Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

Disir

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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
 

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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
 
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Disir

Disir

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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
 
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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
Yep...just another criminal.
 

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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
Yep...just another criminal.
Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
 
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Disir

Disir

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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
Yep...just another criminal.
Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
 

Buck111

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HOUSTON (AP) — For university student Bryan Sweeney, the three days he spent at the Harris County Jail in Houston before he could pay his $10,000 bail for two misdemeanor charges, including for driving with a suspended license, cost him a chance to register for classes and graduate this summer. But Sweeney, an accounting major at Texas Southern University, said he's lucky, as others in a similar situation might never have been able to pay.


"It's pretty mentally difficult to fight a misdemeanor from inside of jail," said Sweeney, 27, who described the tough choice many poor defendants face. "I can get out and all I got to do is say, 'I'm guilty,' or I can sit in jail, sacrifice my freedoms and fight a misdemeanor case for the next six months that I can't afford," he said.

Criminal justice reform advocates say U.S. bail systems unfairly keep low-income defendants — many of whom are minorities arrested for nonviolent crimes — in jail for too long, which not only leads to overcrowding but can affect the outcome of their cases. In Harris County, the nation's third most populous, local officials say they are aware of the problems and recently implemented a $5.3 million plan, including a $2 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, to jumpstart reforms.

....San Francisco is testing the pretrial risk assessment tool Harris County will be using, which is already being used in about 30 jurisdictions across the country.

Bail practices in Texas' biggest county under scrutiny

More assessment tools? Really?
If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
Yep...just another criminal.
Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
 
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Disir

Disir

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If it's the same Bryan Sweeney I found he's had multiple arrests for everything from cocaine possession to driving under the influence.
That would explain the high bail.
Have to do some more digging to make sure.
Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
Yep...just another criminal.
Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
 

Buck111

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Can you see how many warrants he has had for failing to appear as well?



CASE # 136645601010 BOOKING DATE 10/31/2012 CHARGE POSS CS PG 1 COURT 337 COURT DATE 11/01/2012 BOND AMT 2000.00 FINE BALANCE DUE

It looks like he was arrested in Nov of 2015.
Yep...just another criminal.
Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
 
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Disir

Disir

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Yep...just another criminal.
Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.
 

Buck111

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Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.
The #1 killer drug in the U.S. are prescription drugs handed out by doctors like candy.

Cocaine addiction is not a "crime - it is an illness and should be treated as such. And, arresting a person for DUI is not knowingly preventing an accident. The top 3 causes of automobile accidents are: 1. Distracted driving. 2. Speeding. 3. DUI.
Strangely enough, distracted driving and speeding do not carry near the same penalty as DUI. If you want to prevent accidents 1. take away peoples cellphones, outlaw car radios, do away with drive thru eateries and put people in jail for being distracted. 2. Put computers in cars that receive a signal from speed limit signs that will regulate the speed of the car. 3. Do not arrest people for DUI unless they have actually broken a law that shows they are not capable of driving safely.

What evidence do you have this man failed to appear or violated probation?
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Unless there is an actual victim there is no crime. Meaning this gentleman is not a "criminal" if he caused no harm. He would better be described as a "rule violator".
That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.

This guys attempts at moral relativism are sad and pathetic.
He's either an old hippy or a twenty something dimwit living in his parents basement.
 

Buck111

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That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.

This guys attempts at moral relativism are sad and pathetic.
He's either an old hippy or a twenty something dimwit living in his parents basement.
Very adult response there, HereWeGoAgain.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.

This guys attempts at moral relativism are sad and pathetic.
He's either an old hippy or a twenty something dimwit living in his parents basement.
Very adult response there, HereWeGoAgain.
I just call em like I see em.
 

Buck111

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Well then, you don't see 'em to well, do ya?
Two things I am not: A hippy or a kid living in his parents basement. Care to try again?
 
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Disir

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That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.
The #1 killer drug in the U.S. are prescription drugs handed out by doctors like candy.

Cocaine addiction is not a "crime - it is an illness and should be treated as such. And, arresting a person for DUI is not knowingly preventing an accident. The top 3 causes of automobile accidents are: 1. Distracted driving. 2. Speeding. 3. DUI.
Strangely enough, distracted driving and speeding do not carry near the same penalty as DUI. If you want to prevent accidents 1. take away peoples cellphones, outlaw car radios, do away with drive thru eateries and put people in jail for being distracted. 2. Put computers in cars that receive a signal from speed limit signs that will regulate the speed of the car. 3. Do not arrest people for DUI unless they have actually broken a law that shows they are not capable of driving safely.

What evidence do you have this man failed to appear or violated probation?
That he jumped from a $2,000 dollar for a level 3 felony of possession 1-4 grams of cocaine to a $10,000 bail. He was in jail for a total of 3 days and offered the line his rights were violated and you have to plead guilty. Between $2,000 and $10,000 something else occurred or alternatively the individual was being investigated for an additional charge within that incident that was far more serious.The misdemeanor bail is $500.

