The U.S. Election Thru Chinese Eyes

Tom Paine 1949

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On the Chinese Internet popular discussion of the American election was rather open, with 12 billion hits on Weibo’s main hashtag, #“American election” ( #美国大选 měiguó dàxuǎn) # as of 3 weeks ago. Chinese internet users have a reasonably clear view of what was at stake in the American election. Here is a summary from SupChina (11/9), an important China-specializing non-profit English news source critical of the CCP:

Chinese social media users react to Biden’s presidential win

While most comments were celebratory, some people soberly reminded others that a peaceful transition of power was unlikely to happen, especially given Trump’s “desperate” attempts to paint the voting process as fraudulent. “The win was easy. Now, the real challenge: How to kick Trump out of the White House?” a Weibo user said, while another wrote, “Trump should learn how to accept defeat like a real grown-up. This only gets more embarrassing for him the longer he throws a temper tantrum.”

Not everyone was delighted at Trump’s defeat, though. On Weibo, a number of commenters confessed that while they hated Trump’s anti-Chinese rhetoric and erratic behavior, his presidency was entertaining to witness, and that they would miss all the memes and jokes inspired by him. “Trump running America is the only reality show that I’ve followed closely. It pains me to say goodbye to it,” wrote an Internet user. “Trump lost his presidency. We lost a great comedian,” another one said.

Under his four-year tenure in the White House, Trump has blown hot and cold on China, calling Xí Jìnpíng 习近平 a “great leader” and hyping a trade deal at some times, and at other times casting Beijing as America’s main adversary, responsible for the disappearance of manufacturing jobs and then a “Chinese plague.” In the wake of Biden’s win, a number of Chinese people hoped that the President-elect would bring U.S.-China relations onto a more stable track — and ideally, heighten prospects for cooperation.

The optimism, however, wasn’t felt by everyone. Some skeptics raised the question as to whether a Biden White House would see China more as a partner than a threat. “It really doesn’t matter who’s the next U.S. president. China and the U.S. are destined to be strategic rivals,” a Weibo user wrote. “The only thing under our control ultimately is our determination to make China stronger.”


Here is another SupChina feature, this one on Chinese-Americans who played a role in helping Biden win Georgia. I note that Chinese and Asian-American voters typically have been very hesitant to involve themselves in heated American politics. Ironically, many conservative anti-communist Chinese-Americans use the WeChat app to discuss U.S. politics, which Trump of course has threatened to destroy:

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue

Turnout among Asian Americans in Georgia was way up in the 2020 presidential election, meaning the Democratic-leaning demographic contributed to Biden’s win in the state. Chinese-American activists are now mobilizing again ahead of the January Senate runoffs.

In 2016, BiLan Liao moved from Kentucky to Gwinnett County, just northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Having voted for Hillary Clinton that year, the 62-year-old Chinese immigrant, who came to the U.S. in 1999, was deeply worried about the “authoritarian style” of leadership that Trump has presented, which reminded her of the repressive ruling party in China. As the 2020 election rolled around, Liao ... thought it necessary to engage in politics to protect her freedom and vision for democracy.

62% of Asian-American Georgian voters surveyed chose Biden, and 36% chose Trump. And an analysis by the Democratic firm TargetSmart indicated that Asian-American voter turnout in the state nearly doubled compared with that of the 2016 election, even as a New York Times analysis showed that the black share of the electorate declined ....

During Trump’s presidency, Liao started a habit of trying to counter right-wing narratives on WeChat, the Chinese social media app that has over 3 million active users in the U.S., most of whom are Chinese Americans. She was so vocal ... that she was kicked out of all the conservative Chinese WeChat groups of which she had been a part. Liao ... coordinated with a few other liberal contacts on WeChat to organize volunteer meetings....

Yu Xiao, a Chinese immigrant who has lived in Atlanta since 1997, has been active in Georgia’s political scene since 2013. He explained that many liberal-leaning Chinese-American voters were reluctant to campaign publicly for Biden due to the overwhelmingly conservative political environment in Georgia....

As a longtime registered Republican, Xiao didn’t vote for Trump in either the 2016 or the 2020 election. “I know the greatness of the American democratic system,” Xiao said. “But I’ve also come to know that it’s fragile, that it can’t be guaranteed to choose the best president. It’s up to us to defend and maintain it....

