R.I.P. Vernon Baker

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by del, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. del
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    del BANNED

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    thank you

    NEW YORK — Vernon Baker, the only living black veteran awarded the Medal of Honor for valor in World War II, receiving it 52 years after he wiped out four German machine gun nests on a hilltop in northern Italy, died Tuesday at his home near St. Maries, Idaho. He was 90.

    The cause was complications of brain cancer, said Ron Hodge, owner of the Hodge Funeral Home in St. Maries.

    “I was a soldier and I had a job to do,’’ Mr. Baker said after receiving the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for bravery, from President Clinton in a White House ceremony on Jan. 13, 1997.

    But in the segregated armed forces of World War II, black soldiers were usually confined to jobs in manual labor or supply units. Even when the Army allowed blacks to go into combat, it rarely accorded them the recognition they deserved. Of the 433 Medals of Honor awarded by all branches of the military during the war, not a single one went to any of the 1.2 million African-Americans in the service.

    Vernon Baker, 90; Medal of Honor recipient for WWII heroism - The Boston Globe
     
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  2. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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  3. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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    I had the news off all day.

    “I was a soldier and I had a job to do,’’ Mr. Baker said after receiving the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for bravery, from President Clinton in a White House ceremony on Jan. 13, 1997.


    thank you for posting this.

    [youtube]38wx8C7VmB4[/youtube]
     
  4. Modbert
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    Modbert Daydream Believer Supporting Member

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    Thanks for posting this Del.
     
  5. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    I saw him here when he did a veterans event a few years ago. St Maries is only about two hours from here, and I guess they will be having a memorial service for him there.. Everyone in town spoke about how they are very proud he was from St Maries. I will find a clip from the local news station.
     
  6. Luissa
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  7. random3434
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    random3434 Senior Member

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    Wow, I didn't know that until I just read this!

    Thank you, President Clinton, for honoring this hero!

    And thank you, Vernon Baker, for your service!


    God Bless!
     
  8. Foxfyre
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    Foxfyre Eternal optimist Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    It is stories like this that are heart warming and make you proud, but at the same time are so frustrating because we so often can't undo injustice that has already been done. Nobody can give back Vernon Baker the pride and meaningfulness that Medal of Honor would have held for him had it been awarded as it should have been.

    It should be a lesson to us not to delay thanking those in our lives and who give of themselves on our behalf and who deserve thanks. We shouldn't wait to praise those who deserve praise or rewarding those who have earned reward or acknowledging those who have accomplished great things or contributed great service. If we wait, we might lose the opportunity.

    There is more to the Vernon Baker story:

     

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