Unexplainable Phenomenon - Genome Doubling Event Occured And Created Flowers

NumburrOne

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Scientists who sequenced the Amborella genome say that it provides conclusive evidence that the ancestor of all flowering plants, including Amborella, evolved following a "genome doubling event" that occurred about 200 million years ago. doomed
Some duplicated genes were lost over time but others took on new functions, including contributions to the development of floral organs.

"Genome doubling may, therefore, offer an explanation to Darwin's "abominable mystery" -- the apparently abrupt proliferation of new species of flowering plants in fossil records dating to the Cretaceous period," said Claude dePamphilis of Penn State University. "Generations of scientists have worked to solve this puzzle," he added.

Comparative analyses of the Amborella genome are already providing scientists with a new perspective on the genetic origins of important traits in all flowering plants -- including all major food crop species

http://www.sciencenewsline.com/articles/...50043.html
 

QuickHitCurepon

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That sounds like what scientists twenty-five years ago were talking about could happen to humans through genetic experimentation someday (even though nearly impossible), when the cutoff point for growth in the genome would be neutralized and a doubling of growth would create "giants" twice our size or more. I do not know what the correlation is but there may be some way to bridge the gap between plants and animals and that is how they'd do it. :eusa_eh:
 
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NumburrOne

NumburrOne

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That sounds like what scientists twenty-five years ago were talking about could happen to humans through genetic experimentation someday (even though nearly impossible), when the cutoff point for growth in the genome would be neutralized and a doubling of growth would create "giants" twice our size or more. I do not know what the correlation is but there may be some way to bridge the gap between plants and animals and that is how they'd do it. :eusa_eh:
:eusa_pray:
 
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rdean

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Everyone knows God waved his hand, threw some magical pixiefairy dust, and wallah, there were trees. Clearly there is no such thing as evolution. Just ask God. He'll tell you. Go ahead, ask him. It's not like he doesn't exist.
 

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QuickHitCurepon

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Everyone knows God waved his hand, threw some magical pixiefairy dust, and wallah, there were trees. Clearly there is no such thing as evolution. Just ask God. He'll tell you. Go ahead, ask him. It's not like he doesn't exist.
Science does not preclude God. The Big Guy nurtures our understanding of it and guides it as best He and we can. Do not throw the baby out with the bathwater is probably what He says to wait for us to transcend our slow progress towards the most peaceful solutions to everything.
 

CrusaderFrank

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Everyone knows God waved his hand, threw some magical pixiefairy dust, and wallah, there were trees. Clearly there is no such thing as evolution. Just ask God. He'll tell you. Go ahead, ask him. It's not like he doesn't exist.
^ Translation: Evolution has no explanation for the OP
 
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rdean

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Everyone knows God waved his hand, threw some magical pixiefairy dust, and wallah, there were trees. Clearly there is no such thing as evolution. Just ask God. He'll tell you. Go ahead, ask him. It's not like he doesn't exist.
Science does not preclude God. The Big Guy nurtures our understanding of it and guides it as best He and we can. Do not throw the baby out with the bathwater is probably what He says to wait for us to transcend our slow progress towards the most peaceful solutions to everything.
So you've seen him? Where was he? And how come no more "miracles"? I like a good "miracle".
 

QuickHitCurepon

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Everyone knows God waved his hand, threw some magical pixiefairy dust, and wallah, there were trees. Clearly there is no such thing as evolution. Just ask God. He'll tell you. Go ahead, ask him. It's not like he doesn't exist.
Science does not preclude God. The Big Guy nurtures our understanding of it and guides it as best He and we can. Do not throw the baby out with the bathwater is probably what He says to wait for us to transcend our slow progress towards the most peaceful solutions to everything.
So you've seen him? Where was he? And how come no more "miracles"? I like a good "miracle".
What I posted was dogma or one belief. There are many others.
 

waltky

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Genome grafting from one plant to another...

Scientists shift medicinal properties from one plant to another
10 Sept.`15 WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A number of important drugs come from plants, but some medicinal plants are endangered or tricky to grow. For some scientists, finding ways to ensure ready access to these drugs has become a priority.
Researchers on Thursday said they have identified the genes that enable an endangered Himalayan plant to produce a chemical vital to making a widely used chemotherapy drug, and inserted them into an easily grown laboratory plant that then produced the same chemical. The endangered plant, called the mayapple, produces a precursor chemical to the chemotherapy drug etoposide, which is used in many patients with lung cancer, testicular cancer, brain cancer, lymphoma, leukemia and other cancers.

The researchers genetically engineered the easily grown laboratory plant Nicotiana benthamiana, a wild relative of tobacco, to make the chemical. "Many plant-based drugs are not found in large quantities in nature and are difficult to make in the lab," said Stanford University chemical engineering professor Elizabeth Sattely, who led the study published in the journal Science. "Mimicking the way nature makes these molecules is a promising alternative, but to do that we need to find the genes. This can be a major challenge because plant genomes can be very large and genes are hard to find," Sattely said.


Stanford chemical engineering professor Elizabeth Sattely explains how she produced a common cancer drug in a laboratory plant, in this undated handout picture courtesy of Stanford University.

The researchers said they discovered six genes from the mayapple plant that in combination with four previously known genes produce the chemical needed to make the chemotherapy drug. "We used these genes to engineer a wild relative of tobacco to make the drug precursor and think we could also use these genes to make the drug in other easy-to-grow organisms such as yeast," Sattely said.

The tobacco plant or yeast would provide the ability to produce the drug in a controlled laboratory setting. Researchers led by another Stanford scientist last month unveiled a new method to make potent painkilling opioids using bioengineered baker's yeast instead of poppies. "Producing plant-derived drugs in easy-to-grow plants or baker's yeast in many cases will be a much more efficient way to make these drugs," Sattely said. "This is currently being done for artemisinin (a malaria drug derived from the sweet wormwood plant), and will likely be the way we make morphine (derived from poppies) in the future."

Scientists shift medicinal properties from one plant to another
 

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