Turkey, Iran Undertake Joint Military Offensive Against Kurdish Rebels

High_Gravity

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Looks like the Kurds are going to have some rough days ahead of them, their enemies are coming after them from all sides.

Turkey, Iran Undertake Joint Military Offensive Against Kurdish Rebels



ANKARA, Turkey (AP) -- Turkey's prime minister on Sunday signaled a joint military offensive with Iran against their common enemy: Kurdish rebels based in northern Iraq.

Turkey and Iran were working together and "determined," Recep Tayyip Erdogan said.

"There is no question of any postponement," Erdogan said in a clear reference to a possible joint military operation against the main Kurdish rebel base on Qandil Mountain which sits on the Iraqi-Iranian border deep inside northern Iraq.

"I regret to say this but there will be a price for it," Erdogan said, apparently referring to possible military losses in a cross-border offensive against the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, which has been waging a war for autonomy in Turkey's southeast.

It was not immediately clear if the two countries are planning a highly risky and difficult ground offensive at Qandil, which has reportedly been turned into a mine field by the rebels to protect themselves.

The Party of Free Life of Kurdistan, or PEJAK, which is an offshoot of the PKK that the U.S. and the European Union have labeled a terrorist group, is also struggling for autonomy for Iran's Kurds because of alleged Tehran government discrimination. Kurds make up 14 percent of Iran's population.

Iranian artillery units often fire salvos at Qandil, and Turkish warplanes stage bombing raids against suspected rebel bases there, but the rebels reportedly rush into deep caves when they hear the whistling shells or the roar of the jets.

The Kurdish provinces of northern Iraq are the country's most stable and prosperous area. But to neighboring Iran and Turkey, both with large Kurdish minorities, they are something else: an inspiration and a support base for the Kurdish rebels in their own countries.

Turkey has already been pressing the U.S.-backed Iraqi government to clamp down on Kurdish guerrillas who use Iraq as a base. The Iranians and Turks fear Kurdish success in creating an autonomous region in northern Iraq, and the prosperity of their enclave, encourages their own Kurdish minorities.

The U.S. has been providing Turkey with intelligence from its Predator drones and now Erdogan says Washington is likely to agree to the deployment of Predators on Turkish soil once its troops leave Iraq at the end of this year. Turkey already operates some Israeli-made Heron drones to stage pinpoint attacks against the rebels.

Kurdish rebels have dramatically escalated their attacks in Turkey since July, killing dozens of security personnel and at least 10 civilians -- including three people in a car bombing in the Turkish capital last week.

On Saturday, the rebels attacked a Turkish army outpost, killing six soldiers and wounding 11 in the country's southeast, authorities said. Three rebels also were killed in the ensuing clash near the town of Pervari in Siirt province.

The attacks came after Turkish warplanes started to bomb suspected Kurdish rebel hideouts in neighboring northern Iraq, including the main rebel base on Qandil, in mid-August in response to the surge in rebel violence. Turkey's military claimed to have killed up to 160 rebels in airstrikes in August, but the rebels disputed it.

Erdogan said Friday that Turkey would only halt its military drive if the rebels "lay down their arms," days after confirming reports that government officials met with representatives of Kurdish rebels in Europe. The secret talks, which apparently failed to produce any tangible results, came to light after some websites posted an audio recording from an alleged 2010 meeting.

On Sunday, Erdogan left the door open for dialogue, while saying his country would maintain its fight against "terrorism."
Turkey, Iran Undertake Joint Military Offensive Against Kurdish Rebels
 

Ropey

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We've been talking about the upcoming genocide of the Kurds by Turkey, Iran and Iraq.

Human rights of Kurdish people in Turkey


Education

In Turkey, the only language of instruction in the education system is Turkish.[1] The Kurdish population of Turkey has long sought to have Kurdish included as a language of instruction in public schools as well as a subject. Several attempts at opening Kurdish instruction centers were stopped on technical grounds, such as wrong dimensions of doors. An experiment at running Kurdish-language schools was wound up in 2004 because of an apparent lack of interest.

Kurdish is permitted as a subject in universities, but in reality there are no such courses on offer.

