Big Bellies Tied to Heart Disease

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by Adam's Apple, Jan 1, 2007.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Big Bellies Tied to Heart Disease

    The more your belly sticks out, the greater your risk of developing heart disease, a new study shows.

    "The message is really obesity in the abdomen matters even more than obesity overall," Dr. Carlos Iribarren of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California in Oakland, the study's lead author, told Reuters Health.

    Body mass index (BMI), a gauge of weight in relation to height, is a fairly crude way to judge a person's heart disease risk based on obesity, he noted. For example, muscular people may have a high BMI and be perfectly healthy.

    In the current study, Iribarren and his team looked at 101,765 men and women who underwent checkups between 1965 and 1970, which included SAD measurements, and were then followed for about 12 years.

    Men with the largest SAD were 42 percent more likely to develop heart disease during follow-up compared to those with the smallest SAD, while a large SAD increased heart disease risk by 44 percent for women, Iribarren and his team found.

    Within BMI categories, the researchers found, heart disease risk rose with SAD; even among men of normal weight, heart disease risk was higher for those with bigger bellies.

    The relationship between SAD and heart disease risk was strongest among the youngest men and women, which is not surprising, Iribarren said, given that people who develop central obesity younger in life would likely have more serious problems.

    "I think it has important implications for prevention," he said. " Don't let this happen to you when you're young; that's kind of the message."

    SOURCE: American Journal of Epidemiology, December 15, 2006.
    © Reuters 2006.
     
  2. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Storing up heart problems?...
    :confused:
    Unhappy childhood linked to heart risk in later life
    1 February 2013 - Emotional behaviour in childhood may be linked with heart disease in middle age, especially in women, research suggests.
     
  3. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Mummies had clogged arteries...
    :eusa_eh:
    Study: Even ancient mummies had clogged arteries
    Mar 10,`13 -- Even without modern-day temptations like fast food or cigarettes, people had clogged arteries some 4,000 years ago, according to the biggest-ever study of mummies searching for the condition.
    See also:

    Studies tie stress from storms, war to heart risks
    Mar 10,`13 -- Stress does bad things to the heart. New studies have found higher rates of cardiac problems in veterans with PTSD, New Orleans residents six years after Hurricane Katrina and Greeks struggling through that country's financial turmoil.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2013
  4. LoudMcCloud
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    LoudMcCloud Member

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    Man. These studies are pointing out the obvious. If someone is over weight, they are less healthy. That's common sense. lol. They spent all that time with a study and they just could have asked me. lol.
     
  5. Kooshdakhaa
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    Kooshdakhaa Gold Member

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    The correlation between big bellies and heart disease is nothing new. I've been reading about this for years, that being overweight is a factor, but WHERE you carry your weight is a big factor as well.

    Oh...I just realized the study posted here is from 2006! : ) I rest my case. : )
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  6. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Granny says, "Dat's right - eat yer breakfast...
    :cool:
    Skipping breakfast may increase heart attack risk
    22 July — Another reason to eat breakfast: Skipping it may increase your chances of a heart attack.
     
  7. whitehall
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    whitehall Gold Member

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    Are big bellies directly related to heart attacks or do most people who die of heart attacks have big bellies? Government grants will get you any statistic that you are willing to pay for. I bet studies would find that people who die of heart attacks ate carrots.
     
  8. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    There is substantial evidence to indicate that belly fat is much worse than say ass fat. Two people, same sex, same height, same weight, but one has most of his excess fat in his ass and the other has most of his excess fat in his belly, it has been shown that the one with most of the excess fat in the belly is at much greater risk of heart disease than the guy with the ass fat.

    In the end though, if you're carrying around extra body fat, it's not a good thing. It makes our heart work that much harder and usually is a sign of clogged arteries. While we can't force people to live healthy lives, we should do everything we can to encourage them to do so.
     

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