Homemade Jams & Jellies

Discussion in 'Food & Wine' started by JustAnotherNut, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    It's June and that is Strawberry season around here. We love homemade preserves cause well the alternative is store bought & YUCK. I haven't bought any in about 30 years.

    I ended up with 3 pints of jelly, 6 pints of jam, 3 pints of jamelly (not enough of either, but just enough of both) plus 3 trays in the dehydrator of slices. Will probably get more before the season is over.

    Anyone else make their own jams &/or jellies?

    If you do and want to get the most from your fruit I'd suggest a simple trick...…..after crushing the berries (or fruit), drain off the juices either thru a colander or cheesecloth into a container...….add water if needed to make a batch of jelly. Then use the fruit to make jam.

    I've always used Sure-Jell or MVP(?) brand powdered pectin in the boxes and follow the directions for each recipe. When I ended up with leftover juice & leftover berries, but not enough of each for a full recipe....I ran it all in a blender to puree and topped it off with water to get a full measurement and used the jelly recipe to get the jamelly.

    It's gonna be gooooooood
     
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  2. Disir
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    Disir Gold Member

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    Nope. I'm in awe.
     
  3. toobfreak
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    toobfreak Gold Member

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    FWIW, I hope you are growing your own. Store bought strawberries have been found to have the highest concentrations of pesticides in them that washing does not remove.

    Dirty Dozen 2019: The Foods With the Most Pesticides | Eat This Not That
     
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  4. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    If you want to try it...….get ya some jars, berries, sugar & a box of pectin. Just follow the instructions that come in the box of pectin. Really easy.



    Except I will say the instructions say to process the filled jars in a water bath canner. And if you choose, you can do it that way. I just feel like cooking the jam twice is overkill. So once I fill the jars, wipe the rims clean, I put on a hot flat lid, tighten down the screwband……...then turn it upside down on a towel on the counter for about 5 minutes, then turn it right side up. The lids will seal in a few minutes or so as the jars cool and you should hear a 'ping' or 'pop' when it does. This is called 'open kettle' canning and has been done for many years......until the FDA or USDA said it was no longer safe to do so.

    Well, if your hands, tools & utensils are clean, your food is properly handled and you don't let the dog lick the spoon...….it should still be safe.


    There is also directions for no cook freezer jam that is even easier to do and it also tastes even better because it's not been cooked at all, more like eating fresh picked sweet berries.....I just don't have the freezer space.
     
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  5. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    I don't use store bought berries just because they don't have any flavor. I do have strawberries in my garden..but this year isn't producing. These berries came from a small farm down the road that I know doesn't use pesticides. Although in the past I have gotten my berries from a local U-pick that probably does used pesticides
     
  6. Compost
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    My boysenberry patch gets bigger and produces more each year. I've wanted to make jam but have been scared off by the canning process - all that boiling- all those germs to kill... You have helped me see that I'm wigging out over nothing. Unless the birds really gang up on my boysenberry patch, I'm going to make jam 'round about August.

    Thanks Nut!
     
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  7. Care4all
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    I only make Apple sauce with the wild apples.... My green apple trees used to make the best sauce, but I've lost both of the green apple trees and am now using the red Apple ones, the wild yellow apple are too sweet to use..

    Never made jam....jelly.

    We have wild raspberries and wild elderberry that I'd like to try.
     
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  8. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    Different recipes call for different amounts but process is the same. These instructions are straight from the pectin packet.....just so you both can see how easy it is and if you want to venture into jam making. I will say the instructions don't include elderberries, or wild berries at all...…..but you can probably find a good recipe online for most anything.


    For cooked Boysenberry and Red Raspberry jam, you'll need 5 Cups crushed berries, 7 Cups Sugar & 1 box pectin......optional 1/2 tsp butter to prevent foaming. Canning jars with 2 piece lids, clean & sterilized.

    1. Crush berries with a potato masher or other device (just don't use a blender if you want pieces of fruit). At this point you can strain off the juices if you also want to make jelly from the same berries. (jelly recipe has different amounts of juice & sugar)

    2. Have the sugar measured out in a separate bowl or container.

    3. Bring berries (or juice for jelly) and pectin to a full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly to prevent sticking, that can't be stirred down. Adding butter before boiling is optional.

    4. Add pre-measured sugar, continuing to stir and return to a full rolling boil. Boil for exactly 1 minute while stirring constantly. Remove from heat.

    5. Fill jars with hot mixture to within 1/4 inch of the top of jar, wipe jar rims with clean damp cloth, put on flat lids, & screw down band rings tight.

    Either put jars upside down on a towel on a flat counter surface for 5 minutes then turn right side up...…..or put them in a water bath canner with enough boiling water to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. When all jars are filled and in the canner, put on the canner lid & bring water back to a boil. Process jellies 5 minutes or jams 10 minutes. Turn off the heat & using canning tongs, take jars out of the canner & set on a towel on a flat surface or counter. Let them cool completely several hours or overnight. Store in a cool dark place.


    For Cooked Boysenberry Jelly you'll need......3 3/4 Cups juice (can add water to make measurement), 4 1/2 Cups sugar, 1 box pectin & 1/2 tsp butter optional. Process as for jam.

    For Cooked Red Raspberry jelly you'll need 4 Cups juice, 5 1/2 Cups sugar, 1 box pectin & 1/2 tsp butter optional. Process as for jam.



    For freezer jam, have freezer safe containers with tight fitting lids, cleaned & sterilized. I could only find Red Raspberry, but not Boysenberry but probably could be done just like Blackberry......which is still the same as the raspberry recipe.

    You will need 3 cups berries and 5 1/4 cups sugar. Add sugar to berries and let stand 10 minutes, stir occasionally. In a small saucepan, stir 1 pkg pectin and 3/4 cup water. Bring to a boil on high heat, stirring constantly. Boil 1 minute. Remove from heat. Add pectin mixture to berry mixture and stir 3 minutes or until sugar is completely dissolved and no longer grainy. Fill all containers immediately, leaving 1/2 inch space at tops for expansion during freezing, cover with lids. Let stand at room temperature 24 hours or until set. Refrigerate up to 3 weeks or freeze up to 1 year.




    Package instructions didn't include elderberry but I did find a recipe here.... Elderberry Jelly Recipe | SimplyRecipes.com


    Instructions did include apple jelly and if you do applesauce, you could just strain off the juice to use for jelly.
     
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  9. HenryBHough
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    HenryBHough Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Haven't made any fireweed jelly in about 10 years. Found it much easier and more fun to make fireweed wine.
     
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