Now, having witnessed the considerable change they have made in the presidential election, progressive Chinese Georgians have readied themselves for another round of campaigning, to elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock into the U.S. Senate.

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue - SupChina
 
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Chinese social media users react to Biden’s presidential win

On the Chinese Internet popular discussion of the American election was rather open, with 12 billion hits on Weibo’s main hashtag, #“American election” ( #美国大选 měiguó dàxuǎn) # by November 9th. The average Chinese internet user has a reasonably clear view of the American elections and what was at stake in them. Here is a summary from SupChina, a popular China-specializing non-profit English news source critical of the CCP:

While most comments were celebratory, some people soberly reminded others that a peaceful transition of power was unlikely to happen, especially given Trump’s “desperate” attempts to paint the voting process as fraudulent. “The win was easy. Now, the real challenge: How to kick Trump out of the White House?” a Weibo user said, while another wrote, “Trump should learn how to accept defeat like a real grown-up. This only gets more embarrassing for him the longer he throws a temper tantrum.”

Not everyone was delighted at Trump’s defeat, though. On Weibo, a number of commenters confessed that while they hated Trump’s anti-Chinese rhetoric and erratic behavior, his presidency was entertaining to witness, and that they would miss all the memes and jokes inspired by him. “Trump running America is the only reality show that I’ve followed closely. It pains me to say goodbye to it,” wrote an Internet user. “Trump lost his presidency. We lost a great comedian,” another one said.

Under his four-year tenure in the White House, Trump has blown hot and cold on China, calling Xí Jìnpíng 习近平 a “great leader” and hyping a trade deal at some times, and at other times casting Beijing as America’s main adversary, responsible for the disappearance of manufacturing jobs and then a “Chinese plague.” In the wake of Biden’s win, a number of Chinese people hoped that the President-elect would bring U.S.-China relations onto a more stable track — and ideally, heighten prospects for cooperation.

The optimism, however, wasn’t felt by everyone. Some skeptics raised the question as to whether a Biden White House would see China more as a partner than a threat. “It really doesn’t matter who’s the next U.S. president. China and the U.S. are destined to be strategic rivals,” a Weibo user wrote. “The only thing under our control ultimately is our determination to make China stronger.”

https://supchina.com/2020/11/06 — may be pay-walled or archived

Here is another SupChina feature, this one on Chinese-Americans who played a role in helping Biden win Georgia. I note that Chinese and Asian-American voters typically have been very hesitant to involve themselves in heated American politics. Ironically many conservative anti-communist Chinese-Americans used the WeChat app to discuss U.S. politics, which Trump of course has threatened to destroy:

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue

Turnout among Asian Americans in Georgia was way up in the 2020 presidential election, meaning the Democratic-leaning demographic contributed to Biden’s win in the state. Chinese-American activists are now mobilizing again ahead of the January Senate runoffs.

In 2016, BiLan Liao moved from Kentucky to Gwinnett County, just northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Having voted for Hillary Clinton that year, the 62-year-old Chinese immigrant, who came to the U.S. in 1999, was deeply worried about the “authoritarian style” of leadership that Trump has presented, which reminded her of the repressive ruling party in China. As the 2020 election rolled around, Liao ... thought it necessary to engage in politics to protect her freedom and vision for democracy.

62% of Asian-American Georgian voters surveyed chose Biden, and 36% chose Trump. And an analysis by the Democratic firm TargetSmart indicated that Asian-American voter turnout in the state nearly doubled compared with that of the 2016 election, even as a New York Times analysis showed that the black share of the electorate declined ....

During Trump’s presidency, Liao started a habit of trying to counter right-wing narratives on WeChat, the Chinese social media app that has over 3 million active users in the U.S., most of whom are Chinese Americans. She was so vocal ... that she was kicked out of all the conservative Chinese WeChat groups of which she had been a part.
Liao ... coordinated with a few other liberal contacts on WeChat to organize volunteer meetings....

Yu Xiao, a Chinese immigrant who has lived in Atlanta since 1997, has been active in Georgia’s political scene since 2013. He explained that many liberal-leaning Chinese-American voters were reluctant to campaign publicly for Biden due to the overwhelmingly conservative political environment in Georgia....

As a longtime registered Republican, Xiao didn’t vote for Trump in either the 2016 or the 2020 election. “I know the greatness of the American democratic system,” Xiao said. “But I’ve also come to know that it’s fragile, that it can’t be guaranteed to choose the best president. It’s up to us to defend and maintain it....

