House Passes Controversial Cybersecurity Measure CISPA

Discussion in 'Congress' started by Synthaholic, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    House Passes Controversial Cybersecurity Measure CISPA

    The House on Thursday approved cybersecurity legislation that privacy groups have decried as a threat to civil liberties.

    The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, sponsored by Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Michigan) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Maryland), passed on a vote of 248 to 168.

    Its goal is a more secure internet, but privacy groups fear the measure breaches Americans’ privacy along the way. The White House had weighed in on Wednesday, threatening a veto unless there were significant changes to increase consumer privacy. The bill was amended to provide more privacy protections, but it was not immediately clear whether the Senate or the White House would give the amended bill its blessing.

    The measure, which some are calling the Son of SOPA, allows internet service providers to share information with the government, including the Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency, about cybersecurity threats it detects on the internet. An ISP is not required to shield any personally identifying data of its customers when it believes it has detected threats, which include attack signatures, malicious code, phishing sites or botnets. In short, the measure seeks to undo privacy laws that generally forbid ISPs from disclosing customer communications with anybody else unless with a court order.

    The bill immunizes ISPs from privacy lawsuits for voluntarily disclosing customer information thought to be a security threat. Internet companies are also granted anti-trust protection to immunize them against allegations of colluding on cybersecurity issues. The measure is not solely limited to cybersecurity, and includes the catchall phrase “national security” as a valid reason for turning over the data.

    CISPA also allows ISPs to bypass privacy laws and share data with fellow ISPs in a bid to promptly extinguish a cyberattack.

    Moments before the vote was taken during a daylong hearing, Rogers urged his colleagues to “stand up for America. Support this bill.” He said those who were opposing the measure — groups that include the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation — were practicing “obfuscation.”

    The bill’s supporters include Microsoft, Facebook, AT&T, Verizon, Oracle and many others.
     
  2. Synthaholic
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    Synthaholic Platinum Member

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    I'm surprised that there isn't a thread on this already.

    They are chipping away at our civil liberties. I know that Liberal groups are fighting this.

    Why aren't conservatives?
     
  3. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    I don't fight stupid stuff the government does here, I fight it where it makes a difference. I use this place to mock the government, and all the idiots who support it.
     
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  4. Katzndogz
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    Katzndogz Diamond Member

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    This involves something we have never had to deal with before. Both Iran and China have major cyber crime installations capable of interfering with each and every computer in the country.

    The kind of criminal activity is not something we have seen before, experienced before and has been historically impossible. Technically these major cyber installations can take away your civil liberties, privacy and your finances at whim. What it comes down to is whether you trust the Chinese and Iranians to respect your civil liberties more than you trust the US government to respect your civil liberties.
     
  5. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    Ohhh, we are scared, so we have to let the government do whatever it wants in order to not be scared, but we are always scared, even when the government does everything.
     
  6. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Granny says dey better not be hackin' into her webcam when she takin' a shower...
    :eek:
    Web sites fall victim to cyberspies
    Thu, May 17, 2012 - ’DRIVE-BY ATTACKS’: Visitors to legitimate Web sites of human rights organizations or government agencies might find that they have been targeted by malware
     
  7. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Granny gonna throw a towel over her webcam when she inna bathtub...
    :eusa_shifty:
    Mueller: ‘Substantial’ Risk of Cyber Attack in Next 10 Years
    May 17, 2012 – FBI Director Robert Mueller told a Senate committee on Wednesday that there is a “substantial” risk that the nation will face a cyber attack in the next decade.
     
  8. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Major ongoing cyber-espionage effort against the US...
    :eek:
    US is target of massive cyberespionage: report
    Tue, Feb 12, 2013 - The US intelligence community has concluded that the US is the target of a massive cyberespionage campaign that is threatening its competitiveness, the Washington Post reported late on Sunday.
     
  9. TruthSeeker56
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    TruthSeeker56 Silver Member

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    The problem with these types of "national security" umbrella laws is WHO determines what is a national security concern?

    Facebook? Verizon? AT&T? Microsoft?

    The thought of some $10.00 an hour flunky internet "monitor" deciding if I am a "threat" to national security is both ludicrous and a complete infringement of many basic rights that are guaranteed by our Constitution.

    Big Brother putting us under a microscope even MORE, is not acceptable.
     
  10. Truthmatters
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    Truthmatters BANNED

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    yeah doesnt sound real good for civil liberties
     

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