Isis and Yemen

MACAULAY

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Have we ever had a worse fool for a president?

Last February, he called ISIS the Junior Varsity, and today, he is asking for authority to wage war on it on the stated ground that it constitutes a threat to our national security.

Just last September, he called Yemen one of his two great foreign policy successes, and today, we are evacuating our Embassy.

19% of the Folks approve of his foreign policy.

Who are these 19%?

I think New York and California and the Mental Institutions have been over-polled.
 
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Donald Polish

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Have we ever had a worse fool for a president?

Last February, he called ISIS the Junior Varsity, and today, he is asking for authority to wage war on it on the stated ground that it constitutes a threat to our national security.

Just last September, he called Yemen one of his two great foreign policy successes, and today, we are evacuating our Embassy.

19% of the Folks approve of his foreign policy.

Who are these 19%?

I think New York and California and the Mental Institutions have been over-polled.
For every Al Qaeda head they kill, there's 5 more ready to take the helm. It's a good strategy that will keep the organization fumbling for a while, but it's ultimately up to the nations that harbor these terrorists to implement policies that will deal with current terrorists and deter others from becoming terrorists. If nations don't comply, end all foreign aid until they do. If they still continue to harbor terrorists, take more serious action depending on the severity of the case.
 

waltky

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Well, at least ISIS not gaining any ground in Yemen...

ISIS Fails to Gain Much Traction in Yemen
March 28, 2016 - Al Qaeda’s local branch thrives in war’s chaos while Islamic State loses ground
His face shrouded in a scarf and an assault rifle in his lap, a man calling himself Antar al-Kindi appeared in a video released in January and described how Islamic State in Yemen urged him to kill his family. Instead of carrying out the order, though, Mr. Kindi used the video to renounce the extremist group, providing one more sign of Islamic State’s losses in the war-torn country. “Islamic State has no respect for Muslim blood,” the man, purportedly a former member of Islamic State’s Yemen branch, said in the video. The video’s authenticity couldn’t be independently verified. It was distributed by a jihadist media-production company, and Mr. Kindi’s accent placed him as a native of southeastern Yemen, where there is a heavy extremist presence.

The March 22 attacks in Brussels that killed at least 35 people demonstrated Islamic State’s expanding reach, even as the group suffers military setbacks in its self-declared caliphate in Syria and Iraq. Islamic State is also struggling to gain traction in Yemen, despite a security vacuum ripe for exploitation, even as the country’s potent al Qaeda branch, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, thrives. Unlike in Libya, Islamic State hasn’t forged alliances with local jihadists such as al Qaeda. Islamic State fighters in Yemen are estimated to number in the hundreds, compared with several thousand for AQAP. Meanwhile, dozens of Islamic State members in Yemen have publicly complained about the leadership, viewing it as foreign and disconnected, and accusing it of extreme brutality, disregard for its own fighters and poor battlefield decision making.


People gathered at the site of a suicide car-bombing outside Yemen's presidential palace in Aden on Jan. 28, an attack that was claimed by Islamic State​

In the absence of a strong central government, Yemenis at times have tolerated even terrorist groups that provided health, judicial and security services. Unlike al Qaeda, Islamic State hasn’t done so in areas where it operates and so is less enmeshed in local tribal networks. Elisabeth Kendall, an Oxford University expert on Yemeni extremism who has traveled recently to tribal areas, said Islamic State's model, which hinges on central command and tolerates little autonomy, doesn’t fit well in Yemen. “In Yemen, the heartlands of al Qaeda in the east are not places that even responded well in the past to a central government,” she said. “So what on earth would make them answerable to caliphate based in Syria or Iraq that’s even more remote?”

Katherine Zimmerman, an analyst at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, noted that many Islamic State leaders in Yemen are reportedly Saudi, “and that does not sit well with Yemenis.” Impoverished Yemen has longstanding economic ties with its far bigger and richer neighbor, but the political relationship has been strained in recent years. Despite a flurry of “eight or so” Islamic State cells announced in Yemen last year, only two are visibly active now, in the southern provinces of Aden and Hadramout, she said. At the same time, al Qaeda branches seem to be retaining their grass-roots appeal, Ms. Kendall said. “While Islamic State might be doing more spectacular attacks…in numbers al Qaeda is more active,” she said. “In the West some of our agencies have taken their eye off the ball.”

MORE
 

irosie91

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Well, at least ISIS not gaining any ground in Yemen...

ISIS Fails to Gain Much Traction in Yemen
March 28, 2016 - Al Qaeda’s local branch thrives in war’s chaos while Islamic State loses ground
His face shrouded in a scarf and an assault rifle in his lap, a man calling himself Antar al-Kindi appeared in a video released in January and described how Islamic State in Yemen urged him to kill his family. Instead of carrying out the order, though, Mr. Kindi used the video to renounce the extremist group, providing one more sign of Islamic State’s losses in the war-torn country. “Islamic State has no respect for Muslim blood,” the man, purportedly a former member of Islamic State’s Yemen branch, said in the video. The video’s authenticity couldn’t be independently verified. It was distributed by a jihadist media-production company, and Mr. Kindi’s accent placed him as a native of southeastern Yemen, where there is a heavy extremist presence.

