Max death 737: FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues

Denizen

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Boeing is guilty of culpable homicide in the death of 346 people. Boeing was aware of pilot reports of dangerous flight characteristics of the 737 Max in 2016 and concealed the information.

Boeing management is scoundrels. They were very quick to pronounce the Indonesian 737 Max crash as pilot error when indeed it was caused by the Boeing MCAS flight automation system.

The Boeing 737 Max is a flying coffin and should never fly again.

Boeing will never recover from the stain on its reputation.

FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues

FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues
Chris Woodyard, USA TODAYPublished 4:14 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2019 | Updated 6:09 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2019

The Federal Aviation Administration is demanding answers from Boeing after receiving a 2016 electronic message exchange in which a test pilot talks of unknowingly having lied to regulators and discloses "egregious" problems with the flight control system that figured in two 737 Max crashes.
FAA Administrator Steve Dickson sent a terse letter Friday to Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg requesting to know why the messages had only been delivered the day before, not months ago when Boeing had uncovered them. "I expect your explanation immediately," he writes.
The 737 Max, the latest version of the jetliner that has evolved since first being flown in the 1960s, has been grounded worldwide since an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed in March, killing 157 aboard. It followed another accident involving a 737 Max flown by Lion Air by five months, claiming 189 passengers and crew.
In both crashes, blame has focused on the performance of the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, which was software added to the jets to make them fly like previous versions of the 737. It was deemed needed because the Max had larger engines than previous 737s that were repositioned on the wing, making the jet perform differently in some circumstances.
Pilots in both the Ethiopian and Lion Air jetliners wrestled with MCAS, which automatically switches on in certain situations, as it overrode their actions. MCAS kept pushing the nose of the planes down as they struggled to keep them aloft.
In the November 2016, message exchange, 737 chief test pilot Mark Forkner — Boeing describes him as a "former employee" — writes that MCAS is "running rampant in the sim on me," a reference to a flight simulator in which it was being tested at the time. "I am levelling off at like 4000 feet, 230 knots and the plane is trimming itself like crazy. I'm like, WHAT?" he said.
He quipped, "granted, I suck at flying, but even this was egregious."
Forkner said he "basically lied to the regulators (unknowingly)" based on the simulator experience though the co-worker is quick to counter, "it wasn't a lie, no one told us that was the case."

In a batch of emails that the FAA later sent, Forkner notes in a March 2016 missive to the FAA that mention of the MCAS system in flight crew operating manuals is unnecessary because MCAS is present in both of the plane's flight control computers, operates in a transparent way and was designed to kick in only in rare circumstances. Pilots have complained that the existence of the MCAS system was kept secret from them until after the Lion Air crash.
The discovery could become a huge complication for Muilenburg, who is set to testify Oct. 30 before the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for the first time about troubles with the 737 Max.
The FAA, the House committee and other authorities are investigating how MCAS was developed and approved for the 737 Max.
Boeing 737 Max fallout: Blasting Boeing, FAA, safety panel recommends changes in certification process
united-airlines-tarmac.jpg
United Airlines is canceling flights on its grounded 737 Max fleet until early January, joining Southwest and American in keeping the troubled airplane on the ground through the winter holiday season. (Photo: ronniechua / iStock)
In reaction to the disclosures, Boeing said it released the document to the House committee as part of its continued cooperation with its investigation as it strives to get the 737 Max back in service.
The ranking member of the House committee, Rep. Sam Graves, R-Mo., said the messages raise "a lot of questions" about conditions at the time of the test, what engineers were doing as the test was conducted and what Boeing did with the information.
Pilots union officials at two of the largest U.S. airline operators of the 737 Max, American and Southwest Airlines, reacted with dismay.
“This more evidence that Boeing misled pilots, government regulators and other aviation experts about the safety of the 737 Max," said Jon Weaks, president of Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, in a statement. "It is clear that the company’s negligence and fraud put the flying public at risk."
And Dennis Tajer, spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association for American, said "it's very serious if Boeing had someone within who is describing something egregious." He added, "We want to know under what conditions (MCAS was malfunctioning) so we can determine if something is new within the MCAS system."
He also said the union is solidly behind the FAA's Dickson on the matter. "We count on the FAA as a safety-culture partner." ...
 