Now, having witnessed the considerable change they have made in the presidential election, progressive Chinese Georgians have readied themselves for another round of campaigning, to elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock into the U.S. Senate.

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue - SupChina
Chinese-Americans my ass. Xi could not be happier with the oldest and most senile pajama boy in the world probably becoming president.
 

Unkotare

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Perhaps stirring feelings of longing for the chance of national elections at all in China.
 

TheParser

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Chinese social media users react to Biden’s presidential win

On the Chinese Internet popular discussion of the American election was rather open, with 12 billion hits on Weibo’s main hashtag, #“American election” ( #美国大选 měiguó dàxuǎn) # by November 9th. The average Chinese internet user has a reasonably clear view of the American elections and what was at stake in them. Here is a summary from SupChina, a popular China-specializing non-profit English news source critical of the CCP:

While most comments were celebratory, some people soberly reminded others that a peaceful transition of power was unlikely to happen, especially given Trump’s “desperate” attempts to paint the voting process as fraudulent. “The win was easy. Now, the real challenge: How to kick Trump out of the White House?” a Weibo user said, while another wrote, “Trump should learn how to accept defeat like a real grown-up. This only gets more embarrassing for him the longer he throws a temper tantrum.”

Not everyone was delighted at Trump’s defeat, though. On Weibo, a number of commenters confessed that while they hated Trump’s anti-Chinese rhetoric and erratic behavior, his presidency was entertaining to witness, and that they would miss all the memes and jokes inspired by him. “Trump running America is the only reality show that I’ve followed closely. It pains me to say goodbye to it,” wrote an Internet user. “Trump lost his presidency. We lost a great comedian,” another one said.

Under his four-year tenure in the White House, Trump has blown hot and cold on China, calling Xí Jìnpíng 习近平 a “great leader” and hyping a trade deal at some times, and at other times casting Beijing as America’s main adversary, responsible for the disappearance of manufacturing jobs and then a “Chinese plague.” In the wake of Biden’s win, a number of Chinese people hoped that the President-elect would bring U.S.-China relations onto a more stable track — and ideally, heighten prospects for cooperation.

The optimism, however, wasn’t felt by everyone. Some skeptics raised the question as to whether a Biden White House would see China more as a partner than a threat. “It really doesn’t matter who’s the next U.S. president. China and the U.S. are destined to be strategic rivals,” a Weibo user wrote. “The only thing under our control ultimately is our determination to make China stronger.”

November 7, 2020 - SupChina — may be pay-walled or archived

Here is another SupChina feature, this one on Chinese-Americans who played a role in helping Biden win Georgia. I note that Chinese and Asian-American voters typically have been very hesitant to involve themselves in heated American politics. Ironically many conservative anti-communist Chinese-Americans used the WeChat app to discuss U.S. politics, which Trump of course has threatened to destroy:

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue

Turnout among Asian Americans in Georgia was way up in the 2020 presidential election, meaning the Democratic-leaning demographic contributed to Biden’s win in the state. Chinese-American activists are now mobilizing again ahead of the January Senate runoffs.

In 2016, BiLan Liao moved from Kentucky to Gwinnett County, just northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Having voted for Hillary Clinton that year, the 62-year-old Chinese immigrant, who came to the U.S. in 1999, was deeply worried about the “authoritarian style” of leadership that Trump has presented, which reminded her of the repressive ruling party in China. As the 2020 election rolled around, Liao ... thought it necessary to engage in politics to protect her freedom and vision for democracy.

62% of Asian-American Georgian voters surveyed chose Biden, and 36% chose Trump. And an analysis by the Democratic firm TargetSmart indicated that Asian-American voter turnout in the state nearly doubled compared with that of the 2016 election, even as a New York Times analysis showed that the black share of the electorate declined ....

During Trump’s presidency, Liao started a habit of trying to counter right-wing narratives on WeChat, the Chinese social media app that has over 3 million active users in the U.S., most of whom are Chinese Americans. She was so vocal ... that she was kicked out of all the conservative Chinese WeChat groups of which she had been a part.
Liao ... coordinated with a few other liberal contacts on WeChat to organize volunteer meetings....

Yu Xiao, a Chinese immigrant who has lived in Atlanta since 1997, has been active in Georgia’s political scene since 2013. He explained that many liberal-leaning Chinese-American voters were reluctant to campaign publicly for Biden due to the overwhelmingly conservative political environment in Georgia....

