Why Go to College?

candycorn

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Seriously. Answer the question.

The one obvious reason to go to college is to prepare oneself for a "profession" (e.g., accountant, engineer) or a "Profession" (Doctor, lawyer), or possibly to prepare oneself to be a teacher at one level or another (of which there is never any shortage).

One could also argue, I suppose, that a generic college degree is a "credential" that some employers recognize for jobs and/or careers that require intelligence and task-oriented skills, but no specific knowledge, such as Project Manager, Sales person, Retail or Restaurant manager, etc. Government, as employer, often requires a generic college degree for many positions.

But again, this second category is still going to college as preparation for a work career.

What other reason is there to go to college? What is the rationale, for example, for spending a quarter million dollars to study English Literature? You could get virtually the same education with a library card and access to the internet. If you are truly interested in English Lit, there is NO REASON to go to college to study it, at great cost in money and time. And I have chosen English Literature as an example but there are literally scores of other similarly "worthless" college majors - many of which include the word, "Studies" - for which virtually the same education can be had literally for free at one's local library and on line. Ethnic Studies? There are thousands of books, hundreds of sources of information to guide you to the best ones, countless on-line lectures and other sources of real-time information for those who choose to seek it out. It is literally a waste of time and money to go to college to pursue "Ethnic Studies." Even if it's not your money.

Some argue that "education" is itself a valuable thing, just as the beauty and smell of a flower are valuable things, and need no functional justification. To this I say, "Hogwash." This may be true for the monied class (who will never have to work to support themselves), but for working class people this is preposterous.

I submit that for many in college, the experience is nothing more than a justification to delay assumption of the obligations of adulthood, mainly, the social obligation to support oneself with gainful employment.

Consider that "adolescence" is a relatively new phenomenon. In the early days of Harvard University, for example, the typical starting student was 13-14 years old. That was - not coincidentally - the typical age at which a boy would start an apprenticeship, begin working on the family farm or business, or simply start working for whoever would have you. It is also the age at which jews do the bar mitzvah thing and Christians have "confirmation," signifying the advent, in both cases, of adulthood. Our society and culture have created the phenomenon of adolescence: a period between physical maturity (13-14) and adulthood, where there are essentially no real responsibilities, and it now expands into one's 20's for many Americans.

And in these days when "free college" is seriously bandied about as a possible public financial responsibility, is there ANY POSSIBLE JUSTIFICATION for imposing on the innocent taxpayers the obligation to pay for English Literature degrees?

In short, NO.

So, other than in preparation for a JOB (or whatever you want to call it), what rational purpose is served by going to college? How are the expense and time justified where ALL information is available for free, and particularly when there is the hidden expense of the earnings that will not occur while the student is wasting his time in college?

Is a degree in Theology worthless? What about History? Archeology or Anthropology? What about Communications or Criminal Justice?
 

harmonica

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Seriously. Answer the question.

The one obvious reason to go to college is to prepare oneself for a "profession" (e.g., accountant, engineer) or a "Profession" (Doctor, lawyer), or possibly to prepare oneself to be a teacher at one level or another (of which there is never any shortage).

One could also argue, I suppose, that a generic college degree is a "credential" that some employers recognize for jobs and/or careers that require intelligence and task-oriented skills, but no specific knowledge, such as Project Manager, Sales person, Retail or Restaurant manager, etc. Government, as employer, often requires a generic college degree for many positions.

But again, this second category is still going to college as preparation for a work career.

What other reason is there to go to college? What is the rationale, for example, for spending a quarter million dollars to study English Literature? You could get virtually the same education with a library card and access to the internet. If you are truly interested in English Lit, there is NO REASON to go to college to study it, at great cost in money and time. And I have chosen English Literature as an example but there are literally scores of other similarly "worthless" college majors - many of which include the word, "Studies" - for which virtually the same education can be had literally for free at one's local library and on line. Ethnic Studies? There are thousands of books, hundreds of sources of information to guide you to the best ones, countless on-line lectures and other sources of real-time information for those who choose to seek it out. It is literally a waste of time and money to go to college to pursue "Ethnic Studies." Even if it's not your money.

Some argue that "education" is itself a valuable thing, just as the beauty and smell of a flower are valuable things, and need no functional justification. To this I say, "Hogwash." This may be true for the monied class (who will never have to work to support themselves), but for working class people this is preposterous.

I submit that for many in college, the experience is nothing more than a justification to delay assumption of the obligations of adulthood, mainly, the social obligation to support oneself with gainful employment.

