Longest Running Experiment of Evolution Hits a Dead End

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Weatherman2020, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. Weatherman2020
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    Weatherman2020 Educating Libs Since 1978

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    Last edited: Jun 13, 2018
  2. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    Unfortunately, that article a fatal misunderstanding of how evolution functions.

    Genetic mutation doesn't happen to adapt fitness to the environment. Genetic mutations are unrelated to the suitability of the organism to survive. Genes have no way of perceiving the requirements of survival in the environment. Genetic mutations are spontaneous and random and are mostly inconsequential to the organism, frequently harmful, and only occasionally useful in adaptability to the environment. When a mutation is useful, that increases the likelihood of it being passed on to future generations.

    The experiment proves that organisms mutate and that those mutations are passed on. It would be highly unlikely for a major adaptive change to occur -- particularly in the closed and controlled environment of the experiment -- in as few as 70,000 generations. Human evolution happened over 85 million years or 6.5 million generations.
     
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  3. Weatherman2020
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    Weatherman2020 Educating Libs Since 1978

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    You mean the experiment doesn't understand evolution. The article simply reported on the longest running experiment on evolution ending in failure.

    And no, mutations are not beneficial to any organism.

    And as I posted in another thread, DNA research shows humans, apes, aardvarks, etc all appeared at the same time, less than 200K years ago according to their timescale.
     
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  4. Wuwei
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    Wuwei Gold Member

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    That's a very interesting study. It is well known that viruses can inject their own DNA into a host. It is also well known that viruses have been seen to mutate many times over the course of decades. Fast mutating viruses would add a more realistic real world dimension to the experiment, rather than using the sterile concoction of glucose and citrate as an environment.

    Viruses may be the foundation for mutations and probably would have lead to evolutionary changes if added to Richard Lenski's flasks.
     
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  5. Weatherman2020
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    Weatherman2020 Educating Libs Since 1978

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    When a virus mutates it only changes shape to keep the immune system from killing it.
     
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  6. LuckyDuck
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    LuckyDuck Gold Member

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    Hate to break it to you, but you will find a good example of evolution changing a species in a short time if you check out the physical changes that have occurred with the "fence lizard" which when exposed to fire ants, over a short period, changed their legs and body habits.
    Also, one need only look at the evolution of the horse.
     
  7. Weatherman2020
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    Weatherman2020 Educating Libs Since 1978

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    Making a Goldendoodle dog does not mean any species has been transformed into another.

    As I posted in another thread, DNA shows a clear distinction between all species.
     
  8. Syriusly
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    Syriusly Diamond Member

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    LOL- the dead giveaway in the article- is this quote:

    Despite a flood of challenges since the publication of The Origin of Species, the scientific evidence found in nature is increasingly best explainable by the Genesis record written by Moses.

    With absolutely nothing to support that conclusion

    LOL
     
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  9. Weatherman2020
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    Weatherman2020 Educating Libs Since 1978

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    Dead giveaway is this study ended in a dead end unable to show evolution and the DNA study showing man and apes and almost every animal appeared at the same time and have clear divisions in DNA.
     
  10. Syriusly
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    Inside Dr. Richard Lenski’s Ambitious, 30-Year Experiment

    About 31,000 generations later, 11 of 12 strains still relied solely on glucose for energy to reproduce, but one strain developed the ability to eat citrate too. Consequently, these citrate-using bacteria were able to grow much better in the glucose-poor/citrate-rich media than their 11 sibling strains. Ta da! Evolution happened right there on the bench-top, and simply opening a freezer door could reveal exactly when and how these changes took place. Using their handy frozen fossil record, researchers revived ancestors in the lineage that gave rise to citrate-eating bacteria and showed the steps that needed to happen for this new trait to come about.

    So, where do these new traits come from? Lenski’s E. coli research supports the idea that new traits arise from just the right combinations of random genetic changes that, while extremely rare, do happen given enough time. Some DNA mutations don’t cause any obvious change to an organism at all. Other mutations are incredibly harmful, like the mutations in the human BRCA1 gene that make some people susceptible to breast cancer. But once in a very long while, beneficial genetic changes occur that make an organism fitter, happier, more productive… each new generation has a chance to explore new improvements.
     
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