The US Military on the Front Lines of Rising Seas (2016)

Discussion in 'Environment' started by abu afak, May 4, 2018.

  1. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    Fuck nuclear. Too expensive, too dangerous, too dirty.

    And think of all the CO2 it produces.

    No waste from solar and wind energy.

    No waste? All the turbines sitting idle isn't waste?
     
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  2. abu afak
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    abu afak ALLAH SNACKBAR!

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    Saying people don't care about Climate change is like saying they don't care about Dying.
    The certainly do, but they don't see it as immediate as a Job, etc
    But most states and large organizations are planning for it.
    Virtually every Coastal state has plans in place, as well as our Military.

    Climate change threatens half of US bases worldwide, Pentagon report finds
    • Defense department says wild weather could endanger 1,700 sites
    • Findings run counter to White House views on climate
    Nearly half of US military sites are threatened by wild weather linked to climate change, according to a new Pentagon study whose findings run contrary to White House views on global warming.

    Drought, wind and flooding that occurs due to reasons other than storms topped the list of natural disasters that endanger 1,700 military sites worldwide, from large bases to outposts, said the US Department of Defense (DoD).

    “Changes in climate can potentially shape the environment in which we operate and the missions we are required to do,” said the DoD in a report accompanying the survey.

    “If extreme weather makes our critical facilities unusable or necessitates costly or manpower-intensive workarounds, that is an unacceptable impact.”

    The findings put the military at odds with Donald Trump, who has repeatedly cast doubt on mainstream scientific findings about climate change, including this week during an interview on British television.

    Trump has also pulled the United States out of the global 2015 Paris accord to fight climate change.

    The Pentagon survey investigated the effects of “a changing climate” on all US military installations worldwide, which it said numbered more than 3,500.

    Assets most often damaged include airfields, energy infrastructure and water systems, according to military personnel at each site, who responded to the DoD questionnaire.

    John Conger, a senior policy analyst at the Center for Climate and Security in Washington, said the report’s commissioning by Congress showed a growing interest by lawmakers into the risks that climate change poses to national security.

    The study was published late last week and brought to public attention this week by the Center for Climate and Security.
    - end-
     
  3. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    “Changes in climate can potentially shape the environment in which we operate and the missions we are required to do,” said the DoD in a report accompanying the survey.
    The findings put the military at odds with Donald Trump, who has repeatedly cast doubt on mainstream scientific findings about climate change, including this week during an interview on British television."

    Ridiculous! Obama was at odds with the military and ordered it (Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013) to comply, declaring climate change a "national security threat".....while Iran and North Korea were going nuclear, China and Russia were upgrading their armaments and he decimated the US military readiness.
    So let`s see who was at odds with the military shall we?
    The Obama era is over. Here's how the military rates his legacy
    More than half of troops surveyed in the latest Military Times/Institute for Veterans and Military Families poll said they have an unfavorable opinion of Obama and his two-terms leading the military
    Their complaints include the president’s decision to decrease military personnel (71 percent think it should be higher), his moves to withdraw combat troops from Iraq (59 percent say it made America less safe) and his lack of focus on the biggest dangers facing America (64 percent say China represents a significant threat to the U.S.)



     
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  4. abu afak
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    abu afak ALLAH SNACKBAR!

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    TRUMP AND THE MILITARY ARE AT ODDS ON CLIMATE CHANGE
    SEAN MOWBRAY
    JAN 18, 2018
    Trump and the Military Are at Odds on Climate Change

    While the Trump administration has largely rejected climate change as an issue, the Department of Defense and Congress have identified it as a major potential threat to national security. The United States government appears to be of two minds, with utterly opposing worldviews, on climate change policy.

    On one hand, the Trump administration has pulled out of the Paris Climate Agreement, proposed eliminating three vital new climate satellites, reneged on an Obama-era $2 billion commitment to the Green Climate Fund, and wants to slash funding to the Environmental Protection Agency's domestic climate programs and the Department of State's USAID climate programs around the globe. The president has also denounced global warming as a Hoax and a Chinese plot.

    On the other hand, the Republican-dominated Congress has affirmed that climate change is a prominent national security threat and mandated that the Department of Defense (DOD) look closely at how climate change is going to affect key installations, while also addressing the need to boost the military's finances considerably to deal with global warming threats. When Trump's national security strategy—announced in January—erased climate change as a threat to U.S. security, that decision drew the ire of a bipartisan group of congressional legislators.

    As a result of this dichotomy, the DOD has emerged as an unlikely champion of climate action in the Trump government, with the Pentagon declaring emphatically that a Rapidly warming world is bringing with it Alarming security risks ranging from rising sea level (which threatens naval bases such as Norfolk, Virginia, the largest in the world), to the "mother of all risks"—unpredictable and worsening political instability around the globe brought by climate chaos.
    [.....]

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    Last edited: Aug 15, 2018
  5. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    "When Trump's national security strategy—announced in January—erased climate change as a threat to U.S. security, that decision drew the ire of a bipartisan group of congressional legislators."
    106 of them wrote a letter.Wow 106 out of 535 that`s not even 20% who think climate change is a threat. That`s is even less than the other polls you brandished .