Consider that "adolescence" is a relatively new phenomenon. In the early days of Harvard University, for example, the typical starting student was 13-14 years old. That was - not coincidentally - the typical age at which a boy would start an apprenticeship, begin working on the family farm or business, or simply start working for whoever would have you. It is also the age at which jews do the bar mitzvah thing and Christians have "confirmation," signifying the advent, in both cases, of adulthood. Our society and culture have created the phenomenon of adolescence: a period between physical maturity (13-14) and adulthood, where there are essentially no real responsibilities, and it now expands into one's 20's for many Americans.

And in these days when "free college" is seriously bandied about as a possible public financial responsibility, is there ANY POSSIBLE JUSTIFICATION for imposing on the innocent taxpayers the obligation to pay for English Literature degrees?

In short, NO.

So, other than in preparation for a JOB (or whatever you want to call it), what rational purpose is served by going to college? How are the expense and time justified where ALL information is available for free, and particularly when there is the hidden expense of the earnings that will not occur while the student is wasting his time in college?
.....make more $$$$$ !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! instead of working as a shithead for the rest of your life --doing tedious crap
 

Tipsycatlover

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What happens to those who do not qualify for college DS? A blue collar job for $15 an hour? Do you expect people to actually work hard for that? I sure as heck don't. Pretend to pay me I pretend to work.
College degrees just to have a college degree do not qualify anyone for good paying jobs. They end up baristas at Starbucks or sign spinners.

College for a profession is what pays. Other than that go to a trade school where you can make some real money. Probably more than an entry level engineer.
 

fncceo

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To study Home Economics ...

 

Tipsycatlover

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Seriously. Answer the question.

The one obvious reason to go to college is to prepare oneself for a "profession" (e.g., accountant, engineer) or a "Profession" (Doctor, lawyer), or possibly to prepare oneself to be a teacher at one level or another (of which there is never any shortage).

One could also argue, I suppose, that a generic college degree is a "credential" that some employers recognize for jobs and/or careers that require intelligence and task-oriented skills, but no specific knowledge, such as Project Manager, Sales person, Retail or Restaurant manager, etc. Government, as employer, often requires a generic college degree for many positions.

But again, this second category is still going to college as preparation for a work career.

What other reason is there to go to college? What is the rationale, for example, for spending a quarter million dollars to study English Literature? You could get virtually the same education with a library card and access to the internet. If you are truly interested in English Lit, there is NO REASON to go to college to study it, at great cost in money and time. And I have chosen English Literature as an example but there are literally scores of other similarly "worthless" college majors - many of which include the word, "Studies" - for which virtually the same education can be had literally for free at one's local library and on line. Ethnic Studies? There are thousands of books, hundreds of sources of information to guide you to the best ones, countless on-line lectures and other sources of real-time information for those who choose to seek it out. It is literally a waste of time and money to go to college to pursue "Ethnic Studies." Even if it's not your money.

Some argue that "education" is itself a valuable thing, just as the beauty and smell of a flower are valuable things, and need no functional justification. To this I say, "Hogwash." This may be true for the monied class (who will never have to work to support themselves), but for working class people this is preposterous.

I submit that for many in college, the experience is nothing more than a justification to delay assumption of the obligations of adulthood, mainly, the social obligation to support oneself with gainful employment.

Consider that "adolescence" is a relatively new phenomenon. In the early days of Harvard University, for example, the typical starting student was 13-14 years old. That was - not coincidentally - the typical age at which a boy would start an apprenticeship, begin working on the family farm or business, or simply start working for whoever would have you. It is also the age at which jews do the bar mitzvah thing and Christians have "confirmation," signifying the advent, in both cases, of adulthood. Our society and culture have created the phenomenon of adolescence: a period between physical maturity (13-14) and adulthood, where there are essentially no real responsibilities, and it now expands into one's 20's for many Americans.

And in these days when "free college" is seriously bandied about as a possible public financial responsibility, is there ANY POSSIBLE JUSTIFICATION for imposing on the innocent taxpayers the obligation to pay for English Literature degrees?

In short, NO.

So, other than in preparation for a JOB (or whatever you want to call it), what rational purpose is served by going to college? How are the expense and time justified where ALL information is available for free, and particularly when there is the hidden expense of the earnings that will not occur while the student is wasting his time in college?

Is a degree in Theology worthless? What about History? Archeology or Anthropology? What about Communications or Criminal Justice?
Theology, History, archeology, and anthropology are all worthless. Communications and criminal justice are worthless on their own. Degrees in humanities are mostly worthless. I had a file clerk that had a master's degree in anthropology.
 

HenryBHough

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At the end of my first year of J-school I took a summer job and, within a few weeks, had a graduate of the same school working for me. He had no experience; I had three years "apprenticeship" with two old-fashioned journalists. One print; one broadcast. The poor bugger who was deep in debt and was working under me showed little ability. I built a career on the experience, leaving the university behind as summer turned to autumn. He got fired but quickly found new work teaching journalism. Go figure.
 

candycorn

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Seriously. Answer the question.

