Empathy v law

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by strollingbones, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    FEW people recognised the white-haired protester, but everyone knew her story. Norma McCorvey is better known as “Jane Roe”, the pregnant litigant behind Roe v Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalised abortion. Ms McCorvey is now passionately pro-life. On July 13th, she was briefly arrested for disrupting the first day of Sonia Sotomayor’s Senate confirmation hearings by hollering for Roe v Wade to be overturned.

    That is unlikely to happen any time soon, if ever. If Barack Obama thought Ms Sotomayor would vote to overturn Roe, he would not have nominated her to the Supreme Court. Granted, presidents sometimes make mistakes, and Ms Sotomayor has been predictably guarded about her views. Asked privately last month if she thought the unborn had rights, she reportedly said she had never thought about it.

    To many conservatives, Roe v Wade was a watershed. The constitution does not mention abortion. Yet the Supreme Court read between the lines and found a right to choose one, thereby seizing control of abortion policy from elected state legislators. That fuelled the culture war, for two reasons. First, a large minority of Americans think abortion is murder. Second, many think judges should not substitute their personal preferences for the law. And that is the issue that has so far dominated Ms Sotomayor’s confirmation hearings.


    The Supreme Court: Empathy v law | The Economist

    seems the majority of americans are approving of this judge.
     
  2. Arawyn
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    Arawyn Bringer of Light

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    One of my law professors had written a very good article about that decision. Essentially how idiotic it was that a matter of placement became the central issue. I wish that I still had the article.
     

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