OnePercenter

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Boeing is guilty of culpable homicide in the death of 346 people. Boeing was aware of pilot reports of dangerous flight characteristics of the 737 Max in 2016 and concealed the information.

Boeing management is scoundrels. They were very quick to pronounce the Indonesian 737 Max crash as pilot error when indeed it was caused by the Boeing MCAS flight automation system.

The Boeing 737 Max is a flying coffin and should never fly again.

Boeing will never recover from the stain on its reputation.

FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues

FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues
Chris Woodyard, USA TODAYPublished 4:14 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2019 | Updated 6:09 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2019

The Federal Aviation Administration is demanding answers from Boeing after receiving a 2016 electronic message exchange in which a test pilot talks of unknowingly having lied to regulators and discloses "egregious" problems with the flight control system that figured in two 737 Max crashes.
FAA Administrator Steve Dickson sent a terse letter Friday to Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg requesting to know why the messages had only been delivered the day before, not months ago when Boeing had uncovered them. "I expect your explanation immediately," he writes.
The 737 Max, the latest version of the jetliner that has evolved since first being flown in the 1960s, has been grounded worldwide since an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed in March, killing 157 aboard. It followed another accident involving a 737 Max flown by Lion Air by five months, claiming 189 passengers and crew.
In both crashes, blame has focused on the performance of the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, which was software added to the jets to make them fly like previous versions of the 737. It was deemed needed because the Max had larger engines than previous 737s that were repositioned on the wing, making the jet perform differently in some circumstances.
Pilots in both the Ethiopian and Lion Air jetliners wrestled with MCAS, which automatically switches on in certain situations, as it overrode their actions. MCAS kept pushing the nose of the planes down as they struggled to keep them aloft.
In the November 2016, message exchange, 737 chief test pilot Mark Forkner — Boeing describes him as a "former employee" — writes that MCAS is "running rampant in the sim on me," a reference to a flight simulator in which it was being tested at the time. "I am levelling off at like 4000 feet, 230 knots and the plane is trimming itself like crazy. I'm like, WHAT?" he said.
He quipped, "granted, I suck at flying, but even this was egregious."
Forkner said he "basically lied to the regulators (unknowingly)" based on the simulator experience though the co-worker is quick to counter, "it wasn't a lie, no one told us that was the case."

In a batch of emails that the FAA later sent, Forkner notes in a March 2016 missive to the FAA that mention of the MCAS system in flight crew operating manuals is unnecessary because MCAS is present in both of the plane's flight control computers, operates in a transparent way and was designed to kick in only in rare circumstances. Pilots have complained that the existence of the MCAS system was kept secret from them until after the Lion Air crash.
The discovery could become a huge complication for Muilenburg, who is set to testify Oct. 30 before the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for the first time about troubles with the 737 Max.
The FAA, the House committee and other authorities are investigating how MCAS was developed and approved for the 737 Max.
Boeing 737 Max fallout: Blasting Boeing, FAA, safety panel recommends changes in certification process
united-airlines-tarmac.jpg
United Airlines is canceling flights on its grounded 737 Max fleet until early January, joining Southwest and American in keeping the troubled airplane on the ground through the winter holiday season. (Photo: ronniechua / iStock)
In reaction to the disclosures, Boeing said it released the document to the House committee as part of its continued cooperation with its investigation as it strives to get the 737 Max back in service.
The ranking member of the House committee, Rep. Sam Graves, R-Mo., said the messages raise "a lot of questions" about conditions at the time of the test, what engineers were doing as the test was conducted and what Boeing did with the information.
Pilots union officials at two of the largest U.S. airline operators of the 737 Max, American and Southwest Airlines, reacted with dismay.
“This more evidence that Boeing misled pilots, government regulators and other aviation experts about the safety of the 737 Max," said Jon Weaks, president of Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, in a statement. "It is clear that the company’s negligence and fraud put the flying public at risk."
And Dennis Tajer, spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association for American, said "it's very serious if Boeing had someone within who is describing something egregious." He added, "We want to know under what conditions (MCAS was malfunctioning) so we can determine if something is new within the MCAS system."
He also said the union is solidly behind the FAA's Dickson on the matter. "We count on the FAA as a safety-culture partner." ...
FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues

The answer is; Investor returns.
 