Human rights of Kurdish people in Turkey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Assimilation​


Due to the large number of Turkish Kurds, successive governments have viewed the expression of a Kurdish identity as a potential threat to Turkish unity, a feeling that has been compounded since the armed rebellion initiated by the PKK in 1984. One of the main accusations of cultural assimilation relates to the state's historic suppression of the Kurdish language. Kurdish publications created throughout the 1960s and 1970s were shut down under various legal pretexts.[4] Following the military coup of 1980, the Kurdish language was officially prohibited in government institutions.[5]

US Congressman Bob Filner spoke of a "cultural genocide", stressing that "a way of life known as Kurdish is disappearing at an alarming rate".[6] Mark Levene suggests that the genocidal practices were not limited to cultural genocide, and that the events of the late 19th century continued until 1990.[7]

Certain academics have claimed that successive Turkish governments adopted a sustained genocide program against Kurds, aimed at their assimilation.[8] The genocide hypothesis remains, however, a minority view among historians, and is not endorsed by any nation or major organisation. Desmond Fernandes, a Senior Lecturer at De Montfort University, breaks the policy of the Turkish authorities into the following categories:[9]

1. Forced assimilation program, which involved, among other things, a ban of the Kurdish language, and the forced relocation of Kurds to non-Kurdish areas of Turkey.
2. The banning of any organizations opposed to category one.
3. The violent repression of any Kurdish resistance.
The accepted genocide of Kurds in Turkey
Since the Armenian genocide, Turkey has done very well to hide and disguise its dark history from the international community. But a shady past rarely dawns a bright future.

Instead, Turkey is re-branding itself with Europe-friendly terms to essentially get rid of what it has always wanted to be rid of. Turkey’s tidy up of its language: words with a distinct Kurdish origin wiped out and replaced. Indeed, anything that is not strictly Turkish has been linked to “terrorism” – a trigger word guaranteed to win the sympathies of the international community.

The Turkish constitution does not recognise Kurds in Turkey, and so often labels them as terrorists, providing a convenient scapegoat for military uprisings and other political issues. Thus, “terrorist” becomes a synonym for Kurds.

Turkey frequently argues that the PKK is a terrorist organisation; hence all Kurdish organisations are banned for what they may imply.

Turkey is desperately in need of an imaginary threat to its “national security”, “territorial integrity” and “sovereignty”, achieved by “separatist/terrorist” Kurds. The scale of the suffering Kurds and destruction of Kurdish homeland does not fit into any “terrorist” definition. In 1999, the death toll of Kurds killed in Turkish military operations increased to over 40,000. According to the figures published by Turkey’s own Parliament, 6,000 Kurdish villages were systematically evacuated of all inhabitants and 3,000,000 Kurds have been displaced. This sounds like an elimination of a people, a culture and a homeland.
KurdishMedia.com: News about Kurds and Kurdistan
 

Jroc

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Why would Obama help the Turks and the Iranians? Makes no sense to me. The Kurds were are allies in Iran, they were the people that didn't give us any trouble. What the hell's going on here?
 

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Is Obama’s Nobel Peace Prize solving Turkey-Kurds Conflict?




By Hamma Mirwaisi:

President Obama’s Nobel Peace Prize and his moral values, if he has any, is at stake if he continues to help Turkey to kill Kurds.

Has President Obama read the life and death of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr to understand the human values? In Turkey, the human rights of more than twenty million Kurds are violated every single day since the establishment of the Modern Republic of Turkey. Almost all the Presidents of Unite State of America, excluding President Woodrow Wilson, have had supported the unjust practices of the Turkish Governments against the Kurdish people.

Has President Obama read the life of President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela to learn from his sacrifices and his human rights values? The Islamic Government of Turkey under Recep Tayyip Erdogan does not have any respect for human rights.

The Prime minister of Turkey is using the most sophisticated technology and powerful weapons to kill Kurdish civilians and rebels in this war which Turkey has imposed on the Kurdish people with the help of the USA.

President Obama, everyone knows that his administration is under pressure because of the economic problems, but the US economy can be served better by peace between Turk and Kurds of Turkey. Those who are in business to make wealth by selling weapon to Turkey, are not serving the economic interest of the USA.

Wake up Mr. President, the Nobel Peace Prize committee thought about you differently. It is time for you to prove that you will do what President Nelson Mandela did when he refused to receive Ataturk international Peace Prize from Turkey because of the country’s human rights violation against the Kurdish people.
Is Obama
 
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Jroc

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The Turkey-Iran Pact

on Sep 16th, 2011


A hot war has been raging in northern Iraq since mid-July, and despite the casualties and the drama, it has gone virtually unreported by the international media.

