More than 90 million ballots cast as of Saturday

EvilEyeFleegle

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.
 
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kyzr

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Votes count no matter how or when they are cast. The Covid-19 pandemic probably made people apply for mail-in ballots way more than usual. I'm betting that when the pandemic wanes so will mail-ins.
I don't believe that mail-ins favor either candidate.
That said, his looks like a record breaking election for voter turnout.
 
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EvilEyeFleegle

EvilEyeFleegle

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Votes count no matter how or when they are cast. The Covid-19 pandemic probably made people apply for mail-in ballots way more than usual. I'm betting that when the pandemic wanes so will mail-ins.
I don't believe that mail-ins favor either candidate.
That said, his looks like a record breaking election for voter turnout.
That pleases me. Whatever the result..a huge turnout means a better sense of what the will of the people really is. Also..aside from the Presidential race..all the down-ballot issues..the ones that are probably more impactful on people's lives..will get a lot more attention also!
 

toobfreak

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.

That either means that there are only about 40 million going to vote on the actual election day or a whole HECK of a lot of extra people are coming out of the woodwork to ensure a Trump reelection and to make sure Joe Biden never again seeing the inside of the White House! Or at least that Harris NEVER sees it.
 
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EvilEyeFleegle

EvilEyeFleegle

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.

That either means that there are only about 40 million going to vote on the actual election day or a whole HECK of a lot of extra people are coming out of the woodwork to ensure a Trump reelection and to make sure Joe Biden never again seeing the inside of the White House! Or at least that Harris NEVER sees it.
It could mean that...or it could mean a landslide of epic proportions, as the Dems do what the R's have long feared..used their sizable numerical advantage decisively.

It could mean that a lot of Republicans sit this one out...if that's the case--could be a generational turning point.

We'll see...
 

j-mac

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.

That either means that there are only about 40 million going to vote on the actual election day or a whole HECK of a lot of extra people are coming out of the woodwork to ensure a Trump reelection and to make sure Joe Biden never again seeing the inside of the White House! Or at least that Harris NEVER sees it.
It could mean that...or it could mean a landslide of epic proportions, as the Dems do what the R's have long feared..used their sizable numerical advantage decisively.

It could mean that a lot of Republicans sit this one out...if that's the case--could be a generational turning point.

We'll see...
Or it could be that Democrats are the ones sitting it out, and the early votes we see are in epic proportions for Trump, at which point we will know on election night....
 

WillHaftawaite

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We're going to be lucky to know the winner by Thanksgiving.
 

BasicHumanUnit

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.

That either means that there are only about 40 million going to vote on the actual election day or a whole HECK of a lot of extra people are coming out of the woodwork to ensure a Trump reelection and to make sure Joe Biden never again seeing the inside of the White House! Or at least that Harris NEVER sees it.
It could mean that...or it could mean a landslide of epic proportions, as the Dems do what the R's have long feared..used their sizable numerical advantage decisively.

It could mean that a lot of Republicans sit this one out...if that's the case--could be a generational turning point.

We'll see...
There is absolutely nothing (outside of downright criminal activity) that points to anything other than a Trump landslide.

Place your bets.
 

22lcidw

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.

That either means that there are only about 40 million going to vote on the actual election day or a whole HECK of a lot of extra people are coming out of the woodwork to ensure a Trump reelection and to make sure Joe Biden never again seeing the inside of the White House! Or at least that Harris NEVER sees it.
It could mean that...or it could mean a landslide of epic proportions, as the Dems do what the R's have long feared..used their sizable numerical advantage decisively.

It could mean that a lot of Republicans sit this one out...if that's the case--could be a generational turning point.

We'll see...
Turn on zee ovenz evil eye fleegle...turn on zee ovenz! ..."I vill...I vill"! The evil agenda goes in motion like a huge ocean wave. Difficult to stop it when in motion. It will have to complete it journey to the sands of the beach.
 