Third Party

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Boeing is guilty of culpable homicide in the death of 346 people. Boeing was aware of pilot reports of dangerous flight characteristics of the 737 Max in 2016 and concealed the information.

Boeing management is scoundrels. They were very quick to pronounce the Indonesian 737 Max crash as pilot error when indeed it was caused by the Boeing MCAS flight automation system.

The Boeing 737 Max is a flying coffin and should never fly again.

Boeing will never recover from the stain on its reputation.

FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues

FAA asks Boeing why it hid test pilot's discovery of 'egregious' 737 Max issues
Chris Woodyard, USA TODAYPublished 4:14 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2019 | Updated 6:09 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2019

The Federal Aviation Administration is demanding answers from Boeing after receiving a 2016 electronic message exchange in which a test pilot talks of unknowingly having lied to regulators and discloses "egregious" problems with the flight control system that figured in two 737 Max crashes.
FAA Administrator Steve Dickson sent a terse letter Friday to Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg requesting to know why the messages had only been delivered the day before, not months ago when Boeing had uncovered them. "I expect your explanation immediately," he writes.
The 737 Max, the latest version of the jetliner that has evolved since first being flown in the 1960s, has been grounded worldwide since an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed in March, killing 157 aboard. It followed another accident involving a 737 Max flown by Lion Air by five months, claiming 189 passengers and crew.
In both crashes, blame has focused on the performance of the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, which was software added to the jets to make them fly like previous versions of the 737. It was deemed needed because the Max had larger engines than previous 737s that were repositioned on the wing, making the jet perform differently in some circumstances.
Pilots in both the Ethiopian and Lion Air jetliners wrestled with MCAS, which automatically switches on in certain situations, as it overrode their actions. MCAS kept pushing the nose of the planes down as they struggled to keep them aloft.
In the November 2016, message exchange, 737 chief test pilot Mark Forkner — Boeing describes him as a "former employee" — writes that MCAS is "running rampant in the sim on me," a reference to a flight simulator in which it was being tested at the time. "I am levelling off at like 4000 feet, 230 knots and the plane is trimming itself like crazy. I'm like, WHAT?" he said.
He quipped, "granted, I suck at flying, but even this was egregious."
Forkner said he "basically lied to the regulators (unknowingly)" based on the simulator experience though the co-worker is quick to counter, "it wasn't a lie, no one told us that was the case."

In a batch of emails that the FAA later sent, Forkner notes in a March 2016 missive to the FAA that mention of the MCAS system in flight crew operating manuals is unnecessary because MCAS is present in both of the plane's flight control computers, operates in a transparent way and was designed to kick in only in rare circumstances. Pilots have complained that the existence of the MCAS system was kept secret from them until after the Lion Air crash.
The discovery could become a huge complication for Muilenburg, who is set to testify Oct. 30 before the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for the first time about troubles with the 737 Max.
The FAA, the House committee and other authorities are investigating how MCAS was developed and approved for the 737 Max.
Boeing 737 Max fallout: Blasting Boeing, FAA, safety panel recommends changes in certification process
united-airlines-tarmac.jpg
United Airlines is canceling flights on its grounded 737 Max fleet until early January, joining Southwest and American in keeping the troubled airplane on the ground through the winter holiday season. (Photo: ronniechua / iStock)
In reaction to the disclosures, Boeing said it released the document to the House committee as part of its continued cooperation with its investigation as it strives to get the 737 Max back in service.
The ranking member of the House committee, Rep. Sam Graves, R-Mo., said the messages raise "a lot of questions" about conditions at the time of the test, what engineers were doing as the test was conducted and what Boeing did with the information.
Pilots union officials at two of the largest U.S. airline operators of the 737 Max, American and Southwest Airlines, reacted with dismay.
“This more evidence that Boeing misled pilots, government regulators and other aviation experts about the safety of the 737 Max," said Jon Weaks, president of Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, in a statement. "It is clear that the company’s negligence and fraud put the flying public at risk."
And Dennis Tajer, spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association for American, said "it's very serious if Boeing had someone within who is describing something egregious." He added, "We want to know under what conditions (MCAS was malfunctioning) so we can determine if something is new within the MCAS system."
He also said the union is solidly behind the FAA's Dickson on the matter. "We count on the FAA as a safety-culture partner." ...
We'll watch what happens with you
 

