Capital punishment at crossroads in US

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by Gunny, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Just a thought, but not committing a capital crime might go a long way in abolishing capital punishment.

    *will give appropriate pennance for using logic later*
     
  2. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    So take the guy out and hang him. No lethal injection involved. Problem solved.

    Wonder if this idiot considered it cruel and unusual to shoot his woman's husband in his own bed?
     
  3. jillian
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    jillian Princess Supporting Member

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    You notice there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime scene. Personally, I don't think the state should have gotten a third time to get him convicted.
     
  4. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Kind a different subtopic ... the application of capital punishment in the US as opposed to whether or not lethal injection is "cruel and unusual punishment."

    IMO, no one should be sentenced to die without overwhelming evidence that leaves absolutely NO doubt as to guilt.

    We already discussed the so-called "protection" against double-jeopardy.
     
  5. jillian
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    jillian Princess Supporting Member

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    I agree that no one should die without overwhelming evidence that leaves no doubt as to guilt. I also think we need to address unequal application.

    The double jeopardy issue vis a vis state and federal government is different since both entities are considered sovereign in their own right and neither can tell the other what to do in that regard. However, I think there's something inherantly wrong with the state having three trials against the same person on the same charges.
     
  6. mattskramer
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    mattskramer Senior Member

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    If we are to have capital punishment as part of our justice system, I do not see lethal injection as being “cruel and unusual”. The issue over whether or not we should practice capital punishment is a different issue.
     
  7. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    I'm curious as to the justification for getting three shots at him. The article doesn't go into detail.
     
  8. jillian
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    jillian Princess Supporting Member

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    I'm curious about that, too.

    But this is a little something I found on the case. I'm wondering why the Innocence Project hasn't latched on to this.
     
  9. Diuretic
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    Diuretic Permanently confused

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    I heard about this case on the BBC World Service, it was an interesting programme. Apparently Arthur is maintaining his innocence (I know, prisons are full of innocent people, I've put a few innocent people in there myself <--- please note, sarcasm for effect) and is claiming that DNA evidence will clear him. Strangely enough the state of Alabama is seemingly reluctant to allow the use of DNA evidence. Could it be that the state of Alabama is keen to bury a mistake? Sorry, but the radio story (which may be available as a download from the BBC) had a lot of detail about alleged prosecutorial incompetence and foot-dragging by the justice system to make me highly suspicious of them.

    On 'cruel and unusual punishment'. I know the legal approach (no unnecessary cruelty I would think) but it strikes me as a bit wry when the state discusses which method of execution isn't 'cruel and unusual'.

    On doubt. There is never certainty in a criminal trial.
     
  10. CorpMediaSux
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    Our country is so jacked up that the debate isn't even what it should be. Those who want capital punishment should have to defend why it's OK for the state to kill one of its own citizens, regardless of what they have done. What's the logic behind it? Does society benefit in some way? Capital cases are extremely expensive, often moreso than housing and feeding an individual. I mean this is getting at fundamental questions of what our criminal justice system is about. Is it just about punishment for revenge sake. Or does it have some other purpose?
     

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