Hunting

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Shooter, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. Shooter
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    Shooter Semper Fi

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    Anyone hunt? I'm a big-time hunter. Started at the age of 10 and have been doing it steadily ever since. I love to hunt anything and everything but down here in Florida the Florida Whitetail is my game of choice.

    Here's a quick no-shitter for those that are going to hunt but never have. First, go with someone that is seasoned. Don't band together with your greenhorn friends and go marching into it with no experience.

    Second, don't trample through the woods from one end to the other looking for deer. You'll find Jimmy Hoffa before you'll find any Whitetails. Instead pick a spot and wait. Then wait some more. If after a while you don't have any luck slooooooooowly make your way through the woods. Look for deer tracks, feces or any other clues that a deer may be in the vicinity. After moving stealthily through the forest pick another location and play the waiting game. And be VERY quiet. Now is not the time to chum it up with your buddies about the diving catch by the rookie center-fieldsman or the size of the new secretary's breasts. No, now is the time to honor that age-old tradition of silence.

    And venison is the absolute tastiest meat ever placed on earth by God.

    Anyone have any good hunting stories?
     
  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Well, it has been a long time since I have been hunting. However, what I hunted were Mule Deer. And I lived in an area that I saw them on a daily basis from the house I lived in. Really didn't hunt that much, I observed them over the summer, where they fed, and where they slept. And went up and got them out of bed and murdered them. Not that much sport. However, as you stated, there is no finer meat than venison.
     
  3. Big Black Dog
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    Big Black Dog Gold Member Supporting Member

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    I live on a farm that is over run with deer. I take my gun, a cup of coffee and my smokes and sit on my back steps. Deer comes along. Bang. End of story. I back up the truck and toss him on and take him to the check station. Takes about 20 minutes to get my deer. I get four a year. None of that high tech hunting crap for me. It isn't necessary and I don't have the time for it. Venison is indeed very good eating. Been eating it all my life. Been hunting since I was 9. Got a while yet before the season starts here.
     
  4. AllieBaba
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    AllieBaba BANNED

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    That's the sort of hunting I like.

    I don't hunt, I was raised on venison. My brother, my uncles, my dad, and everybody I went to school with hunted. They didn't have school during opening week because nobody was at school. Kids actually had guns in their pickups, on school grounds.

    I have dressed, butchered and cooked I don't know how much venison over the years. I have pictures of my toddler children next to bucks that are hanging, lol. I didn't eat beef for a period of a year when I was a senior...it was all venison, fish, homegrown meat (chicken, goat, lamb, rabbit, goose, duck).

    I'm the person who, when a deer runs into her car, backs up, loads it into the car and takes it home to bone in the tub and wrap up. Yes, I've done that.

    But I HATE to hunt. I don't like being around assholes with guns, I don't like being out and about during hunting season when I know there are assholes around with guns. I prefer my venison off-season.
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    LOL. Had a freind that always shot his deer a week early. Cut the day of the kill for the first day of season in case his freezer was checked. Just for the reason that you stated. To many idiots in the woods with guns during regular season.

    Of course, where you are at and from, out of season hunting was an accepted fact for those that did not have a lot of money. Nobody said anything unless someone was wasting the meat or selling it.
     
  6. jimbetty123
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    jimbetty123 Member

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    Hunting has survived from the beginning of civilization to the modern world. As a matter of fact, it has become one among the most popular hobbies and pastimes of the world. However, although it is the most popular, it can also be the most dangerous. There are a few basic guidelines that every hunter must follow before heading out into the wild.

    One of the most important aspects of hunting is knowing how to walk and hold a gun. Always ensure that the muzzle of the gun is pointing away from the hunter and companions. There are a couple of ways of doing this. One way is to side carry where you effectively carry the gun in one hand and tuck the stock between your body and elbow. However, it is recommended that the side carry not be done if the hunter is to walk through thick brush or has companions walking in front.

    The ready carry is another option. In the ready carry, the two hands hold the gun with the muzzle pointing upwards towards the front. Here the trigger finger needs to rest on proper guard.

    In the sling carry, both the hands are free. In this method, the gun's muzzle rests skywards. In case there are companions behind, this would not be a recommended method of carrying the gun.

    The trail carry is where the gun is held at a position between the trigger and action. In case a person is walking in front, the hunter might be safer not using a trail carry as the muzzle points forward and not down.

    On establishing a comfortable and safe method of carrying the weapon, the hunter should proceed to chalk out a plan on what to do on encountering the target. Before doing so, a 'zone of fire' should be established by the hunter so that it can be determined where each should track and shoot when game appears. This is done so that no hunter encroaches on to another hunter's zone.

    There are many safety precautions that need to be considered while hunting from boats. First and foremost, you need to ensure that the weapon being used by the hunter who sits in the boat's bow is unloaded. This gun must face the bow. After this, the next hunter should place her or his unloaded gun inside the stern along with the muzzle pointing rearwards. The hunters must always keep in mind that the boat needs to be anchored while shooting and that all hunters must shoot in opposite directions.

    There are many hunters who practice on ranges in order to maintain their sharp skills. There are a set of safety commands that need to be followed here too so that all the participants can enjoy safely. For example, when a hunter says that the range is hot, it means the range is available for shooting and no live objects are present on the range. Cease-fire means that all firing must be stopped immediately. Ready is another commands that is followed closely on the shooting range. This precautionary command is given prior to the range is hot command. All the shooters repeat the word ready from the right to the left so that the firing line is assuredly safe and clear.
    http://ezinearticles.com/?Safety-Precautions-In-Hunting---Dont-Shoot-Your-Own-Foot&id=1659597
     

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