Limiting Your Options!!

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Navy1960, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. Navy1960
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    Navy1960 Senior Member

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    The review is shaping up to be a major showdown for Obama this year. It is taking on some of the most sacred cows of the nuclear program. For the first time, influential voices, including a former top nuclear commander and senior Obama advisers, are proposing that one leg of the nuclear arms “triad’’ - a $30 billion-a-year enterprise made up of land-, air-, and sea-based weapons - be eliminated.

    Obama presses review of nuclear strategy - The Boston Globe


    The Russian prime minister threatened to scupper one of Mr Obama's key foreign policy successes following his initial agreement with President Dmitry Medvedev at the G20 summit in London in April.

    In a notable toughening of rhetoric, Mr Putin insisted his country would develop new "offensive" weapons systems before it considered cutting nuclear warheads. He said the new weapons were necessary to prevent America's leaders from thinking they can "do whatever they want".

    Vladimir Putin threatens Barack Obama's nuclear stockpile cuts - Telegraph

    Col. Gen. Nikolai Solovtsov said Russia is developing a new ICBM comparable to the SS-18, and would gradually decommission older versions of the missile "in order to ensure nuclear safety".

    The missile is armed with a warhead fitting 10 multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicles (MIRVs) with a yield of 550 to 750 kilotons each. It has a maximum range of 11,000 km with a launch mass of over 210 tons and a payload of 8.8 tons.
    Russia test fires ICBM missile - Rest of World - World - The Times of India

    President Obama dismayed America's allies in Europe and angered his political opponents at home today when he formally ditched plans to set up a missile defence shield in Poland and the Czech Republic.

    The project had been close to the heart of Mr Obama's predecessor, President Bush, who had argued before leaving office in January that it was needed to defend against long-range ballistic missile attacks from rogue states such as Iran and North Korea.

    But it had hobbled relations with Russia, which considered it both a security threat and an unnecessary political provocation in its own backyard.
    Dismay in Europe as Obama ditches missile defence - Times Online

    While trying to balance the need for defense with trying to reduce the number of nuclear weapons, it seems to make little sense when your nation is engaged in two wars, with one winding down and the the nation you intended to bargin with showing no signs of doing the same to reduce your options.
     

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