wamose

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Boeing needs to go back to the days when engineers ran the show. Now that they put businessmen with nothing but profit motive in charge, it was only a matter of time before they did something like this. Fire their management and put the engineers back in control.
 
OP
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Wrong topic post deleted.
 
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impuretrash

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Will investigations lead to the incarceration of the First Felon?

This issue is starting to get traction in the media. Trump is a liar and a cheat in business. Trump aides have admitted that Trump is deliberately manipulating the stock market.

"President Donald Trump’s career as a businessman has been a forty-year testament to several realities. Among them, his over-the-top avarice, his ability to con the media into thinking he is far wealthier than he really is, and illustrating just how difficult it really is to make lots of money without ever having come up with a great idea (just ask the “graduates” of the now defunct and always fraudulent Trump University)."

"Carl Icahn, a Trump friend and former adviser, is apparently being investigated for having sold over $30 million in steel stock just before Trump first announced his plan to dramatically raise tariffs on China. Then, last week — in a story that, due largely to our dangerous collective desensitization towards utterly insane stories coming out of the Trump White House, got shockingly little media coverage — came a smoking gun. Multiple Trump aides actually admitted that the president lied about the status of talks with China on tariffs with the purpose of artificially boosting the stock market."

Could Trump Be Manipulating the Stock Market?

Why Doesn’t the Media Seem to Care That Trump Could Be Deliberately Manipulating the Stock Market?
By John ZieglerSep 3rd, 2019, 5:04 pm

President Donald Trump’s career as a businessman has been a forty-year testament to several realities. Among them, his over-the-top avarice, his ability to con the media into thinking he is far wealthier than he really is, and illustrating just how difficult it really is to make lots of money without ever having come up with a great idea (just ask the “graduates” of the now defunct and always fraudulent Trump University).

Now, as president of the United States, Trump suddenly possesses the ability to cause investors to make or lose millions — if not billions — of dollars in just a few hours. And all he has to do is tweet something particularly positive or negative about his economic policy, especially if it is about tariffs, which the market almost universally hates.

The fact that he has the prodigious power to move the stock market is not in question, and has been on full display during the recent period of extreme market volatility (today the Dow Jones average lost almost 300 points, mostly due to Trump’s new tariffs against China being instituted). Bloomberg News keeps a running tally of Trump’s economic tweets and their impact on the stock market, and the Wall Street Journal recently documented this phenomenon in much the same manner.

And yet, very strangely, there has been almost no mainstream media analysis of whether Trump could be manipulating the market deliberately, and with ill-intent. While speculative, and way outside the bounds of behavior that would be conceivable for a “normal” president (which may be why the news media has a blind spot here), it seems that there exists a very strong circumstantial case that something extremely unethical, perhaps even illegal, could be happening here, and that media should at least be asking questions about the issue.

First off: Trump, far more than any other modern president, is obsessed with money in general and the status of the stock market in particular, habitually bragging about gains in its value (even though the “Trump Market” lags far behind what the “Obama Market” did over eight years). Second, as president he has not been shy about doing things that enrich him, like scheduling regular government-funded trips to Trump-owned properties, benefiting those who stay at his D.C. hotel or are members at his clubs, and even lobbying the Federal Reserve Chairman to lower interest rates in a way that would personally save him millions in the costs of his loans.

