Homeschooling? Thinking of? Indispensable

Discussion in 'Education' started by Annie, Jan 15, 2006.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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  2. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    I fully endorse homeschooling as a big rusty wrench flung into the gear-heart of the NWO.

    Now how about we start up HOME COLLEGING? It would be cheaper and you could nix the left-wing propaganda, which is to say, 90 percent of the current material.

    I guess the problem would be that nobody over 18 wants to live at home.

    OK, let me work on this idea.
     
  3. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    I think homeschooling is a wonderful thing. To those opposed to it because it takes children out of a "diverse environment," I say :tng: !

    In Ohio law, the parent has the right to decide on an appropriate education for his/her children. I don't think the government has any business deciding what morals & values your children need to embrace. That is a parent's right.
     
  4. liberalogic
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    liberalogic Member

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    It's funny that when it comes to parents and children, then the government has no right to impose moral values. But when the hot social issues of today arise, then the government has the right to be "moral." That seems to be a bit contradictory.

    Whatever the case, though, you have the right to decide whether you should homeschool or send your child to "traditional school." While I have strong opinions about the lack of education going on in schools today, I still feel that the child needs not just the academic training, but social training. Intelligence is not the only ingredient to success. How do you expect your kids to interact in business, sales, or any other type of job if they have little exposure, on their own, to peers?
     
  5. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    Much homeschooling happens in co-ops, where there is social interaction with peers, though on a smaller scale.
     
  6. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    Exactly. While some kids are sequestered from society, many homeschoolers take advantage of the lack of time constraints to actually explore the world around them in a very hands-on way. They are free to visit many environments, many different people groups. The home-schoolers group in my area (Home School Cool Kids) is actually as big a group of peers as you would find in a parochial classroom. They volunteer at a local nursing home, as well as visit a special education center. This group of kids is made up of gifted children to very slow-learners, so there is a range of intellectual levels. They have visited museums as well as toured local businesses. I think it is a common misconception that homeschooled kids aren't as well socialized as regular school kids. Some studies have shown them to be better socialized in terms of manners.

    And Shyers, from the secular perspective of his research, looked at how homeschooled children treat other children. Shyers found no significant difference between his two groups in scores on the Children's Assertive Behavior Scale. But direct observation by trained observers, using a "blind" procedure, found that home-schooled children had significantly fewer problem behaviors, as measured by the Child Observation Checklist's Direct Observation Form, than traditionally schooled children when playing in mixed groups of children from both kinds of schooling backgrounds. This observational study was reported in some detail in the 1992 Associated Press article. Shyers concluded that the hypothesis that contact with adults, rather than contact with other children, is most important in developing social skills in children is supported by these data.

    The same year that Shyers completed his doctoral degree thesis research on homeschooling socialization, Thomas Smedley completed master's degree research at Radford University in Virginia, with a similar experimental design. Smedley compared twenty home-schooled children to thirteen public school children, matching the children as best he could by relevant demographic characteristics. His study used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, which evaluate communication skills, socialization, and daily living skills. Smedley found that the home-schooled children were more mature according to the scoring rubrics of the Vineland scales, scoring in the 84th percentile, while the public school children scored in the 27th percentile. Thus the Shyers finding supports a nearly simultaneous finding by a different researcher, who used a different social science evaluation procedure on a different sample population. Such a replicated finding is unusual in social science.


    http://learninfreedom.org/socialization.html
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I wonder of you age? Schools have much to be said for them in 'toughening up' kids, little to do with actual socialization. That comes from home. If you check out homeschooling communities, boards, and chats, not to mention actual organizations, you will find lots of opportunities to socialize.
     
  8. Abbey Normal
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    Abbey Normal Senior Member

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    I would tend to agree. Besides a 1/2 hour lunch, my daughter, who is in public high school, tells me that she has almost zero time to socialize. They are intentionally rushed from class to class to avoid problems in the halls and stairways, It's in the extra-curricular activities where she gets to know people.
     
  9. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    If the teacher is "in control" very little socialization in class, other than perhaps 'group dynamics'. Schools for the most part, from upper elementary on keep lunch/recess at the minimum, as this is where most conflicts occur.
     
  10. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    You also have to understand that most homeschoolers go and interact with adults, rather than children. This interaction teaches the kids to talk to people in polite, formal tones so they don't show up to their first job interview with their pants buckled around their knees and calling the boss-to-be "homey."
     

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