The March 22 attacks in Brussels that killed at least 35 people demonstrated Islamic State’s expanding reach, even as the group suffers military setbacks in its self-declared caliphate in Syria and Iraq. Islamic State is also struggling to gain traction in Yemen, despite a security vacuum ripe for exploitation, even as the country’s potent al Qaeda branch, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, thrives. Unlike in Libya, Islamic State hasn’t forged alliances with local jihadists such as al Qaeda. Islamic State fighters in Yemen are estimated to number in the hundreds, compared with several thousand for AQAP. Meanwhile, dozens of Islamic State members in Yemen have publicly complained about the leadership, viewing it as foreign and disconnected, and accusing it of extreme brutality, disregard for its own fighters and poor battlefield decision making.


People gathered at the site of a suicide car-bombing outside Yemen's presidential palace in Aden on Jan. 28, an attack that was claimed by Islamic State​

In the absence of a strong central government, Yemenis at times have tolerated even terrorist groups that provided health, judicial and security services. Unlike al Qaeda, Islamic State hasn’t done so in areas where it operates and so is less enmeshed in local tribal networks. Elisabeth Kendall, an Oxford University expert on Yemeni extremism who has traveled recently to tribal areas, said Islamic State's model, which hinges on central command and tolerates little autonomy, doesn’t fit well in Yemen. “In Yemen, the heartlands of al Qaeda in the east are not places that even responded well in the past to a central government,” she said. “So what on earth would make them answerable to caliphate based in Syria or Iraq that’s even more remote?”

Katherine Zimmerman, an analyst at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, noted that many Islamic State leaders in Yemen are reportedly Saudi, “and that does not sit well with Yemenis.” Impoverished Yemen has longstanding economic ties with its far bigger and richer neighbor, but the political relationship has been strained in recent years. Despite a flurry of “eight or so” Islamic State cells announced in Yemen last year, only two are visibly active now, in the southern provinces of Aden and Hadramout, she said. At the same time, al Qaeda branches seem to be retaining their grass-roots appeal, Ms. Kendall said. “While Islamic State might be doing more spectacular attacks…in numbers al Qaeda is more active,” she said. “In the West some of our agencies have taken their eye off the ball.”

MORE
Isis is not as well armed and funded as is HEZBOLLAH and the Iranian shills
HOUTHIS
 

waltky

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Yemen Named as Nation Where Risk of Mass Killing Rose Most...

Study: Yemen Named as Nation Where Risk of Mass Killing Rose Most in 2016
Thursday 20th July, 2017 - Yemen was named on Thursday as the nation where the risk of genocide or mass killing rose the most last year, while Syria topped an annual 'Peoples Under Threat' index for the third consecutive year.
The index, by human rights group Minority Rights Group International (MRG), said vulnerable people were at risk in a growing number of no-go zones around the world with a lack of access from the outside world allowing killing to go unchecked. The report comes after United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein last month condemned some governments for refusing access to U.N. officials while a study this week showed the U.N. had succeeded in preventing wars.

The 12th MRG index found the risks rose most markedly in Yemen last year, with the impoverished Arab country devastated by a war between a Saudi-led coalition and Iran-allied Houthis that has killed more than 10,000 people and left millions starving. 'Parties on both sides of the conflict have violated international humanitarian law with impunity,' the report said. 'International isolation is a known risk factor for genocide or mass killing,' added Mark Lattimer, MRG's executive director, in a statement.


Yemen was listed as No. 8 in a list of 70 countries where people are seen as being at risk, behind Syria, Somalia, Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan, South Sudan and Democratic Republic of the Congo. Other countries to move significantly in the list last year were Libya, Nigeria, Eritrea and Turkey. The MRG report said the failed coup in Turkey last year was followed by a nationwide program of dismissals and arrests of tens of thousands of public officials. Requests by the U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for 'effective and unfettered access' continues to be denied, the report said. 'If governments are increasingly evading international scrutiny, this is a serious concern,' Lattimer said.

Preventing war

A study released on Wednesday by the U.S.'s Dartmouth College and Ohio State University found the United Nations has been an effective force at preventing wars over its history. The review of more than 5,000 voting records found the 193-member state organization provides a forum for diplomacy and communication, fostering alliances and reducing conflict. 'There is more nuance in voting records than we previously thought,' said Skyler Cranmer, professor of political science at Ohio State University. 'The evidence demonstrates that the U.N. is more effective at achieving its mandate of avoiding wars than many experts think.'

Study Yemen Named as Nation Where Risk of Mass Killing Rose Most in 2016
 

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