The war was launched on July 16 by Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) troops in an effort to crush Iranian rebel Kurds who have sought refuge in the 12,000 foot high Qandil mountains that form the border between Iran and Iraq.

It began with cross-border shelling by Iranian artillery, air strikes, and several attempted ground incursions into Iraq by Iranian forces. But within ten days, NATO-ally Turkey openly joined the fray.

On whose side did Turkey fight? On behalf of the secular, pro-Western Free Life Party of Kurdistan (PJAK), whose bases in northern Iraq were under assault from the Islamist regime in Tehran? Think again.

The Turkish military sent 20 tanks into Iran at the invitation of the Iranian regime to support the flailing Iranian attack against the rebel Kurds. They also dispatched 300 Turkish Special Forces troops to Iran to conduct intelligence missions into the Qandil mountains using Heron surveillance drones purchased from Israel.

PJAK leader Rahman Haj Ahmadi told me that the Turkish drones were the most effective weapon the Iranian military used against them. “This limited our ability to move, but it didn’t matter much since most of our positions were underground,” he said.

The Turkish incursion marked just the latest instance of Turkey’s ongoing military and strategic alliance with Iran, an alliance that ought to give NATO allies pause, starting with the United States

The Turkey-Iran Pact | FrontPage Magazine
 

Ropey

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They wish to enter a war and carve up the arena. I believe that they will get their wishes, but not the outcome they expect.
 
OP
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High_Gravity

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Nobody wants the Kurds, the Iraqi government is more than happy to let the Iranians and Turks run wild in Northern Iraq as long as they are just killing Kurds, if Syria didn't have their own turmoil going on they would be in on this operation too. Its also ironic this joint Iranian/Turkish operation didn't start until the US started drawing down their forces in Iraq.
 

ekrem

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Which Kurds?

Barzani calls on PKK, PJAK to end attacks from Iraqi soil

Iraqi Kurdish leader Massoud Barzani urged the terrorist Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) and its Iranian wing the Party for a Free Life in Kurdistan (PJAK) to end attacks on Turkish and Iranian targets from Iraqi bases.

"We are in a difficult situation because there are two countries [Iran and Turkey] telling us to control our borders in order to avoid problems," Barzani said on Tuesday, speaking at a meeting with representatives of the Iraqi Kurdish administration to foreign countries. "But we are afraid to send forces to the borders for fear of a Kurdish-Kurdish war," he continued.

"The PKK and the PJAK are not taking the situation in the Kurdish region into consideration," Barzani said. "I call on the two sides to abandon the idea of achieving their rights via military means."

Just like the USA was attacked from Afghanistan, so are Iran and Turkey attacked from terrorist elements within North-Iraq.
It is the duty of the authorities in those regions to bring the responsible people to justice.
If they don't, they are the responsible ones when the violence comes to them.
 

Sallow

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Nobody wants the Kurds, the Iraqi government is more than happy to let the Iranians and Turks run wild in Northern Iraq as long as they are just killing Kurds, if Syria didn't have their own turmoil going on they would be in on this operation too. Its also ironic this joint Iranian/Turkish operation didn't start until the US started drawing down their forces in Iraq.
The PKK are terrorists. Helping terrorists is always a risky proposition. Bush, I am pretty sure, was funding the PKK up until they started bombing Turkey.

He probably got the message they were loose cannons. Like the muj.
 

ekrem

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On 20 September PKK made car-bomb in Turkish capital.
3 people killed and 34 injured.
The Associated Press: Report: Kurdish militants claim car bomb attack






On Monday a pregnant woman was killed, but her baby could only be saved for 1 day and died also.
Baby orphaned in Monday's PKK attack dies - Hurriyet Daily News



This week alone the PKK has kidnapped 12 school-teachers in South-East Turkey and kidnapped them to Iraq.
PKK kidnaps three more teachers in SE Turkey, total reaches 12 - Hurriyet Daily News
 
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Jroc

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Which Kurds?

Barzani calls on PKK, PJAK to end attacks from Iraqi soil

Iraqi Kurdish leader Massoud Barzani urged the terrorist Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) and its Iranian wing the Party for a Free Life in Kurdistan (PJAK) to end attacks on Turkish and Iranian targets from Iraqi bases.

"We are in a difficult situation because there are two countries [Iran and Turkey] telling us to control our borders in order to avoid problems," Barzani said on Tuesday, speaking at a meeting with representatives of the Iraqi Kurdish administration to foreign countries. "But we are afraid to send forces to the borders for fear of a Kurdish-Kurdish war," he continued.

