Most popular dance tunes that Influenced what we listen to.

Discussion in 'Music' started by LittleNipper, Jun 22, 2018.

  1. LittleNipper
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    LittleNipper VIP Member

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    Beginning in 1920 a band leader named Paul Whiteman had a series of hits starting with his VICTOR RECORD release of WHISPERING, an eleven-week U.S. No. 1 hit, which remained 20 weeks in the charts and sold in excess of 2,000.000 copies. This tune would be recorded 100's of times and would hit the charts again in the early 1960's twice.



    Another was WANG WANG BLUES of the same year. Paul Whiteman would remain popular throughout the decade.

    There is no saying that Whiteman was not a innovator. He was not limited to a particular "sound," and he certainly promoted variety --- as this hit also of 1920 will testify.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
  2. LittleNipper
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    1921 was another banner year for Paul Whiteman. Say It With Music became another hit. These are lyrics to Irving Berlin's tune.

    [1st verse:]
    Music is a language lovers understand
    Melody and romance wander hand in hand
    Cupid never fails assisted by a band
    So if you have something sweet to tell her

    [Refrain:]
    Say it with music
    Beautiful music

    Somehow they'd rather be kissed
    To the strains of Chopin or Liszt

    A melody mellow
    Played on a cello

    Helps mister Cupid along
    So say it with a beautiful song

    [2nd verse:]
    There's a tender message deep down in my heart
    Something you should know, but how am I to start?
    Sentimental speeches never could impart
    Just exactly what I want to tell you
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
  3. LittleNipper
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    It was Paul Whiteman again in 1922 with STUMBLING (Fox Trot). Paul Whiteman was accused of trying to make a "Lady" out of Jazz. However, what Whiteman achieved were consistent performances and a refinement of sound. He was often the first exposure to jazz that many people of that day happened upon. He certainly became a millionaire and sold record after record. You must also consider the FACT that all these early recordings had to be recorded in one cut. If a mistake was made, the recording was ruined and a retake was necessary. So, only musicians who gave consistent perfect performances were retained... Yes, they did practice and tial takes might be recorded to finetune an arrangement. But multitracks and dubbing were still decades away.

    We also have the tune "CHICAGO". Here are 3 renditions from that year --- Paul Whiteman is first.

    The Georgians version is next.
    Finally we have the Bar Harbor Society version.

    The Fox Trot has remained popular since its inception.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
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    Yes! We Have No Bananas is a novelty song by Frank Silver and Irving Cohn published July 19, 1923. It became a major hit in 1923 (placing No. 1 for five weeks)


    And there is also a tune surrounding a popular comic strip character of that day!
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
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    1924 marks the end of an era. Acoustical recording was about to be replaced with ELECTRICAL recording. The playback would continue to be acoustic; however, there was a change there also with Orthophonic machines which boasted a 9 foot horn which was folded inside the cabinet and a delicate aluminum diaphragm.
    The big hit of 1924 was It Had to be You, which remains a standard to this day.


    And also THE CHARLESTON also acoustically recorded.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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    1925 we have YES SIR, THAT's MY BABY sung by Gene Austin Who says our great grandparents didn't have fun! Ukulele and Skatting besides!

    Then there was also the college crowd
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
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    To put this into some perspective, it must be realized that Hugh Beaumont (who played Ward Cleaver on Leave it to Beaver -- the stauch family man) would turned 17 years old in 1926 and June (Barbara Billingsley) his wife would have been barely 10.
     
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    The Ziegfeld Follies of 1927 would have Eddie Cantor introduce another standard. Paul Whiteman would have a #1 hit of it in December of that year and Gene Austin would continue by making it a hit in '28. Here is Paul Whitman's version. Note the VE at the top of the "scroll" Victor label. This means that this is a VICTOR ELECTRIC recording & and an Orthophonic one at that! Here is MY BLUE HEAVEN

    We also have VARSITY DRAG from a mostly forgotten Broadway Musical GOOD NEWS!
    Following is a rare Talky "Short" from 1927. Talking pictures had existed for sometime but not as full length features. The Jazz Singer would end this and talking pictures would become all the rage. It could be regarded that the electric recording process made talking pictures more likely convenient.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018

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