The point, which you are totally missing either unwittingly or intentionally, is that risk assessments should not take the place of any judge nor should they be utilized for any type of automatic release (or in determining releases from prison either). Harris county began using criteria set in a risk assessment (by the Arnold Foundation based on algorithms) in May of this last year. Get this....it means you do not interact with those arrested and it is based on prior court documents. Note, they have already been found to be unreliable.

When the first risk assessment did not get what was wanted another human interest story was thrown out there with continued grants from the MaCarthur foundation.

What they are seeking is what is called "free bail" decided by a "diagnostic" tool.

Personal bonds "free bail" which do take place are based on a person's criminal history and current charge. It is fantastically funny considering the organizations funding these are crying about what they deem as a cookie cutter approach at the same time they are implementing.......a cookie cutter approach.

I'm not interested in distracted driving.

But, I can address your issue:
On deaths (from overdosing) and has nothing to do with bail:
More people died from drug overdoses in 2014 than in any year on record. The majority of drug overdose deaths (more than six out of ten) involve an opioid.1 And since 1999, the number of overdose deaths involving opioids (including prescription opioid pain relievers and heroin) nearly quadrupled.2 From 2000 to 2014 nearly half a million people died from drug overdoses. 78 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.

We now know that overdoses from prescription opioid pain relievers are a driving factor in the 15-year increase in opioid overdose deaths. Since 1999, the amount of prescription opioids sold in the U.S. nearly quadrupled,2 yet there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.3,4 Deaths from prescription opioids—drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone—have also quadrupled since 1999.5
Understanding the Epidemic | Drug Overdose | CDC Injury Center
  • In 2014, 9,967 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes, accounting for nearly one-third (31%) of all traffic-related deaths in the United States.1
  • Of the 1,070 traffic deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years in 2014, 209 (19%) involved an alcohol-impaired driver.1
  • Of the 209 child passengers ages 14 and younger who died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes in 2014, over half (116) were riding in the vehicle with the alcohol-impaired driver.1
  • In 2014, over 1.1 million drivers were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics.3 That's one percent of the 121 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. adults each year.4
  • Drugs other than alcohol (legal and illegal) are involved in about 16% of motor vehicle crashes.5
  • Marijuana use is increasing6 and 13% of nighttime, weekend drivers have marijuana in their system.7
  • Marijuana users were about 25% more likely to be involved in a crash than drivers with no evidence of marijuana use, however other factors – such as age and gender – may account for the increased crash risk among marijuana users.5
Drivers with prior driving while impaired (DWI) convictions:

  • Drivers with a BAC of 0.08% or higher involved in fatal crashes were seven times more likely to have a prior conviction for DWI than were drivers with no alcohol in their system. (7% and 1%, respectively).1
 
Last edited:
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Disir

Disir

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That's not how it works. He is a criminal. If you have multiple arrests in a certain time period then the behavior is escalating.
Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.

This guys attempts at moral relativism are sad and pathetic.
He's either an old hippy or a twenty something dimwit living in his parents basement.
It's all over the place and I don't think he understands how it works.
 

Buck111

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Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.
The #1 killer drug in the U.S. are prescription drugs handed out by doctors like candy.

Cocaine addiction is not a "crime - it is an illness and should be treated as such. And, arresting a person for DUI is not knowingly preventing an accident. The top 3 causes of automobile accidents are: 1. Distracted driving. 2. Speeding. 3. DUI.
Strangely enough, distracted driving and speeding do not carry near the same penalty as DUI. If you want to prevent accidents 1. take away peoples cellphones, outlaw car radios, do away with drive thru eateries and put people in jail for being distracted. 2. Put computers in cars that receive a signal from speed limit signs that will regulate the speed of the car. 3. Do not arrest people for DUI unless they have actually broken a law that shows they are not capable of driving safely.

What evidence do you have this man failed to appear or violated probation?
That he jumped from a $2,000 dollar for a level 3 felony of possession 1-4 grams of cocaine to a $10,000 bail. He was in jail for a total of 3 days and offered the line his rights were violated and you have to plead guilty. Between $2,000 and $10,000 something else occurred or alternatively the individual was being investigated for an additional charge within that incident that was far more serious.The misdemeanor bail is $500.

The point, which you are totally missing either unwittingly or intentionally, is that risk assessments should not take the place of any judge nor should they be utilized for any type of automatic release (or in determining releases from prison either). Harris county began using criteria set in a risk assessment (by the Arnold Foundation based on algorithms) in May of this last year. Get this....it means you do not interact with those arrested and it is based on prior court documents. Note, they have already been found to be unreliable.

When the first risk assessment did not get what was wanted another human interest story was thrown out there with continued grants from the MaCarthur foundation.

What they are seeking is what is called "free bail" decided by a "diagnostic" tool.

Personal bonds "free bail" which do take place are based on a person's criminal history and current charge. It is fantastically funny considering the organizations funding these are crying about what they deem as a cookie cutter approach at the same time they are implementing.......a cookie cutter approach.

I'm not interested in distracted driving.

But, I can address your issue:
On deaths (from overdosing) and has nothing to do with bail:
More people died from drug overdoses in 2014 than in any year on record. The majority of drug overdose deaths (more than six out of ten) involve an opioid.1 And since 1999, the number of overdose deaths involving opioids (including prescription opioid pain relievers and heroin) nearly quadrupled.2 From 2000 to 2014 nearly half a million people died from drug overdoses. 78 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.

