The next catastrophe?

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Old Rocks, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    The Gulf of Mexico is currently reeling from the human and environmental tragedy unfolding after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon, an offshore oil platform. The Horizon, operated by BP, exploded on April 20, 2010, killing 11 workers, injuring many others and spilling millions of gallons of oil into the ocean.

    While the cause of the Horizon explosion is being investigated, it is important to note that BP has a devastating history of accidents and evading government oversight. Worse yet, an even bigger tragedy in the Gulf could be looming. An internal BP email admits that a “catastrophic” accident is possible at another one of its platforms, the BP Atlantis. An accident at this platform could result in a spill that is many times larger than the one currently unfolding from the Deepwater Horizon.


    BP?s Atlantis: Another Catastrophic Accident Waiting to Happen? Spill the Truth
    BP Atlantis poses a serious, immediate and potentially irreparable threat to the Gulf of Mexico’s marine environment, oil workers and communities. BP’s Atlantis platform became active during the Bush administration in October of 2007. Located in “Hurricane Alley,” more than 150 miles from New Orleans at a water depth of more than 7,000 feet, it is one of the deepest moored semisubmersible oil and gas platforms in the world. In August of 2008, a BP contractor made a startling discovery about Atlantis: The company was operating the massive Atlantis platform without proper up-to-date and engineer-approved documentation. Some of the problems included:

    More than 6,000 critical documents — including those for pipelines, flowlines, wellheads and other important systems — did not have the required engineering documentation.
    Over 85 percent of the project’s subsea piping and instrument diagrams, critical documents for operating the platform, were not approved by engineers.
    Many of its safety shutdown system logic diagrams were not up to date.
    Over 95 percent of its subsea welding documents had no final engineering approval, calling into question the safety of the welds.
     
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  2. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    If Obama had balls he would step up and nuke the hole, that is the best way to seal it, and we already know it works. But keep blaming all of this on BP, it makes you feel intelligent.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Nuke the oil? And if it did not seal the hole? After all, while that worked most of the time, it did not in at least one case. And if it did not work, what then?:cuckoo:
     
  4. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    The reason it did not is that the geological studies done at the time were inadequate. Regardless, something that has an 80% track record should be on the table, but your hero took it off before anyone had a serious chance to discuss it. Can you point to anything else that has a comparable success rate?
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Would you get on an airplane that had a 80% chance of a successful landing?
     
  6. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    No, but I would prefer to jump out of a plane in a parachute with an 80% chance of survival than continue to cling to my seat as the plane crashes. If you want to make metaphors that work you should consider all the implications. The plane is already crashing, it is to late to not get on.
     
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  7. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    Now you're thinking Einstein, that's the best way to solve the New Orleans fiasco created by Katrina...a radioactive tsunami.
     
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  8. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    You're right, turning the Gulf into a giant oil slick is so much much better.
     
  9. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Just nuke anything that does not suit us.
     
  10. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    Has it ever been done before? How much time would it take to drill a hole to place the nuclear device? Less than the time drilling the relief well? What are the chances the nuclear explosion might ignite a chain reaction of methane hydrate eruptions, or in layman's terms, end life on this planet?
     

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