As a longtime registered Republican, Xiao didn’t vote for Trump in either the 2016 or the 2020 election. “I know the greatness of the American democratic system,” Xiao said. “But I’ve also come to know that it’s fragile, that it can’t be guaranteed to choose the best president. It’s up to us to defend and maintain it....

Now, having witnessed the considerable change they have made in the presidential election, progressive Chinese Georgians have readied themselves for another round of campaigning, to elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock into the U.S. Senate.

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue - SupChina
If it is true that most Chinese Americans in Georgia voted for Mr. Biden, that is very sad, indeed.

I hope that they will remember that if they are ever the victims of BLM violence against their businesses or persons.
 

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Chinese social media users react to Biden’s presidential win

On the Chinese Internet popular discussion of the American election was rather open, with 12 billion hits on Weibo’s main hashtag, #“American election” ( #美国大选 měiguó dàxuǎn) # by November 9th. The average Chinese internet user has a reasonably clear view of the American elections and what was at stake in them. Here is a summary from SupChina, a popular China-specializing non-profit English news source critical of the CCP:

While most comments were celebratory, some people soberly reminded others that a peaceful transition of power was unlikely to happen, especially given Trump’s “desperate” attempts to paint the voting process as fraudulent. “The win was easy. Now, the real challenge: How to kick Trump out of the White House?” a Weibo user said, while another wrote, “Trump should learn how to accept defeat like a real grown-up. This only gets more embarrassing for him the longer he throws a temper tantrum.”

Not everyone was delighted at Trump’s defeat, though. On Weibo, a number of commenters confessed that while they hated Trump’s anti-Chinese rhetoric and erratic behavior, his presidency was entertaining to witness, and that they would miss all the memes and jokes inspired by him. “Trump running America is the only reality show that I’ve followed closely. It pains me to say goodbye to it,” wrote an Internet user. “Trump lost his presidency. We lost a great comedian,” another one said.

Under his four-year tenure in the White House, Trump has blown hot and cold on China, calling Xí Jìnpíng 习近平 a “great leader” and hyping a trade deal at some times, and at other times casting Beijing as America’s main adversary, responsible for the disappearance of manufacturing jobs and then a “Chinese plague.” In the wake of Biden’s win, a number of Chinese people hoped that the President-elect would bring U.S.-China relations onto a more stable track — and ideally, heighten prospects for cooperation.

The optimism, however, wasn’t felt by everyone. Some skeptics raised the question as to whether a Biden White House would see China more as a partner than a threat. “It really doesn’t matter who’s the next U.S. president. China and the U.S. are destined to be strategic rivals,” a Weibo user wrote. “The only thing under our control ultimately is our determination to make China stronger.”

November 7, 2020 - SupChina — may be pay-walled or archived

Here is another SupChina feature, this one on Chinese-Americans who played a role in helping Biden win Georgia. I note that Chinese and Asian-American voters typically have been very hesitant to involve themselves in heated American politics. Ironically many conservative anti-communist Chinese-Americans used the WeChat app to discuss U.S. politics, which Trump of course has threatened to destroy:

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue

Turnout among Asian Americans in Georgia was way up in the 2020 presidential election, meaning the Democratic-leaning demographic contributed to Biden’s win in the state. Chinese-American activists are now mobilizing again ahead of the January Senate runoffs.

In 2016, BiLan Liao moved from Kentucky to Gwinnett County, just northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Having voted for Hillary Clinton that year, the 62-year-old Chinese immigrant, who came to the U.S. in 1999, was deeply worried about the “authoritarian style” of leadership that Trump has presented, which reminded her of the repressive ruling party in China. As the 2020 election rolled around, Liao ... thought it necessary to engage in politics to protect her freedom and vision for democracy.

62% of Asian-American Georgian voters surveyed chose Biden, and 36% chose Trump. And an analysis by the Democratic firm TargetSmart indicated that Asian-American voter turnout in the state nearly doubled compared with that of the 2016 election, even as a New York Times analysis showed that the black share of the electorate declined ....

During Trump’s presidency, Liao started a habit of trying to counter right-wing narratives on WeChat, the Chinese social media app that has over 3 million active users in the U.S., most of whom are Chinese Americans. She was so vocal ... that she was kicked out of all the conservative Chinese WeChat groups of which she had been a part.
Liao ... coordinated with a few other liberal contacts on WeChat to organize volunteer meetings....