We now know that overdoses from prescription opioid pain relievers are a driving factor in the 15-year increase in opioid overdose deaths. Since 1999, the amount of prescription opioids sold in the U.S. nearly quadrupled,2 yet there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.3,4 Deaths from prescription opioids—drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone—have also quadrupled since 1999.5
Understanding the Epidemic | Drug Overdose | CDC Injury Center
  • In 2014, 9,967 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes, accounting for nearly one-third (31%) of all traffic-related deaths in the United States.1
  • Of the 1,070 traffic deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years in 2014, 209 (19%) involved an alcohol-impaired driver.1
  • Of the 209 child passengers ages 14 and younger who died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes in 2014, over half (116) were riding in the vehicle with the alcohol-impaired driver.1
  • In 2014, over 1.1 million drivers were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics.3 That's one percent of the 121 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. adults each year.4
  • Drugs other than alcohol (legal and illegal) are involved in about 16% of motor vehicle crashes.5
  • Marijuana use is increasing6 and 13% of nighttime, weekend drivers have marijuana in their system.7
  • Marijuana users were about 25% more likely to be involved in a crash than drivers with no evidence of marijuana use, however other factors – such as age and gender – may account for the increased crash risk among marijuana users.5
Drivers with prior driving while impaired (DWI) convictions:

  • Drivers with a BAC of 0.08% or higher involved in fatal crashes were seven times more likely to have a prior conviction for DWI than were drivers with no alcohol in their system. (7% and 1%, respectively).1
Paragraph one of your post - I am not interested in your assumptions.

Paragraph two - I have made no comments thus far concerning "risk assessments". However (if you want to go there) judges and prosecutors make risk assessments in considering bail or the amount of bail. There has been at least one case in which a judge was getting kick backs from a bonding company for putting higher bonds than were reasonable. THe reason for this judge sitting a $10,000 bail has not been made clear to me as I haven't taken the time to investigate the case. Have you?

Paragraph 6 - In your later paragraphs you became very interested in the lesser danger of DUIs, but you are not interested in the most deadly form of driving on U.S. highways?

Paragraphs 7, 8 - "78 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose."
How many of those people were jailed instead of given treatment before their demise? What percentage of those people die because their friends - or they themselves - are to afraid to call 911 for fear of going to jail?
Treating the sick with jail sentences will not stop their sickness.

The CDC report - Did you note the "references" at the end of the article? When an agenda needs filled find the references that most closely support that agenda.
 

Buck111

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Cocaine possession and driving under the influence cannot logically be defined as crimes since there is no victim in either instance. Even though the "law" recognizes his actions as crimes, truth is, if there is no victim, there is no crime. Many states have legalized the use of marijuana. Many have not. To use in a have not state is criminal; to use in a have state is not. When laws are inconsistent across the land that says that some of those laws are bullshit and shouldn't exist. Simply because a group of control freaks make something illegal does not make it morally "criminal".

Would you say a child selling lemonade from their own front yard is a criminal offense? Well, many cities have criminalized that act if the child does not have a permit (permission slip). If you decided to have a yard sale and sell everything you own, do you think you should have to give a cut to the city you live in? Well, most cities require yard sale permits that you have to pay to get. Neither you nor the child selling lemonade are harming anybody, but yet "laws"/rules are in place that criminalize your actions if you do not have permission from the city to do as you wish.

BTW, are you aware it is estimated that we each commit up to three felonies each day? That would make us all "criminals" without even knowing it, wouldn't it?
They are crimes. And DUIs or OWIs exist in the two states marijuana was legalized. Cocaine possession is a crime. That's the truth and you just don't like it. It's ok for you not to like it.

The laws are inconsistent because the change needs to occur at the federal level.

And the child selling lemonade doesn't have anything to do with bail. Your argument has nothing to do with bail. It's very emotional and very "feel-y".
Last, first: If a child is ticketed for selling lemonade without a permit and fails to appear in court for that ticket, that child would be arrested. And you are right, that has nothing to do with bail, because juveniles do not get bail.

Are DUIs and cocaine possession morally criminal? No. Just as selling lemonade is not morally criminal. They are laws written for the purpose of extorting and controlling the masses.

$10,000 is excessive for this mans bail. Even if he had priors. But you seem to think it is okay because "he's a criminal."
When do DUIs and cocaine possession become "morally" criminal for you? After they wreck? How about after they drive with their kids in the car? After 28 of them in a row? NNM, not interested in what you morally feel about the situation.

No, it isn't excessive if he had priors. It's based on history such as.......failing to appear, probation violations.

This guys attempts at moral relativism are sad and pathetic.
He's either an old hippy or a twenty something dimwit living in his parents basement.
It's all over the place and I don't think he understands how it works.
"...all over the place"? I replied to your assertions. If my replies are "...all over the place", you led us there. And if you don't think I know how "it works", educate me. Still waiting for you to tell me about your time before the legislature.
 

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