I just don't understand

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by Merlin1047, Jan 13, 2005.

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  1. Merlin1047
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    Merlin1047 Senior Member

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    I do get rather tired of militant atheists who seem to have something akin to evangelical zeal in their insistence that we all should be atheists. What is it about prayer or a belief in God that these people find so offensive that any mention of either in a public forum sends them into a frenzy?

    Apparently they do not understand the Constitution. It stipulates that the state may not establish a religion. It does not in any way prohibit the practice of religion by elected officials within government.

    So here is the saga of another atheist crusader who want to banish prayer from the public arena and in the process is only succeeding in making a total ass of himself.
    ================================================


    http://www.alliancedefensefund.org/news/default.aspx?mid=800&cid=3291

    Constitution says Amen to option of prayer at inaugurations

    Newdow suit aimed at halting prayer at President Bush’s inauguration baseless

    Wednesday, January 12, 2005, 4:39 PM (MST)

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.—History as well as legal precedent clearly show that prayer at Presidential inaugurations is not unconstitutional, according to constitutional law experts at the Alliance Defense Fund.

    The analysis comes on the eve of a hearing scheduled in atheist Michael Newdow’s federal lawsuit attempting to prevent President Bush from having a minister deliver an invocation at his inaugural ceremony Jan. 20.

    “The Framers of the Constitution and the First Amendment engaged in prayer at official governmental ceremonies,” said ADF Senior Counsel Jordan Lorence. “George Washington was inaugurated our first president several months before the First Amendment became part of the Constitution, yet he talked about God in his first inaugural address, placed his hands on a Bible, added ‘so help me God’ to the presidential oath of office, and attended worship services as part of the inaugural activities.”

    Lorence added that the First Congress, three days after approving the First Amendment, approved a paid chaplain to pray before each session of Congress. “Clearly, the Framers saw prayer as an integral part of government functions,” Lorence said.

    Lorence also pointed out that the government does not force anyone to view or participate in the inaugural events. “People know what they are going to see at the Inauguration, so it should come as no surprise that someone will pray. Americans understand that throughout our nation’s history, new presidents want to ask for God’s help and guidance for our nation.”

    Even though Americans differ in their religious beliefs, Lorence explained, they can unite at an inauguration around prayer. “We agree with Samuel Adams, who said that we can ‘hear a prayer from a gentleman of piety and virtue, who was at the same time a friend of his country.’”

    Lorence expects Newdow or President Bush to appeal any adverse rulings to them on an emergency basis to the federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., or to the U.S. Supreme Court before the Inauguration takes place at noon on Jan. 20.
     
  2. Shattered
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    It's not offensive in "general".. What's offensive is when Christians start attacking you, stating that you're going to hell because you don't believe what they believe, insisting you need to be "saved", etc. A good example is when I'm at work, and a customer feels the need to pass me one of her brochures prior to walking about the door, while stating "Here's a bit of information I think you can use." Christ, woman. I'm fucking at work. Keep your god damned religion in your house, and in your heart. I don't feel it necessary to point out my religious standing to others - I feel comfortable with it inside - that's all that matters. Not all Christians behave in a "zealot-like" manner, but there are enough that do to give the majority of Christians in general a bad name.
     
  3. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    not say'n that you do this, but I find it funny that most Atheists don't want Christians to promote impose their beliefs on them, yet Atheists impose their beliefs on Christians every day.
     
  4. Shattered
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    No, I don't do it.. Like I said.. I'm comfortable inside with what I believe (or don't believe).. But..have the common courtesy to leave your religion out of my workplace, and off of my car. Go to church..celebrate your special holidays..believe what you want to believe.. But why bother me at work, and why stick your "propaganda" to my car? Respect each persons personal space.

    You don't see me ripping religious bumper stickers off your car.. Don't go adding things TO my car.
     
  5. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    I would stop somebody from doing that to another's vehicle. People who do things like that give the religious a bad name. Kind of like those idiots with signs at Matthew Sheppard's funeral.
     
  6. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    you don't do it, but there are others that do. that is all I am getting at. It is a two way street. there are radical atheists just like there are radical followers of religions.
     
  7. Shattered
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    I suppose my thinking is...if I have the common courtesy to not do it to you, don't do it to me..
     
  8. freeandfun1
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    I think that is the common courtesy of many. Like I said, there are radical atheists too. Just keeping things in perspective. To deny that there are is... well, blind.
     
  9. Shattered
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    Oh, I know there are radicals on both sides...but neither side seems all too willing to admit that.. It's always a "Why are they all like this?" from each side, with neither side willing to bend/give a little.

    Honestly, my opinion is that those Athiests that practice thumping people over the head with their views are not truth Athiests, but are merely doing such for shock value and nothing more, because they *know* it gets a rise out of Christians.
     
  10. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    Well, Christians espousing hate are, in my opinion, not true Christians. So as I said, it goes both ways.
     
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