What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Faith and Firearms

OP
McRib

McRib

Diamond Member
Joined
May 7, 2017
Messages
10,304
Reaction score
8,195
Points
2,140
Location
Midwest - Trumplandia
Might as well stop reading there. When you see a sentence like that, you can pretty safely assume that the entire article is going to consist of similar bullshit.

Skimming over the whole article, it appears that the intent is to attack both the right to keep and bear arms, and also Christianity in general.

Even by New York Times standards, this is an extraordinarily bullshitty article.
There is nothing inaccurate in the opening sentence.
 

flacaltenn

Diamond Member
Staff member
Senior USMB Moderator
Moderator
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
67,506
Reaction score
22,773
Points
2,250
Location
Hillbilly Hollywood, Tenn
There is nothing inaccurate in the opening sentence.

Was there a PRINT picture of the child holding a gun in the NYTimes article? -- because there's no evidence HERE to back up that 1st paragraph.

Also the part of "more likely to be killed by your own firearm" LIE is based on the fact that 60% of suicides in the US annually are committed with guns. NOT from the companies being RELIGIOUSLY discriminated here making the "mass shooter" rifles. NYTimes will CONTINUE to ignore that fact and not informed their readers that "the study" WAS debunked.
 
OP
McRib

McRib

Diamond Member
Joined
May 7, 2017
Messages
10,304
Reaction score
8,195
Points
2,140
Location
Midwest - Trumplandia
Was there a PRINT picture of the child holding a gun in the NYTimes article? -- because there's no evidence HERE to back up that 1st paragraph
Yes, there was. I can't post it here, but there is literally a child sitting on the floor with a gun in his lap, the child is a toddler.
 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
46,063
Reaction score
29,733
Points
2,615
Location
Tejas
This is a lie.

No one seeks to ‘ban’ or ‘confiscate’ guns.
You are a fucking liar.

Why did YOU fuckers try to have the SCOTUS declare the right collective only?

Because.....


YOU'RE TRYING TO BAN AND CONFISCATE YOU LYING PIECE OF SHIT.
 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
46,063
Reaction score
29,733
Points
2,615
Location
Tejas
This is a lie.

No one seeks to ‘ban’ or ‘confiscate’ guns.
In fact...


The only way to be sure that you liars don't ban and confiscate is to make the right absolute and strike down ALL gun laws, then execute anyone trying to get new gun laws.


Now, do you want to maintain the status quo or should we go ahead and get machine guns?
 

The Duke

Diamond Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2022
Messages
6,000
Reaction score
6,532
Points
1,908
In case you get paywalled, I will post the most relevant text from the article. It really is striking how American "Christians" and guns have formed this partnership.

Mod Note: Dont take long copyrighted quotes. Rules require adherence to DCMA "fair use" practice at USMB. We've already gotten one copyright nastygram this week. McRib

Daniel Defense, the Georgia company whose gun enabled the slaughter at Robb Elementary School, presents its corporate identity in explicitly religious terms. At the time of the shooting, the company’s social media presence included an image of a toddler with a rifle in his lap above the text of Proverbs 22:6 (“Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old, he will not depart from it”). For Easter, it posted a photograph of a gun and a cross resting on scriptural passages recounting the Resurrection.

In Florida, Spike’s Tactical (“the finest AR-15s on the planet”) makes a line of Crusader weapons adorned with a quote from the Psalms. Missouri-based CMMG (“the leading manufacturer of AR15 rifles, components and small parts”) advertises its employees’ “commitment to meet each and every morning to pray for God’s wisdom in managing the enormous responsibility that comes with this business.” And in Colorado, Cornerstone Arms explains that it is so named because “Jesus Christ is the cornerstone of our business, our family and our lives” and the “Second Amendment to our Constitution is the cornerstone of the freedom we enjoy as American citizens.”


<Moderation Snip>

It is easy to miss, but this melding of evangelism and the right to bear arms is a step beyond the “natural rights” argument for gun ownership, which holds that self-defense is a law of nature required to protect life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. These rights are often said to be God-given in the sense of being taken for granted, and they are enshrined as such in the Declaration of Independence. As interpreted by many evangelicals, the distant deistic “creator” Thomas Jefferson credited with endowing such rights has become a specific, biblical deity who apparently takes an active interest in the availability of assault rifles.

<Moderation Snip>

We can see the implications of this even in ostensibly nonreligious aspects of our current gun debate, which are influenced by theological assumptions in surprising ways. The insistence that guns are used constantly and successfully for self-defense and protecting the community found its most infamous expression in the wake of the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, when the National Rifle Association’s Wayne LaPierre said, “The only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.”

Since then, despite being debunked by data showing that firearms are more likely to injure their owners or their owners’ families than safeguard them, the protection offered by good guys with guns has emerged as an article of faith, supported with anecdotal evidence passed around like legends of the saints.

One of the most repeated of these tales recounts the story of a man who truly did halt a mass shooting, albeit only after 26 people were dead. On Nov. 5, 2017, when a gunman attacked the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, a soft-spoken plumber and former firearms instructor named Stephen Willeford shot him with his AR-15. Contributing to the N.R.A.’s effort to spread the Gospel of the Good Guy With a Gun, Mr. Willeford spoke to the group’s Leadership Forum six months later.


<Moderation Snip>



kxtEgqJ.jpg
 

💲 Amazon Deals 💲

Forum List

Top