What technology and science did Meso American give this world???

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by Matthew, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    What technology and science did Meso American give this world??? What stood out.

    I'm interested in a good thread aiming to explore the best of meso America. Trying to give them a chance.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012
  2. Meathead
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    Meathead Gold Member

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    The Mayans and Inca were quite accomplished at the time of the Spanish Conquest, but relative to Europe of the Renaissance, their advancements were moderate. So the answer is not much, but they were able to engineer corn from a very small ear to something close to what we use today.
     
  3. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    The Mayan calendar?
    :eusa_shifty:
     
  4. NoNukes
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    NoNukes Gold Member

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    The Aztecs were very advanced in many ways, they are a good read. Years ago I read a historical novel called Aztec, by Gary Jennings that was pretty interesting.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012
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    Unkotare Diamond Member

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    What technology and science have YOU ever given this world?



    I notice you ALWAYS duck simple questions like this, you little bitch.
     
  6. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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  7. Unkotare
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    Unkotare Diamond Member

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    What technology and science have YOU ever given this world?
     
  8. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    Writing tools

    Although the archaeological record does not provide examples, Maya art shows that writing was done with brushes made with animal hair and quills. Codex-style writing was usually done in black ink with red highlights, giving rise to the Aztec name for the Maya territory as the "land of red and black".

    [edit] Scribes and literacy

    Scribes held a prominent position in Maya courts. Maya art often depicts rulers with trappings indicating they were scribes or at least able to write, such as having pen bundles in their headdresses. Additionally, many rulers have been found in conjunction with writing tools such as shell or clay inkpots. Although the number of logograms and syllabic symbols required to fully write the language numbered in the hundreds, literacy was not necessarily widespread beyond the elite classes. Graffiti uncovered in various contexts, including on fired bricks, shows nonsensical attempts to imitate the writing system.


    Mathematics

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Maya.svg

    Maya numerals
    In common with the other Mesoamerican civilizations, the Maya used a base 20 (vigesimal) and base 5 numbering system (see Maya numerals). Also, the preclassic Maya and their neighbors had independently developed the concept of zero by 36 BC. Inscriptions show them on occasion working with sums up to the hundreds of millions and dates so large it would take several lines just to represent it. They produced extremely accurate astronomical observations; their charts of the movements of the moon and planets are equal or superior to those of any other civilization working from naked eye observation.
    Maya civilization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    What's impressive is they had no link to the outside world and still developed this.
     
  9. Skull Pilot
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    Skull Pilot Platinum Member

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    The architectural prowess of the Incas is undisputed.

    When I was traveling in South America I had the chance to see that fact close up. Many buildings built by the invading Europeans stand on Incan stone foundations. The buildings would fall in an earthquake yet the foundations remain solid and after hundreds of years, stones joined with no mortar or cement still have joints so tight a knife blade won't fit.

    The Mayans used the concept of the number zero long before anyone else.
     
  10. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    Astronomy



    Uniquely, there is some evidence to suggest the Maya appear to be the only pre-telescopic civilization to demonstrate knowledge of the Orion Nebula as being fuzzy, i.e. not a stellar pin-point. The information which supports this theory comes from a folk tale that deals with the Orion constellation's area of the sky. Their traditional hearths include in their middle a smudge of glowing fire that corresponds with the Orion Nebula. This is a significant clue to support the idea that the Maya detected a diffuse area of the sky contrary to the pin points of stars before the telescope was invented.[27] Many preclassic sites are oriented with the Pleiades and Eta Draconis, as seen in La Blanca, Ujuxte, Monte Alto, and Takalik Abaj.

    The Maya were very interested in zenial passages, the time when the sun passes directly overhead. The latitude of most of their cities being below the Tropic of Cancer, these zenial passages would occur twice a year equidistant from the solstice. To represent this position of the sun overhead, the Maya had a god named Diving God.[citation needed]

    The Dresden Codex contains the highest concentration of astronomical phenomena observations and calculations of any of the surviving texts (it appears that the data in this codex is primarily or exclusively of an astronomical nature). Examination and analysis of this codex reveals that Venus was the most important astronomical object to the Maya, even more important to them than the sun.


    ---
    The Maya calendar is a system of calendars used in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and in many modern communities in highland Guatemala[1] and in Veracruz, Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico.[2]

    Maya calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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