Battle Over Remedial Classes for English and Math

Discussion in 'Education' started by Mad Scientist, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. Mad Scientist
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    Mad Scientist Deplorable Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    College Trustee Steven Ngo want's to change the college remedial class "consequence" from 2.5 years to 1.5 years. I hadn't heard it described that way before, "consequence".

    Anyway the heart of the matter is about whether students should be given more or less time to learn, or remediate, their Math and English skills to a college level.

    The Bay Citizen - At City College, a Battle Over Remedial Classes for English and Math - NYTimes.com

    2.5 years of remedial anything means one of two things:
    1.Your H.S. failed you.
    2.You're not cut out for college.

    Both of my sons went from Americans schools straight to Japanese schools and did just fine. The got the Japanese language emmersion and, this is the key, were not allowed to be tested in English, only Japanese.

    Kids are smarter and more capable than we give them credit for. They can handle the stress and work load just fine. Let's stop babying them.
     
  2. syrenn
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    syrenn BANNED

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    If you need remedial ANYTHING you shouldn't be in college!
     
  3. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I am not opposed to remedial classes for college students who need additional background to qualify for upper level classes in their discipline. Son Foxfyre took awhile but finally settled on engineering as his chosen discipline, but didn't take some of the requisite advanced math in highschool. So it required some remedial courses to get him up to speed in the math. (He took Calculus 1 three times before finally passing it.) But then he excelled in his math courses and is now a successful and prosperous engineer.

    So I'm all for students having the option to choose whatever coursework they need to reach for their dream and as long as they're willing to pay for it, and they aren't depriving any other student of a spot in class, I don't have a problem with them taking as long as it takes.

    I also don't have a problem with putting a time limit on subsidized student aid, etc. when a student just isn't cutting it or when the classroom space is needed for more motivated or capable students.
     
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  4. Mad Scientist
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    Mad Scientist Deplorable Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Not passing Calculus I isn't even close to not passing basic Math. I took Calculus I and II by the way.

    The point was that some students will never "get it" so why waste time and funds in that effort?
     
  5. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Because all students don't have equal aptitude. For one of my kids, math was effortless, unbelievably easy. For the other not so much. But the kid that had to work harder at it did eventually get it. And once he learned it, he really had it.

    Plus we have public schools now in which social promotions are the norm. No matter how much they goof off or blow off the subject matter, kids are passed whether or not they know anything. So at some point the light bulb comes on and the kid decides to clean up his act and make something of himself. It will be difficult because he has none of the requisite background for the coursework. And he struggles mightily getting that basic math so he can move on. But as long as he is willing to struggle to get it, are you going to tell him no? You don't have to pay the price for him or disadvantage another student for him. But as long as he is willing to try, I say let him.

    We have generations of welfare kids who have been told all their lives that there isn't any use trying because they'll just be knocked down.

    I'm not willing to say that to any kid.

    If he gives up that is one thing. But I'm not going to give up on him.
     
  6. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    Seems like the same problem, over and over again. Lower the standards or lose the minorities.

    All you have to do is pass the entrance exam. If you can't then you should find a different life path.
     
  7. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    So...Is this supposed to be more evidence of the "success" of gubmint schools? :lol:
     
  8. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I don't disagree with this. But I am unwilling to say that those who can't pass it on the first or second attempt should be denied a chance to keep trying.'

    I am 100% opposed to social promotions or letting kids slip through the system believing they're doing enough when they aren't. I am 100% FOR demanding results and excellence to earn grades and for requiring students to demonstrate that they did do the work and they legitimately earned their grades.

    But for the goof offs who choose to turn it around and go for the brass ring after all, I'm not about to say they shouldn't be given a chance to do that.

    Besides, there's a whole cottage industry there for folks who love to teach and who would be willing to help reformed screw ups turn their lives around. :)
     
  9. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Aww that remedial math is making it so hard on the college athletes.
     
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  10. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    Is there not a high school exit exam in Cali? If you can't pass it even though you have actually been trying in school then you should realistically look at your chances of completing college. That's why there are so many teachers that pass their courses but fail on state competency exams.

    Goofoffs should be able to seek out a second chance but not at the cost of lowering standards.
     

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