Ordinary people as mystics and saints

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by Sky Dancer, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. Sky Dancer
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    I thought we might share stories of people whose lives were inspired. Here's one I found by accident:


    John Brian McDonnell was what one friend called a "spiritual busybody": someone who could not help but intervene in a world that saddened him with its injustices.

    A former Jesuit seminarian, he entered history as the young pacifist who fasted for 37 days across the street from the White House to protest the U.S. incursion into Cambodia during the Vietnam War. The fast launched him into an unlikely but long-lasting friendship with then-National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger, who wrote of McDonnell in his memoirs and mentioned him again years later at President Nixon's funeral......

    More at the link

    John McDonnell, 60; Antiwar Activist, 'Spiritual Busybody' - Los Angeles Times
     
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    A Saint is merely a disciple of Christ. Christian is the term used by the non-Christians to describe them. Throughout the scriptures, the believers are called Saints.

    During the middle ages things changed. I am not particularly fond of the dark ages.
     
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    (July 18, 1908 – July 7, 1981) born Mildred Lisette Norman, was an American pacifist, vegetarian, and peace activist. In 1952, she became the first woman to walk the entire length of the Appalachian Trail in one season. Starting on January 1, 1953, in Pasadena, California, she adopted the name "Peace Pilgrim" and walked across the United States for 28 years.

    Her pilgrimage spanned almost three decades beginning January 1, 1953, in Pasadena, California. The Korean War was in progress. She continued walking for 28 years, spanning the American involvement in the Vietnam War and beyond. Peace Pilgrim was a frequent speaker at churches, universities, and local and national radio and television.

    Expressing her ideas about peace, she referred to herself only as "Peace Pilgrim." Peace Pilgrim's only possessions were the clothes on her back and the few items she carried in the pockets of her blue tunic which read "Peace Pilgrim" on the front and "25,000 Miles on foot for peace" on the back. She had no organizational backing, carried no money, and would not even ask for food or shelter. When she began her pilgrimage she had taken a vow to "remain a wanderer until mankind has learned the way of peace, walking until given shelter and fasting until given food."
    Peace Pilgrim - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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