Yu Xiao, a Chinese immigrant who has lived in Atlanta since 1997, has been active in Georgia’s political scene since 2013. He explained that many liberal-leaning Chinese-American voters were reluctant to campaign publicly for Biden due to the overwhelmingly conservative political environment in Georgia....

As a longtime registered Republican, Xiao didn’t vote for Trump in either the 2016 or the 2020 election. “I know the greatness of the American democratic system,” Xiao said. “But I’ve also come to know that it’s fragile, that it can’t be guaranteed to choose the best president. It’s up to us to defend and maintain it....

Now, having witnessed the considerable change they have made in the presidential election, progressive Chinese Georgians have readied themselves for another round of campaigning, to elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock into the U.S. Senate.

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue - SupChina

A court battle is not normally considered violence.


You know what is considered violence? Violence.


1606686283486.png
 

jackflash

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To each his own. One has to sleep in the bed they make like no doubt about that one for sure.
 

Gdjjr

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Nothing will change for the Chinese people- rhetoric is a tool for manipulation-
 
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Tom Paine 1949

Tom Paine 1949

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Perhaps stirring feelings of longing for the chance of national elections at all in China.
Good point. Chinese mainland internet users of course are not allowed to advocate for multi-party elections in their own country. On the other hand anecdotal but rather persuasive evidence indicates they are not especially enamored of the U.S. electoral two-party system these days either, nor of the quality of candidates it produces. Even many who respect and admire the U.S. system tend to think it is simply not suitable for them, at least not now.
 

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Perhaps stirring feelings of longing for the chance of national elections at all in China.
Good point. Chinese mainland internet users of course are not allowed to advocate for multi-party elections in their own country. On the other hand anecdotal but rather persuasive evidence indicates they are not especially enamored of the U.S. electoral two-party system these days either, nor of the quality of candidates it produces. Even many who respect and admire the U.S. system tend to think it is simply not suitable for them, at least not now.
No system will survive betrayal by the political class as a whole.
 

Polishprince

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On the Chinese Internet popular discussion of the American election was rather open, with 12 billion hits on Weibo’s main hashtag, #“American election” ( #美国大选 měiguó dàxuǎn) # as of 3 weeks ago. Chinese internet users have a reasonably clear view of what was at stake in the American election. Here is a summary from SupChina (11/9), an important China-specializing non-profit English news source critical of the CCP:

Chinese social media users react to Biden’s presidential win

While most comments were celebratory, some people soberly reminded others that a peaceful transition of power was unlikely to happen, especially given Trump’s “desperate” attempts to paint the voting process as fraudulent. “The win was easy. Now, the real challenge: How to kick Trump out of the White House?” a Weibo user said, while another wrote, “Trump should learn how to accept defeat like a real grown-up. This only gets more embarrassing for him the longer he throws a temper tantrum.”

Not everyone was delighted at Trump’s defeat, though. On Weibo, a number of commenters confessed that while they hated Trump’s anti-Chinese rhetoric and erratic behavior, his presidency was entertaining to witness, and that they would miss all the memes and jokes inspired by him. “Trump running America is the only reality show that I’ve followed closely. It pains me to say goodbye to it,” wrote an Internet user. “Trump lost his presidency. We lost a great comedian,” another one said.

Under his four-year tenure in the White House, Trump has blown hot and cold on China, calling Xí Jìnpíng 习近平 a “great leader” and hyping a trade deal at some times, and at other times casting Beijing as America’s main adversary, responsible for the disappearance of manufacturing jobs and then a “Chinese plague.” In the wake of Biden’s win, a number of Chinese people hoped that the President-elect would bring U.S.-China relations onto a more stable track — and ideally, heighten prospects for cooperation.

The optimism, however, wasn’t felt by everyone. Some skeptics raised the question as to whether a Biden White House would see China more as a partner than a threat. “It really doesn’t matter who’s the next U.S. president. China and the U.S. are destined to be strategic rivals,” a Weibo user wrote. “The only thing under our control ultimately is our determination to make China stronger.”


Here is another SupChina feature, this one on Chinese-Americans who played a role in helping Biden win Georgia. I note that Chinese and Asian-American voters typically have been very hesitant to involve themselves in heated American politics. Ironically, many conservative anti-communist Chinese-Americans use the WeChat app to discuss U.S. politics, which Trump of course has threatened to destroy:

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue

Turnout among Asian Americans in Georgia was way up in the 2020 presidential election, meaning the Democratic-leaning demographic contributed to Biden’s win in the state. Chinese-American activists are now mobilizing again ahead of the January Senate runoffs.

