Eye In The Sky: Rise Of Domestic Spy Planes Exposed...

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by paulitician, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Is there a drone in your neighbourhood? Rise of spy planes exposed after FAA is forced to reveal 63 launch sites across U.S.


    There are at least 63 active drone sites around the U.S, federal authorities have been forced to reveal following a landmark Freedom of Information lawsuit. The unmanned planes – some of which may have been designed to kill terror suspects – are being launched from locations in 20 states.

    Most of the active drones are deployed from military installations, enforcement agencies and border patrol teams, according to the Federal Aviation Authority.

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    But, astonishingly, 19 universities and colleges are also registered as owners of what are officially known as unmanned aerial vehicles. It is thought that many of institutions, which include Cornell, the University of Colorado, Georgia Tech, and Eastern Gateway Community College, are developing drone technology.

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    There are also 21 mainstream manufactures, such as General Atomics, who are registered to use drones domestically. As well as active locations, the FAA also revealed 16 sites where licences to use spy planes have expired and four where authorisations have been disapproved, such as Otter Tail County, Minnesota

    The authority revealed the information after a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by Electronic Frontier Foundation. Its website hosts an interactive map that allows the user to zoom in to the area around where they live to see if any sites are nearby.

    However, the FAA is yet to reveal what kinds of drones might be based at any of these locations. The agency says it will release this data late


    Read more: Is there a drone in your neighbourhood? Rise of killer spy planes exposed after FAA is forced to reveal 63 launch sites across U.S. | Mail Online
    DRUDGE REPORT 2012®
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  2. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    What's your point? There have been helicopters patrolling the skies of most major cities for decades, not to mention that there are other uses for aerial reconnaissance besides spying on people. What's astonishing about universities having them? Where do you think stuff like that gets developed, anyway?
     
  3. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, spying on your Citizens is good. Man, what happened to our Country? Why are so many such loyal Goose Steppers? What a bleak future for our Country.
     
  4. BlindBoo
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    BlindBoo Gold Member

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    Look up in the sky...

    Is it a Bird?

    Is it a Plane.

    Yes! Well, it's an unmanned sky writing drone writing......

    "FAUXRAGEOUS"
     
  5. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Looks like the Corporations are getting into the Spy Drone Business too. What a Country.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  6. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Why i am not surprised you're not outraged? Carry on, little Goose Stepper.
     
  7. LordBrownTrout
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    LordBrownTrout Gold Member

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    Of course they would fall in line when a democrat was in power.
     
  8. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Yup.
     
  9. BlindBoo
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    BlindBoo Gold Member

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    Because you're a specious moroonie?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/18/t...the-public-cleared-to-fly.html?pagewanted=all

    WOODLAND HILLS, Calif. — Daniel Gárate’s career came crashing to earth a few weeks ago. That’s when the Los Angeles Police Department warned local real estate agents not to hire photographers like Mr. Gárate, who was helping sell luxury property by using a drone to shoot sumptuous aerial movies. Flying drones for commercial purposes, the police said, violated federal aviation rules.

    “I was paying the bills with this,” said Mr. Gárate, who recently gave an unpaid demonstration of his drone in this Southern California suburb.

    His career will soon get back on track. A new federal law, signed by the president on Tuesday, compels the Federal Aviation Administration to allow drones to be used for all sorts of commercial endeavors — from selling real estate and dusting crops, to monitoring oil spills and wildlife, even shooting Hollywood films. Local police and emergency services will also be freer to send up their own drones.

    But while businesses, and drone manufacturers especially, are celebrating the opening of the skies to these unmanned aerial vehicles, the law raises new worries about how much detail the drones will capture about lives down below — and what will be done with that information. Safety concerns like midair collisions and property damage on the ground are also an issue.

    American courts have generally permitted surveillance of private property from public airspace. But scholars of privacy law expect that the likely proliferation of drones will force Americans to re-examine how much surveillance they are comfortable with.

    “As privacy law stands today, you don’t have a reasonable expectation of privacy while out in public, nor almost anywhere visible from a public vantage,” said Ryan Calo, director of privacy and robotics at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford University. “I don’t think this doctrine makes sense, and I think the widespread availability of drones will drive home why to lawmakers, courts and the public.”
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  10. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Nah, you're just a duped little Goose Stepper. Nothing more, nothing less.
     

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