I hate the heat

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by NewGuy, Jul 22, 2004.

  1. NewGuy
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    NewGuy Guest

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    We have a wall unit (like a window unit) Air conditioner in our place. The house was built in '58 I believe and is in fantastic shape. It is 1100 square feet and the 2 ton unit is plenty for the house. -Central air actually would be MORE expensive and less efficient due to the layout of the house.

    Lately, the thing has been leaking water all over the wall and inside the house due to a problem with the built in styrofoam tray in the base of the unit. Apparently it wasn't designed to be taken apart that far.

    It is a Wards model from at least 15 years ago. We are going to sell the house soon and so far, it has been pretty warm outside. Yesterday it hit 102. It should be 105 by Saturday. My computer room in the back of the house gets MUCH hotter than everywhere else.

    Needless to say --yesterday we junked it and put in a model that is 3 years old that we had in the garage but had only been used for about 3 weeks. It is 1/4 the BTUs and a good bit smaller than the previous unit.

    Much duct tape and styrofoam cut-outs later, we had a patched hole with a new under-powered AC unit installed. Now when we sell the house, we can pull this one and give 'em $500 for a new one inside the price of the house.

    I hate the heat.

    Did I say that yet?
     
  2. HGROKIT
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    HGROKIT Active Member

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    It could get hotter if you do not deal fairly with your buyers :teeth:
     
  3. NewGuy
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    What would be fair in this case? -Replacing the unit before selling?

    I thought you could do that in the terms of the sale--lowering cost by covering the price of new unit and install.

    The old unit would be $500 for a new one. Labor would be less than a half hour anyway.

    Should it be done differently?
     
  4. HGROKIT
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    HGROKIT Active Member

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    All three of your scenarios could be considered fair AND negotiable.

    On the other hand, you may make out better by investing in the repair yourself. Why? Because that is one less issue the buyer will have to think about when considering their offer.

    Typically it goes something like this. "Let's see, if X is wrong, what about Y? I can counter with a reduction for X and maybe a little more for the unknown Y."

    The cleaner the house, the better the offer will be and with less haggling. CA has some pretty tough disclosure laws, so the more you can fix cosmetically, the better off you will be in both curb appeal and in asking price.
     
  5. NewGuy
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    Good point. I will keep this in mind so I don't end up selling for a heck of a lot less than what I originally ask. Thanks!

    That is the one thing about this place, structurally it is fantastic. -Cosmetically, not as good.

    -You know what mustard looks like when you leave it on something for a day?

    That is my exterior paint color.

    :puke3:
     
  6. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    The A/C might not be an issue. Let me ask you this...... are you in a buyer's market or a seller's?
     
  7. NewGuy
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    Currently sellers, but when we DO sell it may be different. Things are starting to even out a bit.
     
  8. NewGuy
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    Also, I should mention I don't want people poking and prodding to lower the price if I can help it anyway.
     
  9. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    Frankly, I wouldn't put a lot of money into the home. It is not going to make that much of a difference in the bottom-line of what you recieve - most likely.

    I would suggest that if you are considering selling, do it now while the market is a seller's market. Even if that means you might have to rent.

    Vegas was hot, hot, hot (real-estate as well as weather wise) but it has almost completely died off. Good buys still move fast, but the multiple offers have just STOPPED!

    Anyway, up front tell the agent to notify all potential buyers that you are going to give a $1,000 credit towards the A/C repairs. Then, if you were thinking of asking $100K for the house, list it at $101K. Most likely during the inspection stuff will be found that the new buyers will want repaired. It is up to you to accept it or not. I recently sold my home and the agreement was that we would fix anything found during the inspection - However, we were only responsible for up to $1,000 in costs. Anything above that was handled at closing. It cost us $1,500 to fix things found in the inspection so at closing, the buyers had to pay us the additional $500 we spent on repairs.

    The best times to sell homes is generally in the spring and then the fall.
     
  10. freeandfun1
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    In that case, make sure you list the home "as is" and DO NOT accept any contingency offers.
     

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