In 2016, BiLan Liao moved from Kentucky to Gwinnett County, just northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. Having voted for Hillary Clinton that year, the 62-year-old Chinese immigrant, who came to the U.S. in 1999, was deeply worried about the “authoritarian style” of leadership that Trump has presented, which reminded her of the repressive ruling party in China. As the 2020 election rolled around, Liao ... thought it necessary to engage in politics to protect her freedom and vision for democracy.

62% of Asian-American Georgian voters surveyed chose Biden, and 36% chose Trump. And an analysis by the Democratic firm TargetSmart indicated that Asian-American voter turnout in the state nearly doubled compared with that of the 2016 election, even as a New York Times analysis showed that the black share of the electorate declined ....

During Trump’s presidency, Liao started a habit of trying to counter right-wing narratives on WeChat, the Chinese social media app that has over 3 million active users in the U.S., most of whom are Chinese Americans. She was so vocal ... that she was kicked out of all the conservative Chinese WeChat groups of which she had been a part. Liao ... coordinated with a few other liberal contacts on WeChat to organize volunteer meetings....

Yu Xiao, a Chinese immigrant who has lived in Atlanta since 1997, has been active in Georgia’s political scene since 2013. He explained that many liberal-leaning Chinese-American voters were reluctant to campaign publicly for Biden due to the overwhelmingly conservative political environment in Georgia....

As a longtime registered Republican, Xiao didn’t vote for Trump in either the 2016 or the 2020 election. “I know the greatness of the American democratic system,” Xiao said. “But I’ve also come to know that it’s fragile, that it can’t be guaranteed to choose the best president. It’s up to us to defend and maintain it....

Now, having witnessed the considerable change they have made in the presidential election, progressive Chinese Georgians have readied themselves for another round of campaigning, to elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock into the U.S. Senate.

How Chinese-American activism helped Georgia turn blue - SupChina


The opinion of Chairman Xi is the only opinion that matters in Red China.

And of course, he is pleased that a doddering old man who owes him big time (for the checks he sent to Hunter) is likely going to be ascending as our autocrat.
 

justinacolmena

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“The win was easy. Now, the real challenge: How to kick Trump out of the White House?” a Weibo user said, while another wrote, “Trump should learn how to accept defeat like a real grown-up. This only gets more embarrassing for him the longer he throws a temper tantrum.”
So Chinese users of Weibo and TikTok subscribe to the theory that the election is "called" by the fourth-estate establishment mainstream media press owned by Michael Bloomberg, Thomas Steyer, and George Soros, and even Rupert Murdoch and Warren Buffett. The Chinese Communists have unwavering faith in the absolute power of these ultra-wealthy liberal political Jewish tycoons as the dictators of the American proletariat.
 
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Tom Paine 1949

Tom Paine 1949

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To be clear, U.S. WeChat discussion board content is not at all censored by China and now is dominated by conservative right-wing elements. Wild stories spread by Trump supporters and Epoch Times types are rampant, and there are usually no Chinese language “info checkers” available at all. A recent Axios China report gave details on some disturbing trends in this community:

“In the weeks before the U.S. presidential election, three prominent Chinese activists in the U.S. found their homes surrounded by anonymous protesters who accused them of spying for the Chinese Communist Party ... The three activists, who had fled China due to repression from Chinese authorities, now face physical threats on U.S. soil. The protesters appeared to be supporters of an anti-CCP movement led by Guo Wengui and former White House adviser Steve Bannon. The trouble began in September, when Guo, a Chinese billionaire living in exile in the U.S. who has developed a large following, made a video denouncing a long list of well-known Chinese dissidents as supposed CCP spies..”

Guo Wengui Is Sending Mobs After Chinese Dissidents

Guo used to work closely with a powerful Mainland Chinese Security chief (since purged by XiJinping). He has been working closely with Bannon but is also widely suspected of being a Chinese double spy attacking Chinese dissidents.

Another recent (pay-walled) Axios report entitled “America's Chinese communities struggle with online disinformation” showed how attempts were made to scare Chinese Americans away from voting by spreading rumors that marshal law was about to be imposed.

 
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