    And then :
    "the DOD has emerged as an unlikely champion of climate action in the Trump government, with the Pentagon declaring emphatically that a Rapidly warming world is bringing with it Alarming security risks ranging from rising sea level"
    That`s a copy&paste from the same old crap you used to start this thread because the Pentagon has made no such a declaration, in fact they came to this conclusion:
    The Pentagon erases ‘climate change’ from report drafted during Obama administration
    The Pentagon erases ‘climate change’ from report drafted during Obama administration
    The final version of the reported eliminated any mention of storms become 'more destructive' due to climate change


    A final version was presented to Congress in January 2018 without the draft’s 23 references to “climate change,” leaving just one mention of the phrase.

    And the Washington Post:
    Pentagon survey details effects of climate change on military sites
    "The idea was to try and figure out . . . how climate effects were impacting the installations and in what way," said John Conger, who served as a senior Pentagon official under the Obama administration and was among the officials who initiated the survey.
    Officials suspected that flooding was taking a toll on coastal installations such as Naval Station Norfolk, and that drought and wildfire were affecting inland facilities. But they needed reporting from those locations to have a clear nationwide picture.
    According to the survey, which was rolled out to military sites in 2014, the most frequent problems named were drought, wind and non-storm-surge-related flooding. Nearly half of the sites reported no impact.

    Besides yourself who are you trying to convince here? It`s not even a challenge to debunk the crap you post 24/7.



     
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  6. abu afak
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    abu afak ALLAH SNACKBAR!

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    October 02, 2018
    The U.S. Defense Department Is Losing the Battle Against Climate Change
    Underfunding, lack of strategic planning and denialism are hindering the DoD’s climate response
    by Daniel Ross
    The U.S. Defense Department Is Losing the Battle Against Climate Change

    [​IMG]
    Indeed, climate change has long been on the military’s radar. (Photo: Sgt. Jerry Rushing / Dept of Defense)

    A rock seawall protecting the Air Force’s Cape Lisburne Long Range Radar Station on the North East Alaska coast is under increasing duress from extreme weather patterns affecting Arctic sea ice. early $50 million has been spent replacing vulnerable parts of the wall already.

    In 2013, a late summer monsoon rainstorm struck Fort Irwin, in California, flooding more than 160 buildings and causing extensive damage that took weeks to clean up. Some buildings were out of commission for months.

    The 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, one of the most destructive wildfires in Colorado’s history, only narrowly missed Peterson Air Force Base. The fire cost some $16 millionto battle.

    These are just some of the findings that make up a US Department of Defense vulnerability report, published earlier this year, looking at the impact of climate change on more than 3,500 military installations. Its conclusion? That more than half of these installations are affected by flooding, drought, winds, wildfires, storm surges and extreme temperatures. Drought proved the single biggest challenge to the military, affecting nearly 800 bases. Next up was wind, which affected more than 750 bases, while non-storm surge-related flooding impacted a little more than 700 bases.

    “As an institution, the military sees climate change as a threat to what they do on multiple levels,” said Michael Klare, professor emeritus of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College. “It’s a threat to their bases. It’s a threat to their operations. It creates insurgencies. It creates problems for them. They’re aware of that, and they want to minimize those impediments.”

    Indeed, climate change has long been on the military’s radar. It was the George W. Bush administration, for example, that required the Defense Department to procure 25 percent of its energy for its buildings from renewables by 2025. Even President Ronald Reagan received military memos warning of global warming. While in 2014, the department published a roadmap establishing an outline to deal with the threats from climate change within the military, as ordered by then-President Barack Obama.

    Although President Trump’s administration is known for its climate change denialism, major figures within the military are still noticeably vocal about the issue. In February, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats warned in a Worldwide Threat Assessmentthat the impacts from global warming—more air pollution, biodiversity loss and water scarcity—are “likely to fuel economic and social discontent—and possibly upheaval—through 2018.” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has been called the “lone green hope” for his long-established views on the threat of global warming.

    Given the immediate threat of rising sea levels, the US Navy is leading the charge to better understand these impacts at the ground level. Last year, a Navy handbookprovided a planning framework for incorporating the threat of climate change into development projects at Navy installations. To put this into context, a 2016 Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) analysis of 18 military installations along the US East coast and the Gulf of Mexico found that by 2050, most of these bases will experience 10 times the number of floods than they do currently
    [......]
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    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018
  7. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    News are fake news if you write an article "The U.S. Defense Department Is Losing the Battle Against Climate Change" and use a picture from another article published on March 14 2016
    2016 Year in Photos
    and change the caption from
    Traffic Sign Army Sgt. David Breaud directs a high-water vehicle down a flooded road at Latt Lake in Grant Parish, La., March 13, 2016. Breaud is assigned to the Louisiana National Guard’s Headquarters Company, 225th Engineer Brigade. Louisiana Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Jerry Rushing"


    To :
    Indeed, climate change has long been on the military’s radar. (Photo: Sgt. Jerry Rushing / Dept of Defense)

    In order to elevate that scene where a national guard traffic sign Sgt is directing a high water vehicle to a "Department of Defense losing the battle against climate change".
    That`s what fake news op-eds do, scour the internet for material and events several years ago and rewrite it as "news" while plagiarizing whatever they need and then insert it into the crap they publish for their internet forum socks to post in a forum, on Twitter or facebook.
    If Jerry Rushing sees this he can now rewrite his resumes from being a Louisiana National Guard to reflect his new status, an official of the Department of defense.
     
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    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018

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