Dig diamonds instead..

Discussion in 'Stock Market' started by Martin Timothy, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. Martin Timothy
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    Martin Timothy BANNED

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    The diamond pipes or clusters of pipes at diamond bearing locations attest to this, as do alluvial diamonds in stream sediments associated with impact fields, ie basins which formed during an ancient cometary impact.

    The Tweed Valley in far Eastern Australia is one such, the diamonds that turn up there the highest quality in Australia, satellite photography has identified large impact basins in Western Australia, including a system of interlocking impact formations, visible on Google Earth, and on nightly TV Weather Maps of Australia’s mainland.

    Picture shots of drops falling into milk for instance, a crown like structure will appear, the points on the crown corresponds to the vents formed during impact that carries impacted material, and pieces of the comet, diamonds, to the surface.

    Typically a diamondiferous crater will have a central peak associated with the impact, see Mount Warning in the Tweed Valley, however the diamondiferous pipes are at the boundaries of the crater.

    Obtain a GPS and go to the locations you have pinpointed from satellite photos, use an ultra violet light source to find which pebbles and pieces of gravel fluoresce in the UV, then find which stones will leave a scratch mark on glass.

    The ones that do are the diamonds, I have used this tequnique to locate some great stones from a hitherto unmapped source on Kangaroo Island, off the coast of South Australia.

    Word is that at the diamond mines in South Africa the diamonds are getting bigger the deeper the miners dig.. tales of boulder sized objects arise, where miners gather to drink and talk, when they get to the nucleus of the comet maybe thousand ton diamonds will be found.
     
  2. Jos
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    Jos BANNED

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    When you think about it, they are just stones, there value is false other than as a cutting medium, there not even rare, the gem market is controlled by a few big companies who set the price by holding most stones back I'd take a tourmaline over a diamond anyday
     
  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I think we should be encouraging Martin to go hunt more diamonds. ;)
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    I think he is better at drinking with the miners.

    Diamonds are found in kimberlites and lamproites. Neither of which are caused by cometary strikes.

    There are also diamonds resulting from subduction;


    Subduction model for the origin of some diamonds in the Phanerozoic of eastern New South Wales - Australian Journal of Earth Sciences: An International Geoscience Journal of the Geological Society of Australia

    Eastern New South Wales has produced over 500 000 carats of diamonds, mostly from the Copeton-Bingara area in the north. A local derivation is indicated by their distinct tribal character and lack of surface damage, while carbon isotopic values and composition of mineral inclusions are unlike those in diamonds from conventional diamond-producing areas, for example Yakutia (Siberia), Kapvaal (South Africa), or Argyle (Western Australia). The eastern New South Wales tectonic setting is also unlike that for 'conventional' diamonds, involving a Phanerozoic sequence of accreted subduction terranes, with relatively thin hot crust. A subduction diamond model is developed to explain the origin and geology of eastern New South Wales diamonds. This model involves prolonged subduction of mature oceanic crust, resulting in the development of a low-temperature metamorphic window into the diamond stability field within the downgoing slab at half the depth required by conventional models. The diamonds are preserved at depth by termination of subduction, and brought to the surface by obduction or by entrainment in suitable magmas. The type of diamond formed depends on the original source rock (diamond affinity is shown in brackets): carbonaceous-rich and carbonaceous-poor trench sediments (CaFeMgMn-silicate, eclogitic), graphite-poor basalt and gabbro (eclogitic) and lherzolite (peridotitic). The model predicts that the New South Wales diamonds are young (Phanerozoic) and that their features, age, associated minerals and geographic distribution relate to New South Wales tectonic provinces. The subduction diamond model extends the range of indicator minerals to include macro-diamond, corundum, Na-garnet, with a new series of carrier magmas (basanite, nephelinite, leucitite). Unsuccessful previous exploration in New South Wales, based on conventional models, has produced some positive results when reinterpreted in terms of the subduction diamond model. A re-evaluation of diamond potential of eastern New South Wales is warranted.

    Argyle diamond mine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The Argyle Diamond Mine is a diamond mine located in the East Kimberley region in the remote north of Western Australia. Argyle is the largest diamond producer in the world by volume, although due to the low proportion of gem-quality diamonds, is not the leader by value. It is the only known significant source of pink diamonds, producing over 90% of the world's supply. It additionally provides a large proportion of other naturally coloured diamonds, including champagne, cognac and rare blue diamonds. Argyle is currently transitioning from an open pit mine to an underground mine.

    The Argyle diamond mine is also notable for being the first successful commercial diamond mine exploiting a volcanic pipe of lamproite, rather than the more usual kimberlite pipe; much earlier attempts to mine diamonds from a lamproite pipe in Arkansas, USA were commercially unsuccessful. The Argyle mine is owned by the Rio Tinto Group, a diversified mining company which also owns the Diavik Diamond Mine in Canada and the Murowa Diamond Mine in Zimbabwe.

    The Lamproite pipe near Murfreesboro, Arkansas, is owned by the government and is open to the public, where you can look for diamonds for a small fee, and keep what you find. Many other minerals of interest there, also.
     
  5. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    I find it hard to believe that a fairly short lived incident like a meteor or comet strike could create diamonds. Other than very tiny ones, I don't see the time course being long enough to create diamonds of any appreciable size.
     

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