New Orleans hurricane

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Warrior102, Aug 29, 2012.

  1. Warrior102
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    Warrior102 Gold Member

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    Will there be riots?
    My guess Is yes
    Any takers?
     
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  2. Full-Auto
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    Full-Auto Gold Member

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    The images of Sean Penn dragging a sunken rubber raft with a 12 gauge was priceless.

    Probably not though, A few looters were shot by locals. I am sure they would do it again.........
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Rioting during a hurricane. What a hell of an idea!
     
  4. Warrior102
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    Warrior102 Gold Member

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    Didn't stop em last time, assfucker
     
  5. Moonglow
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    Why not? Warrior would loot if he were there and not disabled.
     
  6. High_Gravity
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    High_Gravity Belligerent Drunk Supporting Member

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    Nah I don't think so.
     
  7. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    No, and there weren't any during or after Katrina.
     
  8. Warrior102
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    Warrior102 Gold Member

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    Dear, I love you, but seriously.....
     
  9. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    What riots are you talking about?
     
  10. Warrior102
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    Warrior102 Gold Member

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    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, looting, violence and other criminal activity became serious problems. With most of the attention of the authorities focused on rescue efforts, public security in New Orleans degraded quickly. By August 30, looting had spread throughout the city, often in broad daylight and in the presence of police officers.
    "The looting is out of control. The French Quarter has been attacked," City Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson said. "We're using exhausted, scarce police to control looting when they should be used for search and rescue while we still have people on rooftops."[42]
    Incapacitated by the breakdown of transportation and communication, as well as overwhelmed numerically, police officers could do little to stop crime, and shopkeepers who remained behind were left to defend their property alone.[43] Looters included gangs of gunmen,[44] and gunfire was heard in parts of the city. Along with violent, armed robbery of non-essential valuable goods,[45] many incidents were of residents simply taking food, water, and other commodities from unstaffed grocery stores.[45] There were also reports of some police officers looting.[44] Significant looting continued in areas of the city with few, if any permanent residents, such as the Lakeview, Gentilly, and the Midcity regions.[46]
    "Sniper fire" was also reported throughout the city, targeted at rescue helicopters, relief workers, and police officers.
    Looting and "mayhem" was also hampering efforts to evacuate the Tulane Medical Center, as well. "If we do not have the federal presence in New Orleans tonight at dark, it will no longer be safe to be there, hospital or no hospital,"[47] Acadian Ambulance Services C.E.O. Richard Zuschlag told CNN on August 31. Several news sources reported instances of fighting, drug use, theft, rape, and murder in the Superdome and other refuge centers.[48]
    Some initial reports of mass chaos, particularly in stories about the Superdome, were later found to be exaggerated or rumor.[46] In the Superdome for example, the New Orleans sex crimes unit investigated every report of rape or atrocity and found only two verifiable incidents, both of sexual assault. The department head told reporters, "I think it was urban myth. Any time you put 25,000 people under one roof, with no running water, no electricity and no information, stories get told." Based on these reports, government officials expected hundreds of dead to be found in the Superdome, but instead found only 6 dead (of which there were 4 natural deaths, one drug overdose and one suicide).[49][50] In a case of reported sniper fire, the "sniper" turned out to be the relief valve of a gas tank popping every few minutes.[46]
    At the time of the hurricane there were some 400 priests and 750 nuns in the Archdiocese of New Orleans, many stationed in the city. While most elderly and infirm clergy and nuns were evacuated, many others refused to leave, even when a general evacuation was ordered.


    A Lincoln Town Car disabled by the flooding from Katrina.
    Additional acts of unrest occurred following the storm, particularly with the New Orleans Police Department. In the aftermath, a tourist asked a police officer for assistance, and got the response, "Go to hell, it's every man for himself."[51] Also, one-third of New Orleans police officers deserted the city in the days before the storm, many of them escaping in their department-owned patrol cars. This added to the chaos by stretching law enforcement thin.[52] Additionally, several NOPD officers were arrested weeks after Katrina for suspicion of vehicle theft.[53]
     

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