The Pathology of the Rich: Disposable Citizens

georgephillip

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
 

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
Chris needs to join the SEALS...or die trying.
 

Jackson

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
The ultra rich can continue to have their snobbish disdain for the poor as long they continue with their philanthropy and creating the millions of jobs for the middleclass. The position of their nose is no business of mine.
 
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georgephillip

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The rich enable me.
In which sense?

"en·a·ble
enˈābəl/Submit
verb
1.
give (someone or something) the authority or means to do something.
"the evidence would enable us to arrive at firm conclusions"
synonyms: allow, permit, let, give the means, equip, empower, make able, fit; More
antonyms: prevent
make possible.
"a number of courses are available to enable an understanding of a broad range of issues"
2.
COMPUTING
make (a device or system) operational; activate."

https://www.google.com/search?q=enable&oq=enable&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i65j0l4.5155j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8
 
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georgephillip

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
Chris needs to join the SEALS...or die trying.
SEALS need to do more reading and less dying (for the Rich)

"Hedges’ is the author of the 2002 best seller, War is A Force That Gives Us Meaning, which is an examination of what war does to individuals and societies. He states that war is the pornography of violence, a powerful narcotic that '…has a dark beauty, filled with the monstrous and the grotesque.'

"He goes on to explain, 'War gives us a distorted sense of self. It gives us meaning. It creates a feeling of comradeship that obliterates our alienation and makes us feel, for perhaps the first time in our lives, that we belong.'

"Of his own experience of war, living and working as a journalist in the war zones of Central America, the Balkans and the Middle East, he writes: 'I have seen too much of violent death. I have tasted too much of my own fear. I have painful memories that lie buried and untouched most of the time. It is never easy when they surface.'”

Chris Hedges | Americans Who Tell The Truth
 

tinydancer

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
Once upon a time there was a man called Joseph Kennedy Senior. A flawed man. A sinful man.

But he gave America gifts in two of his sons.

One was a good child who loved his land and wanted every one to succeed.

One child was torn between his two brothers. But had great promise. Sadly he could not fulfill his destiny.

The son left could never fill the shoes of his older brothers He became a liberal. And gave America a legacy of hell.
 
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georgephillip

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
The ultra rich can continue to have their snobbish disdain for the poor as long they continue with their philanthropy and creating the millions of jobs for the middleclass. The position of their nose is no business of mine.
Middle class demand creates jobs, something the ultra rich find more profitable for them to create in places like Brazil and China and India.
 

OODA_Loop

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Middle class demand creates jobs, something the ultra rich find more profitable for them to create in places like Brazil and China and India.
Middle class works for rich or government who tax the rich.

chicken - egg
 

Jackson

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
The ultra rich can continue to have their snobbish disdain for the poor as long they continue with their philanthropy and creating the millions of jobs for the middleclass. The position of their nose is no business of mine.
Middle class demand creates jobs, something the ultra rich find more profitable for them to create in places like Brazil and China and India.
There is truth to that, George. But to carry that discussion further, we would have to talk about unions and how they initially drove the manufacturing base to other countries.
 

editec

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Its NOT THE RICH who are screwing over us and our nation.

It is a very select group of people (some very wealthy, of course,) and their TOOLS in GOVERNMENT who are responsible for our current state of affairs.

A curse on the leaders of OWS for turning what should have been public examination of the specific crimes of SELECT GROUP OF BANKSTERS into a CLASS WAR against the "1%".
 
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georgephillip

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
Once upon a time there was a man called Joseph Kennedy Senior. A flawed man. A sinful man.

But he gave America gifts in two of his sons.

One was a good child who loved his land and wanted every one to succeed.

One child was torn between his two brothers. But had great promise. Sadly he could not fulfill his destiny.

The son left could never fill the shoes of his older brothers He became a liberal. And gave America a legacy of hell.
Karl Marx wrote "(t)he ruling ideas are nothing more than the ideal expression of the dominant material relationships..." do you think it's likely the Kennedy family embraced that notion any less than the Bush family did?

"The fact is, if you're poor, you only get one chance. If you're wealthy like Bush, you get chance after chance after chance after chance. So you're a C student at Andover, and you go to Yale, and you go to Harvard Business School, and you're AWOL from your National Guard unit, and you're a cokehead, and it doesn't really matter. You don't even really have a job till you're 40 and you become president of the United States."

The Pathology of the Rich - Chris Hedges on Reality Asserts Itself pt1
 

tinydancer

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.


"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
When I was poor (and I was from a good family of means but struck out on my own because that was expected of me) I had two very wealthy and powerful women blessedly come into my life.

They never looked down on me.