The one obvious reason to go to college is to prepare oneself for a "profession" (e.g., accountant, engineer) or a "Profession" (Doctor, lawyer), or possibly to prepare oneself to be a teacher at one level or another (of which there is never any shortage).

One could also argue, I suppose, that a generic college degree is a "credential" that some employers recognize for jobs and/or careers that require intelligence and task-oriented skills, but no specific knowledge, such as Project Manager, Sales person, Retail or Restaurant manager, etc. Government, as employer, often requires a generic college degree for many positions.

But again, this second category is still going to college as preparation for a work career.

What other reason is there to go to college? What is the rationale, for example, for spending a quarter million dollars to study English Literature? You could get virtually the same education with a library card and access to the internet. If you are truly interested in English Lit, there is NO REASON to go to college to study it, at great cost in money and time. And I have chosen English Literature as an example but there are literally scores of other similarly "worthless" college majors - many of which include the word, "Studies" - for which virtually the same education can be had literally for free at one's local library and on line. Ethnic Studies? There are thousands of books, hundreds of sources of information to guide you to the best ones, countless on-line lectures and other sources of real-time information for those who choose to seek it out. It is literally a waste of time and money to go to college to pursue "Ethnic Studies." Even if it's not your money.

Some argue that "education" is itself a valuable thing, just as the beauty and smell of a flower are valuable things, and need no functional justification. To this I say, "Hogwash." This may be true for the monied class (who will never have to work to support themselves), but for working class people this is preposterous.

I submit that for many in college, the experience is nothing more than a justification to delay assumption of the obligations of adulthood, mainly, the social obligation to support oneself with gainful employment.

Consider that "adolescence" is a relatively new phenomenon. In the early days of Harvard University, for example, the typical starting student was 13-14 years old. That was - not coincidentally - the typical age at which a boy would start an apprenticeship, begin working on the family farm or business, or simply start working for whoever would have you. It is also the age at which jews do the bar mitzvah thing and Christians have "confirmation," signifying the advent, in both cases, of adulthood. Our society and culture have created the phenomenon of adolescence: a period between physical maturity (13-14) and adulthood, where there are essentially no real responsibilities, and it now expands into one's 20's for many Americans.

And in these days when "free college" is seriously bandied about as a possible public financial responsibility, is there ANY POSSIBLE JUSTIFICATION for imposing on the innocent taxpayers the obligation to pay for English Literature degrees?

In short, NO.

So, other than in preparation for a JOB (or whatever you want to call it), what rational purpose is served by going to college? How are the expense and time justified where ALL information is available for free, and particularly when there is the hidden expense of the earnings that will not occur while the student is wasting his time in college?

Is a degree in Theology worthless? What about History? Archeology or Anthropology? What about Communications or Criminal Justice?
Theology, History, archeology, and anthropology are all worthless. Communications and criminal justice are worthless on their own. Degrees in humanities are mostly worthless. I had a file clerk that had a master's degree in anthropology.
Coming from an avowed racist...your opinion is worthless.

Good to know you've shunned religion; much like your blob.
 

Tipsycatlover

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Seriously. Answer the question.

The one obvious reason to go to college is to prepare oneself for a "profession" (e.g., accountant, engineer) or a "Profession" (Doctor, lawyer), or possibly to prepare oneself to be a teacher at one level or another (of which there is never any shortage).

One could also argue, I suppose, that a generic college degree is a "credential" that some employers recognize for jobs and/or careers that require intelligence and task-oriented skills, but no specific knowledge, such as Project Manager, Sales person, Retail or Restaurant manager, etc. Government, as employer, often requires a generic college degree for many positions.

But again, this second category is still going to college as preparation for a work career.

What other reason is there to go to college? What is the rationale, for example, for spending a quarter million dollars to study English Literature? You could get virtually the same education with a library card and access to the internet. If you are truly interested in English Lit, there is NO REASON to go to college to study it, at great cost in money and time. And I have chosen English Literature as an example but there are literally scores of other similarly "worthless" college majors - many of which include the word, "Studies" - for which virtually the same education can be had literally for free at one's local library and on line. Ethnic Studies? There are thousands of books, hundreds of sources of information to guide you to the best ones, countless on-line lectures and other sources of real-time information for those who choose to seek it out. It is literally a waste of time and money to go to college to pursue "Ethnic Studies." Even if it's not your money.

Some argue that "education" is itself a valuable thing, just as the beauty and smell of a flower are valuable things, and need no functional justification. To this I say, "Hogwash." This may be true for the monied class (who will never have to work to support themselves), but for working class people this is preposterous.

I submit that for many in college, the experience is nothing more than a justification to delay assumption of the obligations of adulthood, mainly, the social obligation to support oneself with gainful employment.

