Barack Obama’s Energy Policy: Unicorn Farts as the Fuel of Tomorrow

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Stephanie, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Stephanie
    Offline

    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2004
    Messages:
    70,236
    Thanks Received:
    10,817
    Trophy Points:
    2,040
    Ratings:
    +27,359
    links in article at site

    SNIP:
    Posted by Erick Erickson (Diary)

    Monday, March 19th at 4:46AM EDT

    15 Comments On Friday, the President of the United States accused his Republican opponents of being members of the Flat Earth Society because of their demands that the nation increase drilling.

    In no small bit of irony, the President who bitterly lamented the rise of ATM’s and internet travel options accused the GOP of wanting to bitterly cling to the past.

    But what of Barack Obama’s energy policy? He likes to tout wind and solar technologies and batteries, but it seems while he accuses the GOP of being flat earthers, the reality is that the President is himself anti-science when it comes to the reality of domestic energy needs.

    His solution to fueling our cars amounts to using unicorn farts as gas — which has just as much a chance of happening as the mythic battery powered cross country run.

    The facts are pretty simple. As a matter of both science and reality, battery technology is neither good enough nor cheap enough to supply American needs relating to transportation. Even were there batteries available for vehicles, the cost of conversion for the tens of millions of cars on the road right now would be cost prohibitive and increasing fuel standards, resulting in smaller and smaller cars, penalize families. Try piling a family of four in a Prius for a trip to grand mom’s house for Spring Break. The luggage and leg room will make for an exciting time.

    Even beyond the family car, a battery will not put an 18 wheeler on the road, a 747 in the air, or a locomotive on its rails. Americans depend on crude oil right now and in the future. To cling to the hope of a battery that can meet American automotive needs is anti-science and as realistic as fueling our future with unicorn farts. See Charles Lane at the Washington Post for more on the President’s crusade against science.

    read it all with comments..
    Barack Obama’s Energy Policy: Unicorn Farts as the Fuel of Tomorrow | RedState
     
  2. Seawytch
    Offline

    Seawytch Information isnt Advocacy

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    28,998
    Thanks Received:
    3,962
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Location:
    Peaking out from the redwoods
    Ratings:
    +7,043
    Hmmm...now let's say only 10% of the vehicles on US roads were electric vehicles...how much less oil would that be? What if, say, another 10% were alternative fuel vehicles?

    Man...a reduction in demand of 20%? My guess is that it would translate to a lot of fossil fuel, yes?

    This is bad because?
     
  3. Conservative
    Offline

    Conservative Type 40

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    17,082
    Thanks Received:
    2,026
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +2,030
    There are two major roadblocks to increasing the number of all electric or even hybrid-electric vehicles in the US.

    We do not have the charging infrastructure yet.

    Battery life is still too short for the average driver (sorry, 40miles before a charge isn't going to cut it).


    If we could trim the budget enough in other areas, I'd like to see some of those savings applied to setting up the infrastructure for charging. We didn't have the infrastructure for the gas engine at the beginning either, but it came eventually.

    As for the battery life, that is coming. Private industry is making that happen. As the technology improves, so will battery life and charge time.
     
  4. Conservative
    Offline

    Conservative Type 40

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    17,082
    Thanks Received:
    2,026
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +2,030
    I saw something on tv last night, saying that San Diego or someplace like that was using 20% bio-fuel as a pilot program, and doing quite well with it.
     
  5. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,466
    Thanks Received:
    5,414
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,310
    Charging infrastructure is quick and easy to develop, and better batteries are on the way. The Leaf doubles your figure, and the Tesla does 8 times your figure. There are batteries that have been lab tested that would give that Tesla legs of over 1000 miles on one charge. And the materials are cheaper than present batteries. Of course, lab built is sometimes hard to translate into manufacturing, but with the prize so great, we will see a battery developed with much higher energy density at a much cheaper price than the present batteries.

    'Electric Highway' opens in Oregon | Fox News

    In fact, there is already a short section of the electric hiway on I-5.
     
  6. Seawytch
    Offline

    Seawytch Information isnt Advocacy

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    28,998
    Thanks Received:
    3,962
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Location:
    Peaking out from the redwoods
    Ratings:
    +7,043
    40 miles is plenty sufficient for most people's commutes...even mine if I could charge at work.

    For what Americans spend on fossil fuels in a week, we could have battery swap stations from coast to coast.
     
  7. Conservative
    Offline

    Conservative Type 40

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    17,082
    Thanks Received:
    2,026
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +2,030
    I have heard about Tesla's battery. I'm a little skeptical, until they support their press releases on this by letting outsiders test the battery, or until they sell the technology and it's duplicated. I think an ideal way to set up the charging infrastructure is to set up quick charge stations at typical gas stations. Swipe your ATM, charge, and go. Between the power company and the station owners, I'm sure they could come up with a plan to cover the cost of the installation/maintenance of the charging stations.
     
  8. Conservative
    Offline

    Conservative Type 40

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    17,082
    Thanks Received:
    2,026
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +2,030
    Not sure about the swap thing. Those batteries are 10 times the size of a typical car battery, and are not easy to swap out. I've heard the cost of a new battery for those cars estimated at 7,000 and higher. Anyway, they are supposed to last for 10 years or something, so I think the quick charging stations would work out better.
     
  9. Wry Catcher
    Offline

    Wry Catcher Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    31,745
    Thanks Received:
    4,242
    Trophy Points:
    1,160
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Ratings:
    +8,155
    As usual the left coast will lead the nation in new ideas and technology and the rest of the nation will follow in time. Every major car manufacturer is selling a hybrid or all electric car now, and many start ups are ready to go to market.
     
  10. Seawytch
    Offline

    Seawytch Information isnt Advocacy

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    28,998
    Thanks Received:
    3,962
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Location:
    Peaking out from the redwoods
    Ratings:
    +7,043
    Charging is often too slow. Even on a fast charge it takes close to 20 minutes to charge a battery. Swapping stations are the way to go...

    A Better Place
     

Share This Page