Unless you're a canuck you won't know one. A Ridgepath. Maybe some of you will know the other. Sylvia Tyson.

Neither ever treated me like I was a slave or a servant as we worked together. And they both brought me into their worlds. And they raised me up. Both and we are talking richie rich here women made me not only equal but surpassing themselves. And they loved it.

I'm getting sick of these stories of "rich" being cruel and horrendous to others.


"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.


I am glad for the OP.

I'm going to spend the rest of the weekend finding out every thing I can about this asshole (Chris Hedges) because I can truly say I never met in all my travels and life journeys a wealthy person that was cruel and unkind.

I've just not met them.
 
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georgephillip

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Middle class demand creates jobs, something the ultra rich find more profitable for them to create in places like Brazil and China and India.
Middle class works for rich or government who tax the rich.

chicken - egg
The middle class also supplies many small business jobs in the US, and they are also being squeezed into extinction by the ultra rich and their handmaidens in government.
 
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georgephillip

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The ultra rich can continue to have their snobbish disdain for the poor as long they continue with their philanthropy and creating the millions of jobs for the middleclass. The position of their nose is no business of mine.
Middle class demand creates jobs, something the ultra rich find more profitable for them to create in places like Brazil and China and India.
There is truth to that, George. But to carry that discussion further, we would have to talk about unions and how they initially drove the manufacturing base to other countries.
I'm willing to concede how rich corrupt union management sold out US workers during the Cold War, but when we discuss other countries we should also consider German labor unions which had voting members sitting on the boards of directors of the corporations they worked for. When ultra-rich Germans suggested moving "their" factories to China, German Democracy said "No!"
 

tinydancer

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"'The rich are different from us,' F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, 'Yes, they have more money.'”

"The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway.

"The rich are different.

"The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in 'The Great Gatsby' and his short story 'The Rich Boy,' a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

"Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear.

"Once oligarchs achieve unchecked economic and political power, as they have in the United States, the citizens too become disposable."

Like Fitzgerald, Chris Hedges spent his early years among the rich and famous. At age 10 Chris earned a scholarship to an exclusive New England boarding school, and he spent some of his vacation time in the homes of his classmates:

"I spent time in the homes of the ultra-rich and powerful, watching my classmates, who were children, callously order around men and women who worked as their chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and servants.

"When the sons and daughters of the rich get into serious trouble there are always lawyers, publicists and political personages to protect them—George W. Bush’s life is a case study in the insidious affirmative action for the rich.

"The rich have a snobbish disdain for the poor—despite well-publicized acts of philanthropy—and the middle class.

"These lower classes are viewed as uncouth parasites, annoyances that have to be endured, at times placated and always controlled in the quest to amass more power and money."

Chris Hedges: Let?s Get This Class War Started - Chris Hedges - Truthdig

"The inability to grasp the pathology of our oligarchic rulers is one of our gravest faults."
Once upon a time there was a man called Joseph Kennedy Senior. A flawed man. A sinful man.

But he gave America gifts in two of his sons.

One was a good child who loved his land and wanted every one to succeed.

One child was torn between his two brothers. But had great promise. Sadly he could not fulfill his destiny.

The son left could never fill the shoes of his older brothers He became a liberal. And gave America a legacy of hell.
Karl Marx wrote "(t)he ruling ideas are nothing more than the ideal expression of the dominant material relationships..." do you think it's likely the Kennedy family embraced that notion any less than the Bush family did?

"The fact is, if you're poor, you only get one chance. If you're wealthy like Bush, you get chance after chance after chance after chance. So you're a C student at Andover, and you go to Yale, and you go to Harvard Business School, and you're AWOL from your National Guard unit, and you're a cokehead, and it doesn't really matter. You don't even really have a job till you're 40 and you become president of the United States."

The Pathology of the Rich - Chris Hedges on Reality Asserts Itself pt1
"The fact is, if you're poor, you only get one chance

Bullshit. Big time bullshit.

I've had so many lives. I'm like Lazarus or Freddie.:lol: I keep coming back. That's my nature. And my nature is to be a winner at whatever I do.

It's called spirit. And wanting to be the best you can be. Now I hit the top. That's me.I rocked.

So do others.

Someone though might be out there tonight being a good waitress, just doing her job but being extra special nice to the poor mom with three kids coming home from dad's place.

With all the kids saying "Daddy gives us this".

And the waitress without adding it to the bill gives all the kids and the mom the pumpkin pie saying "you won today; you're our winner".

You see? You never just get one chance. Every minute you breathe is a new chance. Every day is a new chance.

This is the difference between a progressive than me. I keep breathing. And I believe in tomorrow.

Why? Because it's a new chance.
 
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