Consider that "adolescence" is a relatively new phenomenon. In the early days of Harvard University, for example, the typical starting student was 13-14 years old. That was - not coincidentally - the typical age at which a boy would start an apprenticeship, begin working on the family farm or business, or simply start working for whoever would have you. It is also the age at which jews do the bar mitzvah thing and Christians have "confirmation," signifying the advent, in both cases, of adulthood. Our society and culture have created the phenomenon of adolescence: a period between physical maturity (13-14) and adulthood, where there are essentially no real responsibilities, and it now expands into one's 20's for many Americans.

And in these days when "free college" is seriously bandied about as a possible public financial responsibility, is there ANY POSSIBLE JUSTIFICATION for imposing on the innocent taxpayers the obligation to pay for English Literature degrees?

In short, NO.

So, other than in preparation for a JOB (or whatever you want to call it), what rational purpose is served by going to college? How are the expense and time justified where ALL information is available for free, and particularly when there is the hidden expense of the earnings that will not occur while the student is wasting his time in college?

Is a degree in Theology worthless? What about History? Archeology or Anthropology? What about Communications or Criminal Justice?
Theology, History, archeology, and anthropology are all worthless. Communications and criminal justice are worthless on their own. Degrees in humanities are mostly worthless. I had a file clerk that had a master's degree in anthropology.
Coming from an avowed racist...your opinion is worthless.

Good to know you've shunned religion; much like your blob.
Oh puleeze. You are an enemy democrat why would anything you say have meaning. You're an enemy!!!!
 

Tijn Von Ingersleben

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College is worthless for the working class unless required for one's chosen vocation. Teachers, doctors, lawyers, engineers all require education and credentialing only available through higher learning institutions.
Otherwise college is pointless.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Seriously. Answer the question.

The one obvious reason to go to college is to prepare oneself for a "profession" (e.g., accountant, engineer) or a "Profession" (Doctor, lawyer), or possibly to prepare oneself to be a teacher at one level or another (of which there is never any shortage).

One could also argue, I suppose, that a generic college degree is a "credential" that some employers recognize for jobs and/or careers that require intelligence and task-oriented skills, but no specific knowledge, such as Project Manager, Sales person, Retail or Restaurant manager, etc. Government, as employer, often requires a generic college degree for many positions.

But again, this second category is still going to college as preparation for a work career.

What other reason is there to go to college? What is the rationale, for example, for spending a quarter million dollars to study English Literature? You could get virtually the same education with a library card and access to the internet. If you are truly interested in English Lit, there is NO REASON to go to college to study it, at great cost in money and time. And I have chosen English Literature as an example but there are literally scores of other similarly "worthless" college majors - many of which include the word, "Studies" - for which virtually the same education can be had literally for free at one's local library and on line. Ethnic Studies? There are thousands of books, hundreds of sources of information to guide you to the best ones, countless on-line lectures and other sources of real-time information for those who choose to seek it out. It is literally a waste of time and money to go to college to pursue "Ethnic Studies." Even if it's not your money.

Some argue that "education" is itself a valuable thing, just as the beauty and smell of a flower are valuable things, and need no functional justification. To this I say, "Hogwash." This may be true for the monied class (who will never have to work to support themselves), but for working class people this is preposterous.

I submit that for many in college, the experience is nothing more than a justification to delay assumption of the obligations of adulthood, mainly, the social obligation to support oneself with gainful employment.

Consider that "adolescence" is a relatively new phenomenon. In the early days of Harvard University, for example, the typical starting student was 13-14 years old. That was - not coincidentally - the typical age at which a boy would start an apprenticeship, begin working on the family farm or business, or simply start working for whoever would have you. It is also the age at which jews do the bar mitzvah thing and Christians have "confirmation," signifying the advent, in both cases, of adulthood. Our society and culture have created the phenomenon of adolescence: a period between physical maturity (13-14) and adulthood, where there are essentially no real responsibilities, and it now expands into one's 20's for many Americans.

And in these days when "free college" is seriously bandied about as a possible public financial responsibility, is there ANY POSSIBLE JUSTIFICATION for imposing on the innocent taxpayers the obligation to pay for English Literature degrees?

In short, NO.

So, other than in preparation for a JOB (or whatever you want to call it), what rational purpose is served by going to college? How are the expense and time justified where ALL information is available for free, and particularly when there is the hidden expense of the earnings that will not occur while the student is wasting his time in college?

Is a degree in Theology worthless? What about History? Archeology or Anthropology? What about Communications or Criminal Justice?
Theology, History, archeology, and anthropology are all worthless. Communications and criminal justice are worthless on their own. Degrees in humanities are mostly worthless. I had a file clerk that had a master's degree in anthropology.
Those subjects are great if you want to be a teacher, but not much else.
 

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