Can't believe it's from the NYTimes

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Moi, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. Moi
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    Moi Active Member

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    An article defending the economy and employment increases!

    February 22, 2004
    ESSAY
    A Prettier Jobs Picture?
    By VIRGINIA POSTREL

    Productivity has risen rapidly over the past year, to the astonishment and delight of most economists. But a lot of people are still worried. What if increased productivity means that jobs disappear? Could the economy get too efficient? All over the world, even in China, factories are producing more stuff with fewer workers. On the Internet, visionaries fret over the rise of robots, while programmers denounce American companies for ''outsourcing'' their once-secure jobs to Indian engineers. Is this the recession -- or the recovery -- that does away with American jobs for good?

    Many of the jobs that disappeared in the recent recession have indeed vanished forever, according to a recent study by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Those workers will not be recalled as the economy improves. New jobs will have to be genuinely new, created in new or expanding enterprises.

    But where will they come from? In a quickly evolving economy, in which increased productivity constantly makes some jobs redundant, we notice the job losses. It is much harder to spot where new jobs are emerging. Our mental categories tend to be behind the times. When we think of jobs, we see factories, secretarial pools, police officers, lawyers. We forget all about jobs we see every day.

    The official job counters at the Bureau of Labor Statistics don't do much to overcome our blind spots. The bureau is good at counting people who work for large organizations in well-defined, long-established occupations. It is much less adept at counting employees in small businesses, simply because there are too many small enterprises to representatively sample them. The bureau's occupational survey, which might suggest which jobs are growing, doesn't count self-employed people or partners in unincorporated businesses at all. And many of today's growing industries, the ones adding jobs even amid the recession, are comprised largely of small companies and self-employed individuals. That is particularly true for aesthetic crafts, from graphic designers and cosmetic dentists to gardeners. These specialists' skills are in ever greater demand, yet they tend to work for themselves or in partnerships.

    To read article: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/22/magazine/22ESSAY.html?pagewanted=print&position=
     
  2. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    You mean, you're surprised the Times ran a libertarian? Ah, big deal. They just ran Noam Chomsky, too. Anybody who challenges the system a little bit , but not too much, can appear in the New York Times. See if they run something written by Jared Taylor or Kevin MacDonald!
     

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