CDZ Big government in Texas makes America less competitive

Discussion in 'Clean Debate Zone' started by Toronado3800, Aug 27, 2018.

  1. Toronado3800
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    Toronado3800 Gold Member

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    Again, don't misunderstand what I am saying. Something is going to happen for the first time someplace. Floods aren't meteorite strikes though, they are predictable and will happen again.

    Maybe you are an expert on Houston and it has never flooded before. I'll make them a deal, they get aid for flooding this time because no one remembers any of them locations ever flooding before. Next time they have to pay cash for every FEMA blanked, MRE and helicopter rescue before they get plucked off a roof.

    Maybe I'm older, maybe I've just lived through more than my share of once in a lifetime how could we see this coming flooding events.

    2013
    This Houston street's almost completely underwater: The monster Halloween storm fallout continues

    2012
    "100-year rainfall event" drenches Houston area - CBS News

    2015
    https://www.bizjournals.com/houston...-in-review-floods-hammer-houston-in-2015.html

    Look, at the Washington Post, this guy noticed it, 3rd 500 year flood in 5 years
    Analysis | Houston is experiencing its third ‘500-year’ flood in 3 years. How is that possible?

    Mark me cynical. Around here it seems we bail out the same flood victim neighborhoods with the same disaster aid sucking mayors and the same failed infrastructure every 3 years.

    Remember, Fox and CNN make more money the more special they can make things seem because more people will watch.
     
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  2. HereWeGoAgain
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    HereWeGoAgain Diamond Member

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    There's no doubt Houston has a flooding problem but they were doing more about it even before Harvey.
    You are now required to have a retention pond if you're going to build a structor over a certain square foot.
    Hell,they were thinking about it in 1948 when the dams were built.
    Just like California was implementing building codes for earthquakes and Florida did the same for hurricanes.
    Shit happens no matter where you live.
     
  3. Toronado3800
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    Toronado3800 Gold Member

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    Flooding is soo predictable though. Like you said, they've been spending big bucks since 1948 to deal with it. Why not just build up a hill where it would be cheaper?
     
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  4. HereWeGoAgain
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    HereWeGoAgain Diamond Member

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    What do you think the dams are?
    Which they've been upgrading.
    [​IMG]
    These reservoirs dont have water in them in normal times and only fill up under unusually heavy rains.
    They encompass 26,000 acres or 43 square miles.
     
  5. Toronado3800
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    Toronado3800 Gold Member

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    Wow, how much money has been invested in them dams that cover 43 square miles?
     
  6. HereWeGoAgain
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    HereWeGoAgain Diamond Member

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    The dams dont cover 43 square miles,they provide 43 square miles of water retainment.
    Houston is the fourth largest city in America and has the largest foreign port in the U.S.
    You think we should abandon that port?
     
  7. Toronado3800
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    Toronado3800 Gold Member

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    Nope I don't think we should abandon the port. Like Donald would say, if it makes us money keep doing it.

    I think them dams are quite the undertaking and the land they protect is more costly to develop than land that just happens to be up the hill. Not to mention when one fails its going to create tragic instances where children die because of the ignorance or mistakes of their parents.

    Me, I'd just want to recollect on their parent's rescue.

    In St Louis should we abandon the river front? No.

    People just don't need to live within walking distance or a horse ride of the river front though. I suspect Houston is largely the same. Also we've shown how building levees raises the rivers elsewhere and speeds up flooding thus pushing the cost of our poor development choices onto others.

    Buy outs not 1,000 years protection is my motto. Let's spur the home construction industry for everyone who wants to work.
     
  8. HereWeGoAgain
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    HereWeGoAgain Diamond Member

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    You dont seem to understand the manner in which Houston floods.
    There's no rushing waters it's a slow climb.
    And again there are no rivers or lakes near Houston.
    We have Buffalo bayou and thats it.
     
  9. Toronado3800
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    So there is no point in spending that money retaining them 43 square miles of water because its slow and peaceable?
     
  10. oldsoul
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    oldsoul Gold Member

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    The manner in which Houston floods is irrelevant to the point here. Let's remove all of the specifics and see if we can come to an understanding here.

    There is a fictional city (we'll call it "Megatown" for ease of reference) you don't live in, and have no connection to, because it's fictional. This city is in an area that, history has shown, is prone to a certain type of disaster. The current reaction to said disaster is to rebuild, with Federal tax dollars in part. What the OP is suggesting is, why don't we just move Megatown to a different site, just a few miles away, where the area is less prone to disasters? Of course it's not quite that easy, because, in most cases, that new site would be owned by someone(s). Let's just say, for argument's sake, that in the case of Megatown, there is a piece of federal land 20 miles away, that is roughly the same size, has usable topography, and has little chance of experiencing a natural disaster. Would you be in favor of looking into the idea of moving the city instead of rebuilding?
     

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