California's Devastating Fires Are Man-Caused -- But Not In The Way They Tell Us

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Sunsettommy, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. Sunsettommy
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    Sunsettommy VIP Member Supporting Member

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    Yet another article showing that these big fires are mostly the fault of bad forestry management by the state and federal governments. Environmentalists and stupid regulations took away methods to maintain the underbrush and crowded trees.

    Forbes

    California's Devastating Fires Are Man-Caused -- But Not In The Way They Tell Us

    Jul 30, 2018

    Chuck Devore

    Excerpt:

    "California is once again on fire. Northern California’s Carr Fire has killed six people, two of them firefighters, and continues to burn out of control, claiming more than 700 homes and about 100,000 acres.

    As a citizen-soldier in the California Army National Guard for two decades, I often heard the gallows humor quip that California’s four seasons were: flood, fire, earthquake and riot.

    But, what was once an expected part of living in the Golden State is now blamed on larger forces. A crisis, we are told, should never go to waste."

    LINK
     
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  2. Dogmaphobe
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    I fought fires near Redding back in 1971, and I remember a week when the temps exceeded 110 every day. It was pretty awful trying to control fires raging through all that manzanita and digger pine.

    As far as the fires. today, I don't blame global warming since it was as hot or hotter then. I don't blame environmental practices, either. since the place has always been a tinder box..

    I just chalk it up to shit happens, myself.
     
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  3. Tipsycatlover
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    Tipsycatlover Gold Member

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    The asinine regulations may have made the fires worse. But these are arson.
     
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  4. westwall
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    westwall Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    No, there has been decades of forest mismanagement. The policy back then was to stop every fire, the problem being the fires clear out the low under brush. Now, after decades of building up, the fires crown and incinerate everything in their path. That's not what they do when they are allowed to naturally burn out the crud.
     
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  5. Dogmaphobe
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    I wouldn't call the area affected forest, per se, though. It's all digger pine and manzanita until the elevation rises a bit and transitions into ponderosa pine and then sugar pine and silver fir further up.

    In any case, I don't blame. Not fighting the fires really wasn't an option back then any more than it is now.
     
  6. westwall
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    westwall Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Which is true for the most part, but the manzanita is 30 feet tall now! I was a Hot Shot for two years back in the 1960's and the fuel load is orders of magnitude greater than it was back then.


    You are correct about the policy back then, we simply didn't understand the impact we were setting up for the future. Now, when it is safe to do so the fires are allowed to burn. As they should be.
     
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  7. Dogmaphobe
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    I never saw manzanita so big back then. Most of it around Whiskytown was maybe 4-8 feet that I remember.

    It's been decades since I was there, though.
     
  8. westwall
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    westwall Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Here's what it looks like now.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. eagle1462010
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    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure...............

    Fires will continue to happen there..........whether started by man or nature..............They must do fire breaks and controlled burns to protect areas.
     
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  10. chesswarsnow
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    chesswarsnow "SASQUATCH IS WATCHING"

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    Sorry bout that,

    1. How many back fires are being used?
    2. That's a darling question.
    3. Why don't home owners have fire fighting equipment?
    Regards,
    SirJamesofTexas
     
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