The National Health Service is turning 70 on 5 July 2018

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by barryqwalsh, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. barryqwalsh
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    barryqwalsh Gold Member

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    Help us celebrate the 70th birthday of the NHS!

    The National Health Service is turning 70 on 5 July 2018. It’s the perfect opportunity to celebrate the achievements of one of the nation’s most loved institutions, to appreciate the vital role the service plays in our lives, and to recognise and thank the extraordinary NHS staff – the everyday heroes – who are there to guide, support and care for us, day in, day out.


    Find out more about the NHS at 70
    Explore the NHS of the past and future or catch up on today’s latest news from the NHS 70 celebrations below:


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  2. frigidweirdo
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    frigidweirdo Platinum Member

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    And costs less per capita than the US govt spends on healthcare.

    Imagine what it would be like if everyone paid 10% rather than 8%.
     
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  3. barryqwalsh
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    barryqwalsh Gold Member

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    BBC Radio 4 - The Moral Maze


    The NHS at 70

    The Prime Minister Theresa May has announced a 70th birthday 'present' for the NHS: an extra £20bn a year by 2023, paid for in part by tax rises. It has been received with cries of 'about time' and 'notenough.' Other voices mutter that we are simply pouring good money after bad into a system that is broken. To go with the funding boost, the government has promised a 10-year plan that "tackles waste, reduces bureaucracy and eliminates unacceptable variation," but sceptics say we've seen those promises before. With an ever-aging population and increasing pressures on the system, is it time for a fundamental re-appraisal of the NHS's priorities? What is it actually for? Is the job of the NHS to help us when we get sick, or to keep us from getting sick in the first place? Do expensive treatments need to be rationed, and if so, how should we decide who gets them? The sickest, the youngest, the ones with the best chance of recovery or the ones who can't afford to go private? The mantra of 'free at the point of delivery' embodies a fundamental moral principle that makes the NHS the envy of the world, according to many. Others believe it has turned our healthcare system into a religion - and delivered worse health outcomes than different systems in comparable countries. Ultimately, is it fair to ask those who look after their own health to pay for the treatment of those who don't?



    AUDIO
    BBC Radio 4 - Moral Maze, The NHS at 70
     
  4. dblack
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    dblack Gold Member

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    I bet prisons are a bargain too. How much, per capita, do we spend on health care for prison inmates?
     

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