Arctic ice cap continues to melt

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Chris, Aug 29, 2010.

  1. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    As of August 16, 2010, Arctic ice extent was 5.95 million square kilometers (2.30 million square miles),1.68 million square kilometers (649,000 square miles) below the 1979 to 2000 average.

    Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis
     
  2. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    so does your brain.
     
  3. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. SFC Ollie
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    SFC Ollie Still Marching

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    Yet in 1906 the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen in his 47 tonne sloop

    [​IMG]

    Sailed through the Northwest passage. A wooden ship with a sail!

    Seems as though we have only been tracking the actual amount of Ice for about 35 years or so. So how do we make any real comparisons?
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
  5. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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  6. Defiant1
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    Defiant1 Gold Member

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    And yet I still won't be able to turn my ice maker off.
     
  7. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    Cold empties Bolivian rivers of fish
    Antarctic cold snap kills millions of aquatic animals in the Amazon.


    Anna Petherick


    The San Julián fish farm in the Santa Cruz department of Bolivia lost 15 tonnes of pacú fish in the extreme cold.
    Never TejerinaWith high Andean peaks and a humid tropical forest, Bolivia is a country of ecological extremes. But during the Southern Hemisphere's recent winter, unusually low temperatures in part of the country's tropical region hit freshwater species hard, killing an estimated 6 million fish and thousands of alligators, turtles and river dolphins.

    Scientists who have visited the affected rivers say the event is the biggest ecological disaster Bolivia has known, and, as an example of a sudden climatic change wreaking havoc on wildlife, it is unprecedented in recorded history.

    "There's just a huge number of dead fish," says Michel Jégu, a researcher from the Institute for Developmental Research in Marseilles, France, who is currently working at the Noel Kempff Mercado Natural History Museum in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. "In the rivers near Santa Cruz there's about 1,000 dead fish for every 100 metres of river."

    Cold empties Bolivian rivers of fish : Nature News


    http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100827/full/news.2010.437.html






    Yup..............more bad news for the k00ks!!!!!

    Tell me this isnt a mental condition amongst the environmental hysterics?? Did these people never get bithday candles on their cakes or something?? Hot dogs on a bun without the hot dog???? This is a mental condition.............one where you can only see half of available information because your mind cant embrace it somehow!!! Its fcukking fascinating!!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Three years to get a seventy foot boat throught the Northwest Passage. Right now, you could put a container ship through that passage. And the Northeast Passage is open, as well.

    The American Experience | Alone on the Ice | People & Events | Roald Amundsen

    In 1903 he established himself as a sailor and explorer of the first order when he successfully led a 70-foot fishing boat through the entire length of the Northwest Passage, a treacherous ice-bound route that wound between the northern Canadian mainland and Canada's Arctic islands. The arduous journey took three years to complete as Amundsen and his crew had to wait while the frozen sea around them thawed enough to allow for navigation. Soon after his return to Norway, he learned that Englishman Ernest Shackleton was setting out of an attempt to reach the South Pole. Shackleton would be forced to abandon his quest a mere 97 miles short of the Pole. Amundsen studied all he could of Shackleton's attempt and began the long process of preparing for his own. He was as highly regarded for his skills in organization and planning as he was for his expertise as an explorer. Amundsen, who was thought to be "taciturn under the best of circumstances," took special measures to be sure members of his crew possessed personalities suitable to long polar voyages. Crew members onboard his ships knew he was firm but fair, and affectionately referred to him as "the chief."

    Two freightors through the Northeast Passage.

    Cargo ships navigate Northeast Passage for the first time - Times Online

    Cargo ships navigate Northeast Passage for the first timeTony Halpin in Moscow
    It is both a symbol of global warming and a potentially lucrative new trade route between Europe and Asia.

    Two German container ships have successfully navigated the Russian Northeast Passage across Arctic waters from the Pacific for the first time in a voyage considered impossible until a few years ago.

    The journey through formerly frozen seas promises to transform Russia’s neglected Siberian coast and reduce transport costs for goods taken from Asia to the European Union.

    During the latter half of the nineteenth century, many seaman left their bones in the arctic seeking the Northwest Passage. Yes, we do know that the present melt is unprecedented in modern times.
     
  9. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    SCORE ONE: rocks. :thup:
     
  10. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Uhhhh maybe not. Definately a cute publicity stunt but why take the risk when you can take the well travelled NorthEast passage and not risk the ice that will still be there. Please note the emphasis on double hulls. That means the ice is still there.



    The problem for Canada is that all the routes for a Northwest Passage involve shallow and/or narrow straits between various islands in the country’s Arctic archipelago, and the prevailing winds and currents in the Arctic Ocean tend to push whatever loose sea ice there is into those straits. It is unlikely that cargo ships that are not double-hulled and strengthened against ice will ever get insurance for the passage at an affordable price.

    Whereas the Northeast Passage is mostly open water (once the ice retreats from the Russian coast), and there is already a major infrastructure of ports and nuclear-powered ice-breakers in the region. If the distances are roughly comparable, shippers will prefer the Northeast Passage every time—and the distances are comparable.

    Just look at the Arctic Ocean on a globe, rather than in the familiar flat-earth Mercator projection. It is instantly obvious that the distance is the same whether shipping between Europe and East Asia crosses the Arctic Ocean by running along the Russia’s Arctic coast (the Northeast Passage) or weaving between Canada’s Arctic islands (the Northwest Passage).

    The same is true for cargo traveling between Europe and the west coast of North America. The Northwest Passage will never be commercially viable


    Gwynne Dyer: Northwest Passage will never be commercially viable | Vancouver, Canada | Straight.com
     

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