4
    Ratings:
    +214
    I never said they shouldn't be punished but I remember one homeless guy getting life for stealing 50 cents! That is outrageous and an abuse of the system.
     
  9. Sinjorri
    Offline

    Sinjorri Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,037
    Thanks Received:
    267
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +267
    was that his third strike or his 40th strike? what are the details?
     
  10. Dissent
    Offline

    Dissent BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,131
    Thanks Received:
    213
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    FEMA region 4
    Ratings:
    +214
    Why does it matter? Its 50 cents...
     

Share This Page