Do you deep fry?

Discussion in 'Food & Wine' started by nt250, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. nt250
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    nt250 Senior Member

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    I have a Fry Daddy that I've used for years. I liked it because when my kid was little it was about the safest way to deep fry.

    But it's gotten old and it's getting harder and harder to get the insert clean. Plus it only goes up to 375 degrees and a lot of the recipes I see these days say to fry at 400. I'm not sure how much difference that really makes.

    I like to use it a lot. I make french fries a lot. I like making fish and chips. I use a beer batter I got off of Sara Moulton's show Cooking Live a few years ago. I make fried shrimp a lot. I keep a lot of snacks and stuff in the freezer that make a good, quick meal. And they always come out better when deep fried. Mozzarella sticks. Egg rolls. Fried clams. And, or course, french fries.

    My kid is 13 now so safety isn't an issue anymore. What's the best way to deep fry? And what type of fat do you use?
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I haven't a deep fryer. I 'fry' in oil very little. But once in awhile I will 'deep fry' shrimp. I use enough Crisco to kill a bull, 4 inches in a huge frypan, fire up full speed!
     
  3. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    Yes I deep fry, in fat and oil, mostly oil. Most of the time in a frying pan where there is much better temp control IMO. I’ve had several deep fryers and IMO their performance peters-out in way to short a time (they fail to even heat to 375 in a very short time). Unless you’re going for cheap and convenient, use a frying pan. But be careful, grease and oil on a stovetop are the cause of many house fires. I’m sure you know that though.
     
  4. nt250
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    nt250 Senior Member

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    I always use Crisco, too. But, believe it or not, when I went to the store last week they didn't have any. All the Crisco was gone. I usually put the can in upside down, close the lid on the Fry Daddy, and in a few minutes the shortening will just slide out.

    I tried peanut oil this time. I bought a big bottle of peanut oil and I'm using that right now. I can't tell the difference.
     
  5. nt250
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    nt250 Senior Member

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    Yeah, I've had two different versions of the Fry Daddy over the years. My first one was black metal and you just plugged it in and used a metal scoop. If you touched the sides of it, you'd burn yourself pretty good. I bought the second version for one of my sisters for Christmas one year. I got sick of seeing it go unused so I finally asked her if she was ever going to use it and she said no. So I took it home with me. That one is a big white counter top model and has a basket and a lid on it.

    When I was growing up my mother kept a sauce pan with Crisco and a basket in it on the stove all the time. We had french fries every night except on Sundays. My mother worked 4-midnight for most of my childhood, and there were 6 of us kids, so we ate a alot of stuff my father could just cook real easy and fast. A lot of french fries. A lot of fish sticks.

    One thing I wish I could find these days are Howard Johnson's Shrimp Croquettes. They weren't deep fried, you cooked those in the oven. They don't make them anymore, apparently.

    Another thing my mother made a lot was hamburg casserole. What other people call Shepherds Pie. That was good. That's the only time I ever remember having anything with a vegetable in it.

    On Sundays we had a big dinner with all the fixings. But every other day of the week? Straight out of the freezer. It's amazing I've lived this long.
     
  6. The ClayTaurus
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    The ClayTaurus Senior Member

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    You need to get the peanut oil super hot to get the benefit. I think it smokes at almost 450, if not higher.
     
  7. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    The peanut oil should impart a different taste, acutally a nutter flavor to the food.

    I do not fry much at home, but have deep fried plenty of food in my time. The type of oil can make a difference, but for home use really not to much. Like Clay pointed out the smoke point of oils are important. Most vegetable oils will work fine. A heavy pot (even cast iron) is the best, it will evenly conduct the heat through out the oil. The amount of oil is important as well, depending on how much food is being cooked. The recovery time is lessend with a greater amount of oil. Meaning as you drop cold food into the oil, the oil will drop in temperature, the quicker it recovers to the proper temperature the better. Resulting in a less greasy end result.

    Typically the oil can be cooled and filtered for future use. Store in a air tight container. Filter with a funnel and coffee filter.
     
  8. nt250
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    nt250 Senior Member

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    Do people actually do that? Gosh. I usually just plug it in long enough to loosen the fat, and then I dump it all out, wash out the insert, and start with fresh fat.

    The peanut oil won't solidify so I don't know what the heck I'm going to with with it now. I don't know. It looks way to dirty to use again. Even if I strained it. I have a funnel and coffee filters, but what a mess and it must take forever.
     
  9. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    Whoops, I miss spoke. Filter the oil (just warmed) then cool. I really does not take any time.

    If not burned, the oil should be good for several cooking times.
     

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