OP
EvilEyeFleegle

EvilEyeFleegle

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The left KNEW the turnout would be dismal....thus sending out millions of ballots.

It was a move of desperation....if not criminal intent.....from the beginning.
And now...millions of voters are returning those ballots...to be counted. How criminal..the state facilitated voting for its citizens.

I applaud your blind optimism--
 
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EvilEyeFleegle

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While the country approach boiling point...the election is already more than half over---all the shit tossing in an attempt to influence..who..exactly?


At least 90 million Americans have already cast their ballots for the general election with three days left until Election Day, a historic early turnout that underscores voters’ intense desire to be heard in a divisive election despite the voting challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
The massive early turnout is roughly 65 percent of the 139 million votes cast in 2016, and it essentially guarantees that, for the first time in history, a majority of ballots will be cast before Election Day. The early turnout puts the country on pace for record voter participation not seen in more than a century, and if the current rate holds, more than 100 million ballots will have been cast before Tuesday.
Democrats have had an edge in early voting, but that gap has narrowed in some key battleground states in recent days, including in Florida, North Carolina and Georgia, according to data maintained by the U.S. Elections Project, a nonpartisan early-voting tracker. President Trump has urged his voters to cast their ballots on Election Day, and his campaign is hoping that his supporters take heed and show up in full force to close that gap.


The record-breaking turnout has stunned election officials and campaign operatives alike, and it has upended the presidential campaigns’ expectations of which states would be pivotal to their path to victory. Texas, for example, has led the country in early voting and has already surpassed its 2016 turnout; the number of ballots cast there so far has made the state competitive for the first time in decades.
As the early-voting period comes to an end in most states Monday, some voters have taken extraordinary measures to make sure they can cast their ballots early, including waiting hours in line and traveling across the country to avoid problems with mail delivery. Their overwhelming demand to vote early comes despite the president’s attacks on the integrity of mail voting, and as spikes in positive coronavirus cases have exacerbated voters’ anxiety about potential exposure at busy polling places Tuesday.

“Obviously, this race is far from decided. But to the extent that President Trump is entering Election Day with a deficit, the degree of difficulty that he’s facing to surmount that deficit is substantially higher because of his tactical rejection of early voting,” said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm.

At least 90,488,149 Americans had voted as of Saturday afternoon, including at least 32.9 million who cast votes in person, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by Michael McDonald, a political scientist at the University of Florida. In the 20 states where party registration data was available, 45.9 percent were Democrats, 30.2 percent were Republicans and 23.3 percent had no party affiliation, according to the tracker.
Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.

And voters under 30 have exceeded their 2016 early-voting rates in the majority of battleground states, amid signs that they may be on track to massively turn out as they did in the 2018 midterms, when they more than doubled their rate of voting compared with the prior midterm election.

That either means that there are only about 40 million going to vote on the actual election day or a whole HECK of a lot of extra people are coming out of the woodwork to ensure a Trump reelection and to make sure Joe Biden never again seeing the inside of the White House! Or at least that Harris NEVER sees it.
It could mean that...or it could mean a landslide of epic proportions, as the Dems do what the R's have long feared..used their sizable numerical advantage decisively.

It could mean that a lot of Republicans sit this one out...if that's the case--could be a generational turning point.

We'll see...
Turn on zee ovenz evil eye fleegle...turn on zee ovenz! ..."I vill...I vill"! The evil agenda goes in motion like a huge ocean wave. Difficult to stop it when in motion. It will have to complete it journey to the sands of the beach.
It's called voting.

Evil agenda..LOL! Sometimes I wish our leaders had any agenda at all...other than eating at the public trough!

Tempus Fugit
 

Dogbiscuit

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Nearly 28 percent of the early ballots nationally were cast by voters who did not participate in the 2016 election, according to a TargetSmart analysis.
Black voters have turned out in large numbers nationally and in some key battleground states, such as Georgia and North Carolina.
These two statements are important, imo.
 

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