There is even evidence that Trump successfully engaged in a market manipulation scheme, which involved using his celebrity to dupe the news media, back in the 1980s. And Carl Icahn, a Trump friend and former adviser, is apparently being investigated for having sold over $30 million in steel stock just before Trump first announced his plan to dramatically raise tariffs on China.
Then, last week — in a story that, due largely to our dangerous collective desensitization towards utterly insane stories coming out of the Trump White House, got shockingly little media coverage — came a smoking gun. Multiple Trump aides actually admitted that the president lied about the status of talks with China on tariffs with the purpose of artificially boosting the stock market.
So we have a president with a history of highly suspicious activity in this realm, who has proven that he is totally unrestricted by ethical restraints or a hesitancy to be deceitful, and who could pull off a market manipulation scheme with almost no effort and with inherent plausible deniability (especially since tariffs would theoretically be the perfectly designed weapon of market manipulation). In short, expecting Trump to avoid the extraordinary temptation of abusing this kind of power would be like leaving an obese child alone in a candy store for an extended period of time and somehow believing that they won’t break their diet.
To be clear, even I don’t think that Trump would be dumb enough to manipulate the market for his own direct personal enrichment, if only because that would be far too easy to eventually prove. While Trump is a moron when it comes to facts about the world, he is darn near a savant when the topic is his own survival and discerning exactly what he can get away with.
What I am suggesting is possible, is something more along the lines of Trump creating enormous value for people who can be helpful to him by simply tipping them off — perhaps by “innocently” calling for their advice — that he is planning on tweeting, for instance, that a deal with China is in the works. Because tariffs are one of those rare matters on which everyone knows where the market stands, having that kind of knowledge, especially for someone experienced in day trading, would be like handing a teenage boy the key to the changing room at a Victoria’s Secret fashion show.
For those who would say that this doesn’t make sense because most of Trump’s declarations on tariffs, especially recently, have driven the stock market down, there are at least two rebuttals. The first is that lots of money can be made shorting the market, and the second is that it is much easier to make the market go up once you eventually cave on tariffs if you have already greatly devalued it due to your previous fixation on the issue.
In fact, in a logical world, you could even argue that Trump causing the market to go down, when it is so obviously contrary to his goal of reelection, is a strong indication that there may be some other force of self-interest (the only power Trump understands) motivating him to facilitate this outcome. Obviously none of these comes close to proving that Trump cynically — and perhaps illegally — manipulating the stock market, but isn’t time for the news media and major Democrats to at least start asking the question?
Your severe case of TDS compelled you to go off on a wild tangent and derail your own thread. Good job.
 
OP
Denizen

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Will investigations lead to the incarceration of the First Felon?

This issue is starting to get traction in the media. Trump is a liar and a cheat in business. Trump aides have admitted that Trump is deliberately manipulating the stock market.

"President Donald Trump’s career as a businessman has been a forty-year testament to several realities. Among them, his over-the-top avarice, his ability to con the media into thinking he is far wealthier than he really is, and illustrating just how difficult it really is to make lots of money without ever having come up with a great idea (just ask the “graduates” of the now defunct and always fraudulent Trump University)."

"Carl Icahn, a Trump friend and former adviser, is apparently being investigated for having sold over $30 million in steel stock just before Trump first announced his plan to dramatically raise tariffs on China. Then, last week — in a story that, due largely to our dangerous collective desensitization towards utterly insane stories coming out of the Trump White House, got shockingly little media coverage — came a smoking gun. Multiple Trump aides actually admitted that the president lied about the status of talks with China on tariffs with the purpose of artificially boosting the stock market."

Could Trump Be Manipulating the Stock Market?

Why Doesn’t the Media Seem to Care That Trump Could Be Deliberately Manipulating the Stock Market?
By John ZieglerSep 3rd, 2019, 5:04 pm

President Donald Trump’s career as a businessman has been a forty-year testament to several realities. Among them, his over-the-top avarice, his ability to con the media into thinking he is far wealthier than he really is, and illustrating just how difficult it really is to make lots of money without ever having come up with a great idea (just ask the “graduates” of the now defunct and always fraudulent Trump University).

Now, as president of the United States, Trump suddenly possesses the ability to cause investors to make or lose millions — if not billions — of dollars in just a few hours. And all he has to do is tweet something particularly positive or negative about his economic policy, especially if it is about tariffs, which the market almost universally hates.