"The PKK and the PJAK are not taking the situation in the Kurdish region into consideration," Barzani said. "I call on the two sides to abandon the idea of achieving their rights via military means."

Just like the USA was attacked from Afghanistan, so are Iran and Turkey attacked from terrorist elements within North-Iraq.
It is the duty of the authorities in those regions to bring the responsible people to justice.
If they don't, they are the responsible ones when the violence comes to them.
If you think it's good for Turkey and iran to invade Iraq with the intention of killing kurdish women and children you're crazy, and this kind of stuff will defiantly hurt Obama he's clueless... He should be involved in brokering some kind of peace deal there instead of siding with the wack jobs
 

ekrem

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If you think it's good for Turkey and iran to invade Iraq with the intention of killing kurdish women and children you're crazy, and this kind of stuff will defiantly hurt Obama he's clueless... He should be involved in brokering some kind of peace deal there instead of siding with the wack jobs
We don't bomb the Kurdistan-Regional-Administration, and Bagdad or Erbil have no authority over the regions from which PKK/PJAK operates. It is no man's land, where the PKK/PJAK has checkpoints and asserts full authority over the region.
 

ekrem

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The main Camp of the PKK/Pjak is on a mountain-rage spanning from Iraq into Iran (Kandil mountains).
So it is normal, that Turkey will co-operate with Iran because there needs to be a military presence on Iranian side of Kandil mountain-range. Otherwise, the terrorists will either flee into Iran or try to infiltrate Turkey from Iran.
PKK with its offshoot PJAK also attacks Iran.

In the spirit of good, friendly and neighborly relations both Iran and Turkey co-operate against the civilian-killing terrorist threat from North-Iraq.
My common sense tells me, that the whole PKK/PJAK situation is temporary.
 

ekrem

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The PKK are terrorists. Helping terrorists is always a risky proposition. Bush, I am pretty sure, was funding the PKK up until they started bombing Turkey.

He probably got the message they were loose cannons. Like the muj.
I don't know about Iran, but Turkey only attacks the PKK and no-man's land within Iraq.
We don't bomb or attack the KRG or territories where State Authority is exerted over.
Why would we bomb/attack our own investments?

Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) - www.krg.org
Since the US-led invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein's Baathist regime in 2003, Turkish firms have constituted over 70 percent of the foreign commercial presence in Iraq's northern Kurdish region.
Gen Petraeus in 2007
BBC NEWS | Middle East | Petraeus concern for Turkey raid in Iraq
He said the level of investment by Turkish firms in northern Iraq was somewhere between $8bn and $10bn
 

ekrem

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Ishik University in Erbil (KRG) was built by Turks and is operated by Turkish private investment.

Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) - Barzani and Turkish MPs attend the opening of Ishik University in Erbil

Turkish FM in Erbil at its opening:


Besides the University we've also built 14 schools within KRG which are operated by Turkish foundations.
Feza Educational Institutions, with which Ishik schools are affiliated, have 20 schools in Dohuk, Arbil, Sulaimaniya, Soran, Halabja, Mosul, Kirkuk, Baghdad and Ramadi and a university in Arbil. Of these schools, 14 are under the jurisdiction of the Kurdistan Regional Government.
Shining Turkish schools cement Iraq

We bring them investments and education.
Despite this some usmb.com "I've visited that place twice"-people still make baseless claims, equating the PKK/PJAK with Kurdish people.
 

ekrem

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Besides the University we've also built 14 schools within KRG which are operated by Turkish foundations.
Feza Educational Institutions, with which Ishik schools are affiliated, have 20 schools in Dohuk, Arbil, Sulaimaniya, Soran, Halabja, Mosul, Kirkuk, Baghdad and Ramadi and a university in Arbil. Of these schools, 14 are under the jurisdiction of the Kurdistan Regional Government.
Shining Turkish schools cement Iraq

We bring them investments and education.
Despite this some usmb.com "I've visited that place twice"-people still make baseless claims, equating the PKK/PJAK with Kurdish people.
One of these schools is Bilkent College.
It is built, financed and operated by Bilkent University of Ankara, which is one of best education centers in Turkey.

Bilkent Erbil College


 
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ekrem

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PM Erdogan and clan-leader Barzani open Erbil International Airport, which was built by Turkish companies





 

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