The fact that he has the prodigious power to move the stock market is not in question, and has been on full display during the recent period of extreme market volatility (today the Dow Jones average lost almost 300 points, mostly due to Trump’s new tariffs against China being instituted). Bloomberg News keeps a running tally of Trump’s economic tweets and their impact on the stock market, and the Wall Street Journal recently documented this phenomenon in much the same manner.

And yet, very strangely, there has been almost no mainstream media analysis of whether Trump could be manipulating the market deliberately, and with ill-intent. While speculative, and way outside the bounds of behavior that would be conceivable for a “normal” president (which may be why the news media has a blind spot here), it seems that there exists a very strong circumstantial case that something extremely unethical, perhaps even illegal, could be happening here, and that media should at least be asking questions about the issue.

First off: Trump, far more than any other modern president, is obsessed with money in general and the status of the stock market in particular, habitually bragging about gains in its value (even though the “Trump Market” lags far behind what the “Obama Market” did over eight years). Second, as president he has not been shy about doing things that enrich him, like scheduling regular government-funded trips to Trump-owned properties, benefiting those who stay at his D.C. hotel or are members at his clubs, and even lobbying the Federal Reserve Chairman to lower interest rates in a way that would personally save him millions in the costs of his loans.

There is even evidence that Trump successfully engaged in a market manipulation scheme, which involved using his celebrity to dupe the news media, back in the 1980s. And Carl Icahn, a Trump friend and former adviser, is apparently being investigated for having sold over $30 million in steel stock just before Trump first announced his plan to dramatically raise tariffs on China.
Then, last week — in a story that, due largely to our dangerous collective desensitization towards utterly insane stories coming out of the Trump White House, got shockingly little media coverage — came a smoking gun. Multiple Trump aides actually admitted that the president lied about the status of talks with China on tariffs with the purpose of artificially boosting the stock market.
So we have a president with a history of highly suspicious activity in this realm, who has proven that he is totally unrestricted by ethical restraints or a hesitancy to be deceitful, and who could pull off a market manipulation scheme with almost no effort and with inherent plausible deniability (especially since tariffs would theoretically be the perfectly designed weapon of market manipulation). In short, expecting Trump to avoid the extraordinary temptation of abusing this kind of power would be like leaving an obese child alone in a candy store for an extended period of time and somehow believing that they won’t break their diet.
To be clear, even I don’t think that Trump would be dumb enough to manipulate the market for his own direct personal enrichment, if only because that would be far too easy to eventually prove. While Trump is a moron when it comes to facts about the world, he is darn near a savant when the topic is his own survival and discerning exactly what he can get away with.
What I am suggesting is possible, is something more along the lines of Trump creating enormous value for people who can be helpful to him by simply tipping them off — perhaps by “innocently” calling for their advice — that he is planning on tweeting, for instance, that a deal with China is in the works. Because tariffs are one of those rare matters on which everyone knows where the market stands, having that kind of knowledge, especially for someone experienced in day trading, would be like handing a teenage boy the key to the changing room at a Victoria’s Secret fashion show.
For those who would say that this doesn’t make sense because most of Trump’s declarations on tariffs, especially recently, have driven the stock market down, there are at least two rebuttals. The first is that lots of money can be made shorting the market, and the second is that it is much easier to make the market go up once you eventually cave on tariffs if you have already greatly devalued it due to your previous fixation on the issue.
In fact, in a logical world, you could even argue that Trump causing the market to go down, when it is so obviously contrary to his goal of reelection, is a strong indication that there may be some other force of self-interest (the only power Trump understands) motivating him to facilitate this outcome. Obviously none of these comes close to proving that Trump cynically — and perhaps illegally — manipulating the stock market, but isn’t time for the news media and major Democrats to at least start asking the question?
Your severe case of TDS compelled you to go off on a wild tangent and derail your own thread. Good job.
It was a mistake where I clicked the wrong subject.

However, it did serve a useful purpose in exposing impuretrash as a stalker.
 

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